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March 09, 1914 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-03-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


E

T.P
TRIP

fair weeks of work behind
he Michigan baseball candi-
a well along towards the point
oach Carl Lundgren will be-
process of picking a team
e three scores of players at
osal.
gh it is still too early to
e on the make-up of the team
aptain Sisler will lead on the
training trip through Dixie,'
likely that most of the many
will be carried south.
many of these men are by no

the season, other things being equal
they will have the precedent, as it is
extremely unlikely that the Wolverines
will be able to get any practice on
Ferry Field before the Easter trip.
The hurling staff of Bell's team is
all available, and the trio are all in
excellent early season shape. In fact
it is rather doubtful if any of the re-
cruit hurlers will be able to displace
Sisler's able abbetters in the box,
Quaintance and Baribeau.
The biggest opening seems to be
behind the plate, where Bear is the
only veteran left. Hippler, who was
on the squad all last year, looks like
quite a probable selection; while Mat-
son, Wyman, and Benton are other
recruits who have drawn favorablej

U

appraisals from the critics.
On the infield, Howard at first, Mc-
Queen at second, Baker at short, and
Hughitt at third, is the quartet of
veterans whom the recruits are trying
to displace. As Howard did not play
the first sack regularly it is consider-
ed the most uncertain position. Ross
Caswell and Werum are among the
promising looking candidates for the
job.
The outfield positions are more un-
certain than any other positions on
the team, as the coach will hardly be
able to properly size up the men until
they can get out on Ferry Field and
nab the flies. Batting strength will
likely count heavily in the choice of
fielders who will go south. Cory and
Sheehy are the veteran gardeners.
COSTUMES SNACK
OF BLITHE PAREE,
(Continued from page 1)
silk waists they almost cover, de-
scribe the apparelling of the little girl
art students. Scarlet ties encircling
the necks of these fair little innocents,
and spreading over the expanse of white
silk bosom complete this color melee
of scarlet and white. In this scene,
the artists themselves appear in their
velvet blouses, peg-top trousers, fian-F
der ties, and swagger hats.
The second act transports one from
the land of daring suggestiveness, and
the graceful abandon of models, to
another fairy-land of beautiful figures
in evening gowns. This scene is in a
cabaret, and the brilliancy of the

RECRUITS NEEDED
TO BOLSTER TEAM
Cornell and Wesleyan alone of the
thirteen teams which competed in the
1913 Eastern Intercollegiate track
meet at Cambridge, have lost more
point-winners from their last year's
teams than has Michigan. Harvard is
tied with the Wolverines in the matter
of misfortune in losing points, the
cisterners and Michigan being each
shy this year the men who won nine
of their markers in the meet of last
spring. Wesleyan has lost every one
of her point winners, while Cornell 's
roll call shows that out of the 17 /i
points which she garnered last year,
the men representing all pat 3% ot
them have left the Big Red ranks.
Captain Haff, Sargent and Smith of
the Wolverines who took places in the
big event last spring, will be absent
from the squad when the Michigan
team journeys down to Cambridge this
gowns forms a gay contrast to the pro-
saic black and white of the evening
clothes of their consorts.
There has continually been kept in
m ind, the ambition to create
something that would carry over the
footlights to any audience, no matter
how far in location and interest from
Ann Arbor. It is this zeal, extended
to the department of the costuming
that places this element of the 1914
Opera far in advance of previous of-
ferings.

