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March 09, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-03-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-'X

LfIOVI

Ie

Michigan

Daily

EXTR

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, MONDAY, MARCH 9, 1914.
M IIIIIIIII IIIIIIIII I I I --

KETS WILL
E PLACED ON.
SALE MARCH 13
Members May Obtain Slips,
ichi Entitle Holder to Pur-
chase Six Seats, at
Union Today.
iftice Of Hill Auditorium
Ats for "A Model Daughter"
placed on sale, Friday, March
:he Hill Auditorium box office,
all members of the Michigan
will have an opportunity to
their seats. The morning sale
ng at 10:00 o'clock will be re-
1 to members of the cast,
committee, and orchestra, and
men, members of the Union
rish ' seats for the "Faculty
performance, Wednesday,
18. After 2:00 o'clock all
members will be eligible to
heir reservations. The sale to
ieral public will begin on the

LOCAL ALLUSIONS ARE OMITTED
Xeither Lines or Songs of Opera Make
Reference to Ann Arbor
or Vicinity.
No reference to Ann Arbor or en-
virons is made in the lines of the 1914
opera. This is the first Michigan
Union opera that has not contained
some allusion to local customs or ex-
pressions.
The preceding operas have not all
had their scenes in Ann Arbor, but in
some place or other in the book, lines
have been found with local coloring
in a reference to custom, or a play on
words of some expression in vogue
among the undergraduates.
It was the idea of the author of this
year's book, that all the clever take-
offs on local matters had been worn
out by over-use, and that he would be
more successful if he left this field
strictly alone.
The playwright was probably also
moved by the desire to produce a play
that dramatic critics would pass fav-
orable judgment on for the profession-
al stage. Local allusion would only
tend to destroy the effect of the play
when presented before an audience
that was unmindful of the special
meaning.
COSTUMES SMACK
OF BLITHE PAREE
Precedent has been cast to the four
winds in the selection of costumes for
the chorus and cast of this year's
production of the Mimes, " A Model
Daughter." New York was drag-
netted for fashions fresh from Paris,
and the dazzling charm of the models
in the opening scene will attest to the
success of the search.
Varia-colored tango gowns, as beau-
tiful and various in hue as the wings
of the most gorgeous butterflies, grace
the slender forms of the models. Slim
low bosomed beauties with every
curve of form enhanced by the mod-
ish devices of the slit skirt, the bal-
loon effect from Turkish seralgios,
and daring cut of bodice, will sway
to music in the stately steps of the
hesitation and the graceful accord of
the one step. When a slender ankle
peeps out as the skirt is lifted in the
dance, anklets of fur and of bangles
will heighten the effect of Paris real-
ism, and the display of the lamp-shade,
skirt, startling in its conception, will
establish beyond dispute the atmos-
phere of the Capital of the world,
with its grisetted boulevards, and
Latin quarter.
Scarlet blazers, above white fian-
nell skirts, in contrast to the white
(Continued on page 4.)

PERSONNEL OF COMMITTEES,
CAST, AND CHORUS OF UNION
OPERA,"A MODEL DAUGHTER"

Committees.
General Chairman, Karl B.. Hoch,
'14; Master of Costumes, R. H. Braun,
'14E; Master of Properties, Carl
Guthe, '14; Treasurer, Homer Heath.
Assistants to General Chairman, K. S.
Baxter, '15E, C. L. Kendrick, '15, E. C.
Wilson, '15. Assistants to Master of
Costumes, Benjamin Bartlett, '14, H.
G. Gault, '15, Cecil Brown, '15. Assist-
ants to Master of Properties, Howard
Marsh, '15, W. B. Thom, '15, J. S.
Leonard, '16L. Music publishing com-
mittee, Carroll Mills, '14, chairman,
H. G. Allerton, '14, Robert Tannahill,
'15, F. F. McKinney, '16L. Publicity
committee, E. W. Haislip, '14L, chair-
man, Leo Burnett, '14, Carlton Jenks,
'15, Chester Lang, '15. Assistants to
treasurer, J. B. Angell, '16, Paul
Thompson, '16L, Louis Bruch, '16L,
Richard Thorsch, '16. Electrician, T.
D. Weaver, '16E.
Cast.
Brownie Dupont-Durward Grinstead,
'14.
PaulMarcelle-George McMahon, '16.,
Pierre-Waldo Fellows, '14.
Babette-Leon Cunningham, '16.
Caroline Sedley-George Moritz, '15.

