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March 09, 1914 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-03-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.-

mfi

N U1'I
niversity of Mic
ing except Mot

=GROSNER WRITES

h-
n-

the uiversity year.
at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
rider Act of Congress of March 3,
nn Arbor Press Building. Sub-
ice: by carrier, $2.so; by mail,
,t Ad. Stations: Press Building;'
iarmacy; University Pharmacy; C.
'or. Packardiand State.
elephones 96o and 2414.
>ulme ..........Managing Editor
on ............Business Manager
Opera Special.
W. Haislip......Publisher
sang .................Editor
enks ...........Asst. Editor
Reporters.
ett T. H. Tapping
rch R. S. Collins
RETROSPECTION.
n has been most successful
iionizing efforts. The stu-
I the faculty have given un-
endorsement. The social
a Michigan student has been
d in the Union. He looks to
n for his class dinners, for
nittee meetings, his dances,
is activity,.his club, his card
friendships, and his opera.
nual opera has done much to
Union before the campus.
putting the Union before the
Each year for the last six
las made thousands and thou-
contented friends for the
[ts influence can hardly be

MOST OF LYRICS
Nine MIslcal Numbers Are Written to
Song Poems from Pen of
One Student.
AUTHOR MELTON WRITES THREE.
S. S. Grosner, '14L, is the writer of
most of the lyrics for "A Model
Daughter," being the composer of the
words to nine of the gongs. The other
three are the work of W. R. Melton,
'13, author of the book. The songs are
said to be specially well adapted to
the play, not only because Qf the high
class of the music, but also due to the
pleasing rhythm of the words.
The following are the pieces which
Grosner has written the lyrics for:
"Opening First Act," "I Love to Tease
a Lover," "A Model Daughter," "Lan-
guage of Love," "The Jungle Ball,"
"The Holy Men," "Days of Long Ago,"
"You're Such a Little Queen," and
"I'll Always Love You." Melton has
written: "If I Could Only Find a Girl,"
"Opening Second Act," and "Finale
First Act."
This is practically Grosner's first
published work although he wrote the
words for "Hail Michigan," and "The
Saxaphone Rag," both well known
to the campus. He has done a con-
siderable amount of such writing,
however, for his own amusement, and
as he put it himself, this is his first
serious effort. He was prompted to
write the lyrics largely because of the
favorable impression made on the
committee by the lyrics which he
wrote for an Opera book that he sub-
mitted himself in the competition last
spring.

POSTERS SELL FOR TEN CENTS.,
Some Are Sent to Chicago and Detroit
to Advertise Play.
The poster for "A Model Daughter"
was designed by Don M. Cottrell, '14A.
Nearly one thousand of the drawings
have been printed and are on sale at
the State street stores at ten cents
each. The design, which is finished in
three colors, has proved popular not
only for advertising but for its artistic
merits. A large number have already
been sold, and if necessary another
issue will be printed.
The second prize was awarded to
L. M. Kishlar, '17E, and C. W. Ditchy,
'15, received the third honor. All of
the drawings submitted were of an ex-
ceptionally high standard. Cottrell's
design will go on the music score in
the same colors as the poster.
One lot of the posters were sent to
Detroit last week and others will be
sent to Chicago to advertise for the
production of the show there on
April 4.
SCENERY DEPICTS
BOHEMIAN WRLD

OPERA TROUPE TO
MAKE TWO TRIPS
Plays in Detroit, Friday, March 27, and
in Chicago, Saturday,
April 4.
WILL CARRY ABOUT EIGHTY MEN.
"A Model Daughter" will be pre-
sented in Detroit, Friday, March 27, at
the Broadway theatre and in Chicago
on Saturday, April 4, at the Audi-
torium theatre. Approximately 80
cast, chorus and committeemen will
be taken on these trips, which com-
prise the only out of town presenta-
tions that will be given. Alumni in
the respective cities are taking charge
of the arrangements.
The Detroit association, has not
done much thus far in active prepara-
tion, except to engage the theatre.
However, it is expected that tickets
will be placed on sale this week and
the campaign of advertising started.
The alumni feel sure that the show
will be played to a capacity house,
when the date arrives.
Shortly after "Contrarie Mary" was
given in Chicago last year a standing
committee was appointed to start plans
for this year's show, and to this end
everything possible has been done to
insure the success of the trip. The
Auditorium theatre where the produc-
tion will be staged has a seating ca-
pacity of approximately 5000. It is
already reported that about 3000 seats
have been sold or applied for.
The Michigan Bulletin, the official
publication of Chicago alumni asso-
ciation is the medium through which
most of the advertising and "boost-
ing" has been done. It is published'
monthly, and the last issue is fairly
alive with opera news and enthusiasm.
An editorial says, "no one who saw
"Contrarie Mary" will take a chance
on missing this year's show-and nei-
ther will their friends."

