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April 13, 1993 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1993-04-13

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*1

Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Tuesday, April 13, 1993

E -

The grass is always greener in the SilverdomeO
World Cup Michigan President Roger Faulkner stands on grass that will be used for the World Cup playoffs in June 1994. The first of seven trucks
carrying 15,000 square feet of sod arrived at the Silverdome yesterday. The grass will be used for a soccer match between Germany and England.

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BOSNIA
Continued from page 1
of the barrage. IHe said 10 of the 68
wounded were near death.
Srebrenica officials reported more
than 50 dead and at least 80 wounded.
Sarajevo radio said two villages near
Srebrenica fell to the Serbs.
The beleaguered Muslim enclave
was shelled after Gen. Sefer Halilovic,
commander of Bosnia's loyalist forces,
refused to meet with Gen. Ratko Mladic,
his Bosnian Serb counterpart, to discuss
INAUGURATION
Continued from page 1
Hunter (D-1 st Ward) declined it saying
he had filled the position before, but
adding, "I hope we can elect a member
of the Democratic caucus."
He got his wish.
"I look forward to working with
(Ingrid) collaboratively," Peterson said
after the unanimous vote.
Peterson, who now ranks second in
seniority on council behind Hunter, said
she thought the position might take on a
little more to help cross party lines.
"I hope it would be a communica-
tion link," she said, adding she could act
as a "funnel" for ideas between the two
caucuses.
"Ingrid and I have worked together
before and been successful," Peterson,
said referring to when the two served on
council together. "I think we will be
again."
PP IH
Continued from page 1
However, students at the hearing
stressed the necessity of a specific de-
partment to address their needs - both
academic, and personal, in the areas of
peer and faculty support.
Another common concern was the
imminent loss of competitiveness and
funds the University will face if PPIH
closes.
"(PlPIl) is highly regarded interna-
tionally and has brought in major fund-
ing," said Natural Resources Prof. Bobbi
Low, echoing the statements of many
other speakers, who pointed out PPIH's

a truce for Srebrenica.
U.N. officials said sporadic fire from
Srebrenica's defenders might have pro-
voked the Serb shelling.
Mortar explosions also resounded
in Sarajevo. The republic's health min-
istry said 29 people were killed and 400i
wounded across Bosnia over the previ-
ous 24 hours, not including the
Srebrenica casualties.
President Clinton's envoy, Reginald
Bartholomew, arrived in Sarajevo for
the first of three days of talks with
Muslim, Serb and Croat leaders.
Councilmember Peter Nicolas (D-
4th Ward), whose name was circulated 0
for the position, said he was not worried
about it.
"It's not something worth. fighting
for. I would rather we move along to
other issues," he said, adding that the
budget process, which starts this week-
end with staff proposals, should be the
focus of the council's first debates.
Sheldon said thatprocess wouldneed
a lot of "reading and exploring," espe-
cially by the new councilmembers as0
the council sets spending priorities.
Lumm agreed, "Thepiorities should
be back to basic services. We need to set
spending priorities and spend accord-
ingly."
Stead said he would bring a resolu-
tion concerning Earth Day, April 22,
and would also pay close attention to
the westside parking study, which will
be examined next week at the new 0
council's first working session.
recent growth in popularity.
"I have seen in my classes students
are increasingly interested in classes on
population planning," said Jacquelyn
Miller, an SNRE sophomore, who
stressed the importance of a distinct
department to address the issues.
Christine Kolars, a secondyear !
PPIH graduate student, said she is hope-
ful about the future of PPIH.
"I have confidence the University
will see beyond the shortsightedness of
its decision. I believe in the objective-
ness of the review committee, but the
provost will have to prove he can live up
to (the objectiveness)," she said. "The
decision cannot be turned back to the
dean."An

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