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November 04, 2014 - Image 2

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2 - Tuesday, November 4, 2014

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.com a]

2 - Tuesday, November 4, 2014 The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom

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6

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n a
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530 S. State Street 1608 S. University Avenue 926 Mary Street
Community High School Palmer Commons University Coliseum
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625 Main Street

Adidas collaborates

Panelists talk missing.

with 'U' researchers Mexican students

Kinesiology School much of the project, which he
says has benefitted student-ath-
enlists help of student etes, coaches, researchers and
Adidas.
athletes to test, The program started three
years ago when Adidas, a Ger-
ppr s man athletic equipment compa-
ny valued at $12 billion, wanted
By JULIA LISS to boost it's involvement with
Daily StaffReporter traditionally North American
sports like football and basket-
On top of Adidas' apparel con- ball, and identified the Univer-
tract with the University Athlet- sity as an ideal research partner,
ic Department, the company has Goulet said. Kinesiology Dean
also been working closely with Ron Zernicke already had a rela-
the University's School of Kine- tionship with the company.
siology on research focused on Some research projects test
athletes' apparel needs. Adidas' wares, like a certain type
Over the past three years, of running shoe or compression
Kinesiology researchers have suits, while other studies do not
enlisted the help of student-ath- concern an Adidas product and
tetes to better understand what are simply meant to garner a bet-
products and features work, ter understanding of athletes'
don't work and need improve- needs.
ment when it comes to athletic A current study undertaken
equipment. Assistant Research by Goulet and his team will
Scientist Grant Goulet oversees examine the effect of a running
S MO

shoe's cushioned thickness on
performance and the physi-
cal impact that is transmitted
through the body.
"It's purely just to develop a
better understanding of running
and how some properties of foot-
wear could affect risk of injury
and things like that," Goulet
said.
Goulet emphasized that play-
ers and coaches benefit from
their participation through the
information obtained from the
data. One example he cited was
a study that involved football
players wearing sensors while
developing an Adidas product
called Speedcell, which is a
sensor worn in the shoe. Using
the data from this research, the
team was able to learn how far
they were running during prac-
tice and how that compared
with how far they actually ran
in a game.
One challenge Goulet he
anticipated was that Adidas
might not want to hear criticism
of their products. He said he was
happy to find that this wasn't the
case, as the team of researchers
he works with at Adidas focuses
solely on innovation. They are
separate from those who bring
products to market and sell
them.
"Fortunately, we are work-
ing with a team who's genuinely
interested in bettering the prod-
uct." Goulet said..
Though the contract between
the two groups is renewed on a
two-year basis, Goulet does not
see any end to this partnership
in sight, as long as all parties are
continuing to benefit from the
research.
VOTE
TO DAY!
#umichvotes
FREEDOM RULES

,.

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forced
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reforn
not be
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ing 43
Prof..
a pan
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at the
and Jo
iting s
has liv
In 1
dents'
mayor
ished
a wary
is in tl
rero,
cartel
years.
found
not yE
remai
Invest
police
the M
reros
of the
provi
more i
The
70 pe
Latin
Studie
Ethni
spons

lice corruption, Institute, the Latina/o Studies
Program and the Romance Lan-
artel violence guages and Literature depart-
ments. A vigil was held at the
)lague nation's Diag after the event.
"We have been brought here
outhlern states by together to'talk about these
missing 43 students, but this is
By ANASTASSIOS not an anomaly unfortunately,"
ADAMOPOULOS De Le6n said. "It's been happen-
Daily StaffReporter ing for a very, very long time and
it's unfortunate that it takes this
September, authorities sort of event to raise attention in
Mexican city of Iguala the U.S. media."
1 43 students from the However, he noted, many
inapa Normal School into of these challenges are related
ice vans after a protest to broader global processes,
st rising university costs including U.S. foreign policy.
government education "As a community we want
Es. The 43 students have to understand the gravity and
en seen since. also the horror of what is going
event held Monday at the on, and understand better the
rsity's School of Social situation of students who are
focused on Mexico's Miss- fighting for economic and social
I. Associate Anthropology justice in Mexico," said Alexan-
Jason De Leon moderated dra Minna Stern, director of the
el that featured speakers Latin American and Caribbean
Pensado, director of the Studies department.
American Studies program Pensado presented on the
University of Notre Dame similarities and differences
orge Najera Godinez, a vis- between Mexico today and
tudent from Guerrero who Mexico of the 1960s, focusing
ed in Iguala. on 1968 when student move-
the weeks since the stu- ments were also taking place.
disappearance, Iguala's However, the student move-
, Jose Luis Abarca, van- ments were much less popular
after authorities issued than current activities. Today,
rant for his arrest. Iguala the movements are largely
he Mexican state of Guer- non-partisan and unsupportive
which has been a center of of political parties in general,
-related violence in recent attracting students from Mex-
Mass graves have been ico's elite universities, conser-
, but investigators have vative and Catholic students, as
et been identified as the well as participants from both
ns of the missing students. sides of the political spectrum.
igators say that the local "What I want to emphasize
delivered the students to today is a sense of optimism that
exican drug cartel Guer- I see," Pensado said. "I've been
Unidos. Four members fascinated by the social upris-
cartel were arrested and ing that has developed not only
led the investigators with in Mexico City but across the
information on the case. nation and across the world in
event, which drew about support of the people of Guer-
ople, was hosted by the rero, but also to sort of question
American and Caribbean and pressure the Mexican state
s department and Multi- to finally transform its system
c Student Affairs and co- so that things like this will not
ored by the International happen again."

Pensado noted that there are
two options that could follow: a
peaceful social movement or an
armed uprising.
"Every time there is a mas-
sacre in the state of Guerrero, it
has been followed by a guerilla
uprising," Pensado said.
Pensado noted that in Guer-
rero today, citizens have essen-
tially two governments, the
actual state and the narco-state,
meaning citizens often pay taxes
to both authorities as the link
between legal and illegal activity
becomes increasingly blurred.
"What you have now is peo-
ple directly associated with the
narco- trafficking and so on,
running for elections and win-
ning elections," Pensado said.
"And this is something that was
really unheard of if you think of
Mexico's 'dirty war' of the 1970s
for instance."
He noted that in his expe-
rience people in Mexico have
three reactions toward the
situation: fear, distrust of gov-
ernment and anger that is espe-
cially prevalent among youth.
Pensado noted that 47 out of
Mexico's 81 municipalities have
developed self-defense bri-
gades.
Godniez, who spoke partly
in Spanish via a translator, was
awarded a scholarship to study
at the University.
"I just arrived here two
months ago and am planning
to come back to study my Ph.D.,
but I want to go back to my
community to help my people,"
Godinez said.
Godinez noted that what hap-40
pened in Iguala happens else-
where in Mexico. The normal
schools in the region, where he
noted that being an indigenous
person is a requirement to gain
admission, are the poorest in
Guerrero. He also said that the 0
indigenous students are some
of the most marginalized in the
state.
Read the full story at
michigandaily.com

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