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August 09, 1985 - Image 8

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1985-08-09

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ARTS
Page 8 Friday, August 9, 1985
Guadaknl D y again!

I

The Michigan Daily

Tuesday night, August 13, P: We spent the month of July
Guadalcanal Diary will make a writing new material, finishing the
return appearance at the Blind Pig arrangements - it'll be recorded in.
in support of their album October and released in February.
D: How will the new album sound
Walking in the Shadow of the compared to Walking in the Shadow?
Big Man, recently re-released on P: It will be different. We've grown
Elektra, the band's new label. as a band and we're somewhat in-
Daily Arts staff writer Julie Jurr- terested in different areas of music. I
jens spoke with drummer John think we'll try some new things,
maybe a little swing music. I think the
Poe.. country - or should I say the
Daily: Do you have high hopes for western - aspect of the music might
your re-released LP on the new be toned down into more of a ballad
label? form, and the African aspect might be
Poe: This is an eight-month-old a little more prominent in the bass
record so we're not expecting it to and drums, and maybe in the guitars
take off with a zoom or anything. We too.
just wanted to make it available, if D: You've all said that Walking in
nothing else. the Shadow was a bit more slick-
D: What about the new record sounding than you expected. Do you
you're working on? think you'll be in a similar situation

with Elektra?
P: I know this - we'll spend a lot
more time on this record to get what
we want; whereas Big Man was
hastily done. We did a lot of
homework and then went into the
studio for five evenings of ten-hour
sessions and did it (Big Man) without
a minute to spare. If something soun-
ded good we'd leave it. It ended up
turning out really good. I think this
one though, we're going to be a little
more particular. There were elemen-
ts in Big Man that we didn't
necessarily pay attention to, like
acoustic guitars and a real lush mix.
D: The last time you were here, at
the Blind Pig, somebody put up
posters near the door that said you
were from Athens - and one of you
had written on it, "No we're not, we're
See PAGE, Page 11

R.E.M., Three O'Clock grow up

By John Logie
W HILE BOTH R.E.M. and The
Three O'Clock tend to get lum-
ped together under the paisley un-
derground banner, they are very dif-
ferent musically. R.E.M.'s brand of
rootsy, folksy music brings to mind
Creedence Clearwater Revivial,
Dylan, and the Byrds, but only
vaguely. The band has established its
own elegiac sound, fronted by
Michael Stipe's ethereal drone. The
Three O'Clock, by contrast, socks you
with an infectious semi-British In-
vasion pop wallop. Lead singer
Michael Quercio comes on like a

disturbed Davey Jones. for friends wanting opinions on
But there is a stronger link between clothing purchases. But ask someone
the bands. Both are currently en- who just bought their first album by
joying huge success with their latest either of the bands, and they'll bubble
records. R.E.M.'s fourth record, incessantly about the brilliance of the
Fables of the Reconstruction, is per- writing, the beauty of the singing, the
ched atop the college album charts. swell production, and everything else
The Three O'Clock's first major label that makes the records as good as
release, Arrive Without Travelling, is they are.
at number seven. While these albums And the records are good, even if
have garnered much more publicity they're not as brilliant as one might
than earlier efforts, they also have want them to be. The records are dif-
sent tremors of uncertainty into each, ferent, but that doesn't mean that the
of the bands' longtime fans. bands have lost the essential
Ask a longtime fan of either band somethings that made them
what they think of the latest record, treasured secrets.
and they'll reply, "Well, it's dif-
ferent!" in a tone normally reserved See BANDS, Page9

irrepiaca D Doily Photo by DOUG MCMAHON
Paul Westerberg, lead singer and guitarist for the Replacements, takes a
seat during the band's opening gig at last October's X concert at the
Michigan Theater. Last January the band signed with Sire records, and
their first Sire album is due late this fall. The band's most recent release,
on Twin/Tone, is a live cassette entitled 'The Shit Hits the Fans.' The
cassette contains almost an entire performance by the band which was
illegally recorded by an overzealous fan, and subsequently confiscated by
a roadie. The Replacements will play The Nectarine Ballroom at 10 p.m.,
Wednesday, August 21. Get Tickets at the Union Ticket Office,
Schoolkid's, P.J.'s, or Ticketworld outlets.

E
6

1

EATS

AND

DRINKS

FORBIDDEN CITY
(3535 Plymouth Rd.; 665-3591;
4905 Washtenaw Ave.; 434-7978)
Excellent in the ancient tradition of Man-
darin, Sze Chuan, and Hunan specialties.
Attentive service, a full service bar with a
complete wine menu and exotic cocktails.
Open 7 days a week.
PIZZA BOB'S ~
(814 S. State St.; 665-4517)
Ann Arbor's best milkshakes, __
great subs, and
pizza. We practically invented chipatis!
Pizza pasties. FREE DELIVERY. 11 a.m.-
2 p.m., 4 p.m.-l:30 a.m. EVERY DAY.

ei flb*
- f "2 s ';)

TACO BOB'S
(810 S. Stae St.; 996-TACO)
New ideas in Mexican food including:
Salads, Chimichangas, Buritos. Hours: 11
a.m.-2 a.m. Mon.-Sat., Noon-Midnight
Sunday.
LUNCH DELIVERY and
NIGHT DELIVERY
eats & drinks
your guide to dining for
both the visitor and
the longtime resident
of the city.
KANA
Fine Korean cuisine - family restaurant
Some hot-spicy Korean foods available.
/ours: M-FII a m. -9p.m.
Sat. 5p.m.-t.10p.m.
1133 E. Huron,
Ann Arbor 662-9303

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