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September 15, 1993 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-09-15

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2 -- The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, September 15, 1993

Savi

/ / et
4 /

Fayez Tarawneh, Jordan's ambassador to the United States (left), shakes hands with Elyakim Rubinstein, head of the Israeli
delegation to the Jordan-Israel peace talks, after they signed a peace agreement at the State Department yesterday.

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PEACE
Continued from page 1
and Indonesia might be in the offing.
Such ties may have to awaitprogress
on the issue of Jerusalem, the third-
holiest city in Islam and site of the
Dome of the Rock and al-Aqsamosque.
Palestinians want the Arab sector to be
the capital of a Palestinian state, but
Israel insists on sovereignty over all of
the holy city.
Even if formal ties aren't achieved
with other nations, Novick said their
governments might at least be open to a
"more reasonable relationship" that
would allow freer travel and trade.
Improving ties with North African
Mo-Jo
Continued from page 1
storing and replying to messages and
transferring messages to other students
equipped with voice mail.
"You can send messages directly to
a person's voice mail without ringing
their phone and you can make lists and
send messages to 20 people," said LSA
junior and Mo-Jo ResidentAdvisorEric
Neal.
Unlike answering machines, voice
mail provides users with privacy when
listening to messages. The voice mail-
box can be set up so each roommate has

states in particular could help Rabin's
shaky coalition government galvanize
support for the PLO-Israel accord when
the issue goes to parliament for ap-
proval next Monday.
The Shas party has a large following
among Jewish immigrants from North
Africa, who number more than 750,000
and are the second-largest bloc in Israel
after the Russians.
A good showing in Morocco could
shore up support for Rabin.
"We did not give up on our land, and
we established relations with India,"
said Eliahu Ben-Elissar, a Likud parlia-
ment member. "Without recognizing
Arafat, we established relations with
China. We didn't have to extend our
hand to Arafat, that killer, to establish
an individualmailbox.
"You can only put one answering
machine on a telephone in the residence
hall room. It does not allow for pri-
vacy," Levy said.
With voice mail, multiple residents
can receive their own messages at pri-
vate voice mailboxes within the same
phone number.
Residents are being offered the ser-
vice at no cost.
Mo-Jo was chosen as the voice-
mail test site because it has a substantial
returning student population.
Levy said, "Mosher-Jordan has the
largest returning population of any of
the residence halls in our system."
Mo-Jo has 510 residents, with 85
percent of residents returning from last
year.
No new wiring was required in Mo-
Jo to accommodate the voice mail sys-
tem.
Students will be asked to evaluate
the system in the middle of the year to
see if it improves the quality of life in
University housing and if there is inter-
est in expanding the service, Levy said.
If voice mail is expanded to other
residence halls, a cost will have to be
assessed.
"We don't know whether it will be
an optional service like we're handling
cable TV or if it will be built into the
room and board fee," Levy said.
Students have expressed satisfac-
tion with the new voice mail system.
"I like it; it's just like an answering

relations with Russia.
"You know what? I'm not im-
pressed."
After Israel's victory over threeArab
armies in the 1967 Mideast war, Arab
states campaigned for diplomatic isola-
tionoftheJewish state. They succeeded
in getting 29 African countries and all
the Soviet bloc nations to go along.
Most have now restored ties.'There
are signs that one of the holdouts, Zim-
babwe, will reconsider. Foreign Minis-
ter Nathan Shamuyarira was quoted in
the Herald in Harare that his country
would review ties after the PLO-Israel
accord.
"The issue of isolation is less in the
consciousness of Israelis of the 1990s
than it was in the 1960s and '70s."

Located at the intersection of 1-94 and Ann Arbor-Saline Road, exit 175

machine.... My roommate was plan-
ning on getting an answering machine
but we don't need it now that we have
voice mail," said LSA sophomore and
Mo-Jo resident Franz Schmelzer.
LSA sophomore and Mo-Jo resi-
dent Kellie McFarlin agreed, "It's bet-
ter than an answering machine, the
messages are clearer and youdon'thave
to worry about a tape."
However, some residents have been
critical of the new voice mail system.
"There's no beeping so you don't
know if you have a message," Neal said.
Victor Chen, an LSA fifth-year se-
nior and Mo-Jo resident director, added,
"A lot of our residents have been fairly
inconvenienced by it.... It took a while
for them to learn how to use the sys-
tem."
The University is not the only insti-
tution to provide voice mail service for
residents.
At the College of William and Mary
in Virginia, students also have a voice
mail system.
"All students living in campus hous-
ing have voice mail," said Jeff Gaynor,
a junior at the College of William and
Mary.
Installed four years ago, the voice
mail system at William and Mary also
has conference calling and call-waiting
features.
"Ijust love these telephones. I think
everybody does. Before, we had pay
phones in the halls for twenty resi-
dents," Gaynor said.

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HEWLETT
PACKARD

Tne Micnigan Daily (IS r4SN045967))is puoisneaMonday through lraay auring me ra ana winter terms by
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STAFF: Adam Anger, Jonathan Berndt, James Cho, Kenneth Dancyger, Jen DiMascio, Erin Einhom, Michelle Fricke, Soma Gupta,
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