' lninersitg

f u sic

mbouse

MRS. M. M. ROOT

Press Building

Maynard Street

"A Model Daughter"
MVusic
On Sale at 8:00 P. M., March 18th
"That Saxa phone Rag"

1U,

11

Introduced by Waldo E. Fellows,
will be on Sale about March 13th

Latin Quarter is Conjured Up to
Realistic Background for
Plot Action.

Form

New Michigan Song Book
Contains lits from all former
Michigan operas

s, with pitiful-
to grow an
2800 and a life

proper fa-
ties as the
nembership
mblies, the
all smoker,
ureau, the
., and the

is!

igan
>ther
pro-
The
The
Our
high

SECOND ACT PRESENTS CABARET.
Scenery will constitute a large part
of the sensational Parisian tone in "A
Model Daughter." Scenic effects have
been executed by Detroit artists es-
pecially for the Union performance.
The colors and general effect 'of the
scenery of both acts has been planned
to harmonize with the costumes, and
to give the desired Bohemian atmos-
phere.
The first act represents the studio
of a Parisian artist. The artist, whose
patrons are not of the most conven-
tional sort, has a studio which is in
good taste, but at the same time indi-
cative in many ways of a gay life. A
many-paned window looks out over
the housetops of the city, making an
observer feel that the studio is far
away from the sordid things of the
city.
The second act, the principal one of
the play, is in a cabaret, and in gener-
al the setting for this will not be un-
like that of the "Spring Maid." In ad-
dition to the customary cabaret fix-
tures, there will be a large fountain in
the center. The spray will be illum-
inated by an arrangement of many-
colored lights, which is planned to
produce a beautiful sparkling effect.
Nothing as elaborate as this has been
attempted in other operas, and it is
thought that it readily will harmon-
ize with the other sensational features.
A beautiful column effect will consti-
tute the background of the scene.

gained sufficient
s to appear indif-
i week. We have
e to accept, non-
ine efforts at fem-

Chicago has banned the early dawn
dances; New York has barred the tur-
bulent tango from its cabarets; New
Orleans, the home of the Texas Tom-
my, and San Francisco, mother of the
Bunny Hug, have cut all table-top
trippings. A wave of moral revulsion
has built the tea house and the palais
de dance, where vigilance and straight-
laced rigor supplants abandon and
bacchanalian revelry. All this is
America.
Not so in the mecca of the risque,
not so in the whirling, seething, scof-
fing Paris. Oh La La! From the
mincing steps of the sidewalk cafe
and the daring innovations of the
Parisian ballroom, to the wild orgy
of the. Apache and the loose Bohem-
ian flippancies of the Latin Quarter-
ah!-we have arrived.
That's it! The Latin Quarter. The
dances of the Latin Quarter. What a
rosy tinted wealth of romance lights
the Bohemia of the artist-what poetry
in a gesture-and then what ballads
in a dance. A Latin Quarter dance is
an epic and at the same time a lyric,
but always epic bows to lyric as the
hero worships at the shrine of Venus.
Now back to America for a moment
-to Michigan-yes, to Ann Arbor.
Step this way, madam, and take my

11

I'I
Tea Dansants Are Milk
And Water To Orgies Of
Gay Parisian Latin Quarter

seat. Now are you comfortable? See
the reproduction? No, my dear, this
is not a Cercle Francais soiree nor the
Mardi Gras at its height. It is a
scene-you guessed it-from our own
operetta. See the dainty hooflets kick-
ing the silk finish off the standard
opera hats. Notice the seven veils
over there on the side-board, which
same seven are to be employed in the
dance that took the "shun" out of
hesitation.
Kind of bad, eh! When Tom and
Jim can put their cues in the rack
long enough to make up into winsome
winners. Poor, we suppose, when Art
and Bill can throw away the pipe or
discard the San Felice to wind through
the intricacies of a syncopation.
None of this, "Happy Country Maids
Are We" stuff. No "Seminary Life
Forever," or "The Cloister and The
Veil in this act. Empha-tic-all-y
No! Uh! Uh! It is the Latin Quar-
ter; it is elemental; it is primordial;
it is the wine when it is red. Dance?
What do you mean dance, best be-
loved? Can they? Is that it? Then
yea, yea, they can-or do you mean
do they? Hm! If so, they do. No
censorship or tape lines there. They
can and do-and when they do-um-m-
How they do!

J

d at the stud.
e have mar-
and mannish
encored with
ticularly clev-
otlights. And
L Daughter"
business, the
s laugh and

i

ry.
EE CLUB MEN TO
PERA CHORUS PARTS.
bronze men and waiters
will consist of the fol-
e glee club men: C. B.
T. Bushnell, '15, C. B.
L4L, J. E. Tinsman, Ira
P. Becker, T. M. Sawyer,
iett, '16, H. Wells, W. A.
Ettinger, '15, and H. C.
14. The glee club men
end volume and quality
numbers in the show.