Colonel Sedley-Bruce Bromley, '14.
Jerry Borden-Bernus Kline, '14.
Count Bilderkrank-S. L. Adelsdorf,
'14L.
Countess Bilderkrank-G. C. Eldredge,
'14.
Monsieur Berode-Martin Briggs, '14.
"Kippy" Dunn-A. M. Reed, '15L:
Elleurette-C. G. Shipley, '16.
Raymond Fibbre-R. M. Parsons, '14.
Chorus.
Twenty-two will be selected from
the following: Girl Art Students:--
V. R. Dibble, '14E, J. R. Craine, '14E,
L. C. Standt, '15, D. M. Morrill, '16,
A. V. Murtha, '14M, L. V. Alexander,
'16, D. B. Wurzburg, '15, A. Thompson,
'16, A. F. Bassett, '14E, Gleed Miller,
'14; Models: J. B. Angell, '16, F. H.
Begole, '16, L. E. Hughes, '16E, H. H.
Frank, '16, D. W. Jennings, '16, S. T.
Steen, '16E, J. W. Finkenstaedt, '16E,
Paul Bowen, '16, J. C. Marble, '16E,
R. B. Stearns, '16; Men Artists: H. K.
Lane, '15, F. P. Surgenor, '16, N. M.
James, '16E, H. C. Duffield, '16, H. B.
Bartholf, '16E, H. M. Easley, '16, H.
Bell, '14, H. D. Warner, '16E, J. C.
Melaniphy, '16L, A. S. Palmer, '16E,
J. C. Abbott, '15E.

TRIALS EXCITE WIDE INTEREST
Larger Numbers than in Any Previous
Year Come Out for Cast
and Chorus.
If success of Union operas may be
measured by interest, "A Model
Daughter" should occupy a position
high above all others. The problem of
the committee from the start has been
the difficulty of choosing from a large
bunch of good men, while in past
years it has sometimes been neces-
sary to urge men to come out.
For a chorus of 32 men, 170 men
competed. All of these were excel-
lent dancers, and a majority had con-
siderable singing ability. At first the
problem of making cuts seemed al-
most impossible, but by constant trials,
men have been crossed from the list,
until there is now a manageable num-
ber.
For the cast of 13 parts, there were
50 tryouts. This includes a large
number of last year's men, and nearly
all of them were given a close race
by the host of new men. The com-
mittee feels that there is now a cam-
pus-wide interest in the opera, and
that next year, men will turn out in
even greater numbers. ,

Nichigemlda, ioanzalanw, C
Chest Culture, Awaken
Ramases and Contrarie
Mry on List.

HISTORIES OF
PAST OPERI

ARE REVIE

SIs SevenihAnnual

! 1

The spring of 1908 witnesse
maiden attempt at a Michigan
opera, produced entirely by st
for presentation to a public aud
Since this memorable beginnin,
other operas have been staged
another "A Model Daughter" w
pear on the boards at the W
theatre, next week in four conse
performances.
"Michigenda," the first prod
was given at the Whitney i
spring of 1908, and was meant
to some extent the place of the
Circus, discontinued the year pre
Donald Hamilton Haines, '08, wl

1915 BOOKS WILL
BE DUE. BY MAY'

11

MYSTERY OF MONA LISA GIVES
MELTON FOUNDATION OF PLOT

, General Chairman.

morning of Monday, March 16, 9:00
o'clock, at the Whitney theatre.
Union members must obtain slips,
certifying to their membership, before
buying seats. These slips will be given.
out at the Union from 9:00 o'clock
today until 5:00 o'clock, Thursday.
Each slip will entitle the holder to
buy six seats, but one member can
purchase no more than six seats even
if he holds several slips. This action
was taken to prevent one student at
the head of the line, from buying seats
for all his friends, and taking all the
desirable reservations, before those
further back had their chance.
It is planned to hold four perfor-
mances in Ann Arbor, but there is a
possibility of a performance Saturday
night, if the advance sale of seats
should warrant it. The student sale
in past years had taken up almost all
the seats ffor the four performances,
and if the demand is heavy when the
general sale begins and the mail or-
ders are considered, the fifth appear-
ance may become a reality. Mail or-
ders for seats will be treated in the
same manner as last year, when they
were not filled until after the begin-