AST OR WEST,
North or South--It
matters not from

year. Haff copped five points in the
quarter mile run, Sargent took one in
the high jump, and Smith did his share
by contributing three in the two-mile
run. Had Smith returned to school
he - would have been eligible to com-
pete, but he failed to show up. laff,
though still in the university, is out of
the Intercollegiate via the three-year
rule route.
Michigan finished third in the big
meet last spring, five points behind
victorious Pennsylvania, and two and
one-half points back of Harvard, the
winner of second place. Penn loses
but five of those all-necessary points,
and with this argument as their foun-
dation, the eastern sport experts are
already picking the Quakers to carry
off the honors again this year. And'
it seems hard to figure out just where
their predictions are going to mis-
carry.
Michigan still has Bond, Seward,
Jansen and Kohler of the combination'
which won points last year, on whom
to rely for the tallies during the com-
ing competition. There is no doubt
but that they will show better this
year than they did last, but the ex-
perts of several other universities are
figuring out the same likelihood for
their*favorites. And to add to the
complications, Harvard, Pennsyl-
vania and Cornell are boasting of re-
cruits which are expected to cut heav-
ily into the point-winning column
which the veterans now consider clos-
ed to all save themselves.
Sewyard and Bond may be relied on
to make a better showing this year
than last, and Michigan men are look-
ing to them for at least two points
more than they garnered last spring.
Kohler expects to hoist himself up
alongside Whitney this year, although
Beatty of Columbia, the man who
took second in the shot-put last year,
is still eligible for the meet. Jansen
should do better than fourth this year
with both Haff and Cozzens out of
the competition. The injection of
Meredith, the Penn wizard, into the
fray, may cut him down some, how-
ever. For new points Michigan must
look to the men who were freshmen
last year. Murphy and Fox may show
the necessary class. Smith in the
sprints may develop enough speed to
count, especially in view of the fact
that five places instead of the cus-
tomary four, will now win counters.

(Continued from page 3.)
of Regents to the amount of $300, and
admit the student to work in the
graduate school on the one condition
that they be willing to give four hours
a week to the university as instruc-
tors. Practically the same terms gov-
ern the five other university fellow-
ships which are $500 in amount.
Principal among the other fellow-
ships are the two given by the Michi-
gan Gas Association to engineers who.
wish to specialize in gas engineering.
One of the fellowships is worth $500
per annum and the other brings to the
student $300. A fellowship in tanning
has been endowed by Carl E. Schmidt
and is worth $600 per year to the suc-
cessful student.Other fellowshipsare-
the Angeline Bradford Whittier Fel-
lowship in Botany, and two Buhl Fel-
lowships and the George S. Morris.
Fellowship in Philosophy, besides
many others.
There are also five university fel-
lowships, given for residence in the-
Graduate school, and which are
awarded each year to students in ten
of the Michigan state colleges. The
holders of these fellowships are se--
lected by the faculties of the various
colleges.

points if lie but comes out I
event, the hurdles. Jimmie h
yet shown up at training qua
but it is expected that when th,
comes he will be ready to
share.
SCHOLARSHIPS GIVEN ANNI

£

whence you hail,
our store is the
style-center of this
section, due to the
fact that we feature
STEIN - BLOCH

H- ---
HUYLER'S!

Smart Clothes
LINDENSCHMIDT APFEL
& COMPANY
Home of Stein-Bloch Clothing and Imperial Hats

THE HOME OF
REXALL
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When used as a gift does not have
to be accompanied with the explana-
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Good."

DEAN & CO., LTD..
214 MAIN ST. Phone 57

REXALL signifies Qual,
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The BROWN DRUGSTORE
E. C. EDSILL, Prop.
122 5. Main Street

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Cooling. Thermo-syphon or natural water cooling system-no
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Frame. Cold-rolled steel, hot riveted.
Wheelbase. 114 inches. Clutch. Cone, leather-faced.
Transmission. Selective, sliding-gear type, three speeds for-
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Ignition. Splitdorf magneto with dashboard transformer. Bat-
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Lubrication. Costant-level splash, pump-circulated, with
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Steering Gear. Worm and gear, adjustable; i8-inch steering
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Front Axle. I-beam section, drop-forged in one heat, without
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Roadster
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SPECIFICATIONS-For All Ford Model T Cars
Motor. Four cylinder, four cycle. Cylinders are cast en-bloc
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rated at twenty horse-hower. Special Ford removable cylinder
heads permits easy access to pistons, cylinders and valves.
Transmission. Special Ford spur planetary type, combining
ease of operation and smooth, silent running qualities. Clutch.
Multiple steel disc, operating in oil. Magneto. Special Ford
design, built in and made a part of the motor. Only two parts
to the Ford Magneto, a rotary part attached to the flywheel, and
a stationary part attached to the cylinder casting. Lubrica-
tion. Combination gravity and splash system. All moving
parts of motor work in oil and distribute it to all parts of the
power plant. Cooling. By Thermo-Syplhon water system. A
belt driven fan is also used in connetion with the cooling sys-
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