W. A. Diekema, Writer of Music.'
SOUVENIR PROGRAM WILL BE
GIVEN AWAY AT EACH SHOW.
A souvenir program of 16 pages will
be distributed free at all performances
of "A Model Daughter." The cover
will be the same design as the poster,
and will be printed in colors. It will
contain a history of Union operas, a
synopsis of the play, and pictures of
the men in charge of the show.
Gargoyle Number Will Feature Opera.
Preparations for the Spot number
of the Gargoyle, to appear March 20,
are already under headway. This
number will be devoted to the Union
opera. The Spring number will ap-
pear as the May issue of the humor
magazine, the Campus number will be
the title of the June issue, and the
July number, the last of the year, will
treat of Joy and Sadness.'

FAIR FACE IN FEMALE FLUFr S
FILLS FAIR ONES WITH ENVY

S. S. Grosner, Writer of Lyrics.

From the land of the southern maid,
Kentucky, a man by fate, an actress
by natural adaptability, Durward Grin-
stead, creator of unbounded furor for
the grace and beauty of Julienne in
last year's opera, comes to us this
season as Brownie Dupont, a profes-
sional model in "A Model Daughter."
Durward's mastery of feminine
movement and his ability to create the
atmosphere of powders and laces has
spread far, and quickly. Following
his success last year in Chicago, Jul-
ien Eltinge, world famous as the
widow in his play, "The Fascinating
Widow," offered Grinstead $100 a week
to take the part of the widow.
This recognition from the greatest
profesional female impersonator was
tempting, but the student felt that col-
lege was a period of a few years and
the stage was always open, so he de-
clined.

The ease with which Grinstead car-
ries himself in petticoats is shown by
the interview which a Daily reporter
had with him last year. After one of
the opera performances, Grinstead
was taken to the Daily office. The
editor called in a'new reporter and re-
quested him to act as interpreter for
the lady who spoke nothing but
French. French was the reporter's
stronghold, but the soft utterances of
the lady so flustered the interpreter
that he stammered a few compli-
ments to the fair one and pleaded ig-
norance of the French tongue.
This will be Grinstead's second ap-
pearance in the opera cast. He has
been here three years, entering on
advanced credit, and thus was unable
to participate in 1912 because it was
his first year of residence. It is hope-
less to forecast what will happen. His
actions are like a poem in motion.

EZ LA FEMME" REVEALS
'S INSPIRATION FOR MUSIC

MODERN FIREPROOF GARAGE.
The Breitenwischer Auto Company,
is now operating one of the most up-
to-date fire proof garages in this part
of the state, located at the corner of
Fourth and Williams. The building
is a new one story brick affair, com-
pleted and occupied about January 1.
The company holds the agencies for
the Ford and Overland, two of the
most popular cars on the market.
A general repair and supply busi-
ness is conducted, also, with a capa-
city for immediate service. About
fifty cars can be accommodated in the
building at one .time. Mr. Breiten-
wischer has had considerable exper-
ience in the automobile business, hav-
ing held the local agency for the Ford
during the past five years.

STAN C ER
FURNITURE CO,
Furniture, Carpets
Rugs, Linoleums
Draperies,Window
Shades, Upholster-
ing, Repairing and
Refinishing.
117-119 WLiberty SI
Phone 443

.at "music hath charms," especial-
hen the inspiration comes from a
an, can hardly be denied, even
Villis A. Diekema, '14, writer of
music for "A Model Daughter."
be it known to the patrons of
production, and of "Contrarie
e," Mr. Diekema gained much of
nspiration and many valuable sug-
ons from one of "the fair sex,"
a resident of the now famous city
olland.
e music of "Just Arranged for
floated out upon the summer's
ze. It was- being "ragged," and
y sounded pretty good. The
lim and swing to it was most en-
cing, most alluring.
slight, trim figure tripped across
lawn, across the veranda and into
music room, to where "Bill," as
s popularly known, was seated at
Aano working out one of his most
lar "hits."
on't 'rag' it, Bill, dear," said a

Bill turned, and glanced up into the
soft, interested eyes. Then relinquish-
ing his place at the piano; the mys-
terious young woman, a graduate of
the New England Conservatory of
Music, seated herself and showed
"Bill" how it should be played. Only
a woman with the inspiration of love,
and early summer could play the pop-
ular song hit of "Contrarie Mary" as
"Bill" Diekema finally wrote it.
"I have made a special attempt, this
year, to make the music bright and
melodious," said Mr. Diekema, in a
recent conversation.
"There are ten songs in the pro-
duction, besides two opening choruses
and finales. The music constitutes a
distinct part of the play. Every song
fits into the action, and serves to em-
phasize the situation on the stage at
the time that it is sung."
Mr. Diekema composed all of the
music for "A Model Daughter,"
with the exception of one song, "The
Land of Love," by Waldo Fellows, '14.

Lq

WURSTER BROS.

Detroit and
Catherine Sts.
Phone 423

The CITY ICE CO
GUY L. MULLISON, Prop.

ANN ARBox, MICHIGAN

Dealers in

Dealers in Natural Ice
And Spring Water

PURE MILK

AND CREAM

OFFICE, 326 E. ANN ST.

PHONE 87

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