"In writing a show like "A Model
Daughter," two conditions faced us at
the outset. In the first place, the
Union Opera as a Campus institution
had outgrown its swaddling clothes.
We were at a stage, where effective-
ness could no longer rest'on absurd-
ity. All of which is another way of
saying that we were up against the
real thing; that it was up to us to
produce something as near the real
thing as college men can make it. We
had the actors for such a production,
we had the composers; it was up to
the author to produce the book for
them."
"The second condition we faced was
this. The natural evolution of col-
lege opera is away from, and not in
the direction of, strictly local pro-
ductions. One campus, by the very
nature of its existence, is a limited
field; it may be good for a time, and
funny for a while; but even real funny
things cease to be amusing after they
are worked half a dozen times or
more. Further, each new set of pro-

ducers is prompted by the natural de-
sire to do something newer, something
better than has gone before. So my
big desire in starting an opera of the
type we have this year, was to create
something that could be up-to-date."
"The selection of the exact locale of
the show was a matter of much inter-
est to me. I first thought of Germany
as a pleasant and entertaining setting
for a college show. But an "idea" I
received switched me in favor of Paris.
At that time the papers were still
creating a furore over the disappear-
ance of the Mona Lisa. It occurred to
me that it would be a ripping idea-
with the accent now on the ripping-
to build a plot around the disappear-
ance of this masterpiece, with stu-
dents solving the mystery. Well, the
plot never blossomed, of course, but
it gave the exact foundation I had
wanted for the opera. Studio life, the
Latin quarter, romance in art, and
mixing with it a strain of Yankee
blood from "across the pond," all this
to make a tale of gay Paree.

Books for the 1915 Opera will be
due before the end of the last week
of April, and the. announcement of
the successful author will be made
early in May,,
Meetings have been held during the
past month, in whichthe general re-
quirements which the writers must
follow in the form of their work, was
explained. From the number that at-
tended these meetings, there is every
indication that a larger number of
books than ever before will be sub-
mitted.
With the announcement of the selec-
tion of the book, trial lyrics will be
given out to all who wish to compete
in the writing of the songs. This
music to these trial lyrics must be
in the hands of the committee before
the end of May, and the composers
that have shown the most talent
in their offerings, will be selected to
write the music for the overture and
the finale, with the competition for
the other music left open.
The competition in the writing of
the final lyrics closes during the first
week of June, when judgment will be
passed on them, and the chosen, ones
given out to the composers of the
music. The final call will be issued
in November, when all must be ready
to submit their finished production.

W. R. Melton, Author of Book.
since attained marked success in
field of magazine writing, wrote
book, and Roy Welch, '09, compo
all the music. Welch is now N
known as a professional song wri
After the success that attended
staging of the first opera it was
cided to make it an annual event,
the second opera made its appeara
in the fall pf 1909. It was cal
"Culture," and was written by
same two students, Haines and We
The books of these two producti
both had Ann Arbor as a back grot
and contained frequent allusions
Ypsilanti. Earl V. Moore, '12, now
structor in the School of Music
tered the field of opera music com
tition by writing one song for "C
ture."
The opera made its appearance
the fall of the year following wit
book written by Donald Kahn,
Fred Lawton, '11, wrote all the Lyr
and the music was the product of E
Moore, and Robert T. Moreland,
This was the first opera in which
scenery and action were not entir
wound up with the locality of .
Arbor, as in one of the scenes
audience was transported to the da
est jungle of Africa.
(Continued on page 3)

.1

UNION OPERA STARS IN

HILL

POPULAR CONCERT

THURSDAY

Of Michigan Glee and Mandolin Club

AUDITORIUM

NIGHT

ALL SEATS 25 CENTS

ng of the general sale.-

MIRTHFUL

MELODIOUS

MELANG]

A

IV

O

I

Iq

h

r

I

Presented

by The Mimes of the University of Michigan

Union

Book by W. -RAY MELTON

Music by WILLIS A. DIEKEMA and WALDO E. FELLOWS

Lyrics by SYLVAN S. GROSN

Privilege Slips, entitling Union Members to buy seats at the membership sale, will be given out at the Michigan Union this, Monday morning, at 9 a. m., and
tinue to be given out until Thursday, March 12, at 5 P. M.
Seat Sale to MEMBERS OF THE UNION, Friday, March 13th, 2 P. M., to Saturday, March 14th, 5 P. W., at Box Office, Hill Auditorium.
Seat Sale to GENERAL PUBLIC Monday, March 16th, 9 A. M., at Whitney Theatre Box Office.

.ES: Wednesday and Thursday Evenings and Saturday Matinee
Friday Evening . .a

.

.

.

.

a

.

$1.50, $1.00, 7
$2.00, $1.50, $1.

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