100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 03, 1992 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1992-03-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

0

Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Tuesday, March 3, 1992

DEMOCRATS
Continued from page 1
large numbers in both states.
The two states are among seven
that hold primaries or caucuses to-
day, with 383 Democratic delegates
at stake.
Tsongas is counting on a strong
day to propel him into the South,
where Clinton is expecting to get a
needed psychological boost.
"The criticism against me has
been that my ideas are regional and
that's why the Maryland and
Colorado elections are important -
to show you can compete in other
parts of the country," Tsongas told
voters in Greenbelt, Md., yesterday.
"I am a prisoner of your expecta-
tions and judgments," he said. "I
have to do well here."
Clinton promises a win in
Georgia today but says he may have
gotten his stride back too late to
overcome Tsongas in Colorado and
Maryland. The other contests, in

Washington, Minnesota, Idaho and
Utah, are unpredictable, he says.
Clinton said yesterday as he
campaigned in Maryland, "I think
we'll see a real turnaround in this
election."
"In the aftermath of New
Hampshire, my economic message
was totally wiped away," he said. He
was forced to defend himself against
unsubstantiated allegations of infi-
delity and suggestions he manipu-
lated a deferment to avoid the
Vietnam draft. "People are begin-
ning to get back to the issues and are
listening to my message again."
Maryland and Colorado are sig-
nificant not only because they are
the first major tests of the Democrats
outside their home regions, but both
are considered bellwethers of
Democratic chances in the fall.
Clinton's strategy is to contrast
his economic proposals with those of
Tsongas. He casts Tsongas' propos-
als as "1980s economics" and tells
voters, "We need something new

and different for the 1990s and be-
yond. He wants to put capital first. I
want to put people first."
Clinton says he is confident he
can win among Democratic voters if
the debate with Tsongas is over eco-
nomics.
Tsongas' success among profes-
sionals clearly grates Clinton, who
viewed this constituency as a natural
part of what he calls his "new coali-
tion for change."
Tsongas' attempts to cut into
Clinton's Black support also are a
sore point, with Clinton accusing his
rival of using the very negative tac-
tics that Tsongas himself has de-
nounced.
Black voters are critical for a
Clinton comeback in Maryland, and
to Clinton's margins in the South,
where he has to win big to cement
his regional strength heading into
nine more Southern primaries next
week on Super Tuesday.

Calvin and Hobbes

IF TH4ERE RE No QUESTIONS,
WE ~L MOVE. OR To TW EX
0 8
0 0 0O
00 O O00
QO 0 O O

CiRVm~A\, *ANT HE
CAN N . POWN OF
wua\5 \' ? HUMAN
ENSTP1,

I MEANT ANY QVESTtoNS
ABOUT THE SQKJ (-T Ac WAD.
oN.
0
O O
C 00
O 0 O
O O
O O O IL
O
Q
O O
0

by Bill Watterson
FRNAKL, D L\ME To "N4E
TWE \5UE RESouvED BEEORE
I EXPEND NM MARE ENERGY
OK TW\S -.
a
313,

NEGATIVE
Continued from page 1
bill that allegedly included hiring
quotas. Bush ads have focused on
Buchanan's supposedly questionable
support for the Gulf War, and accu-
sations that Buchanan made state-
ments that women were psychologi-
cally unsuited for some jobs.
The attacks on Tsongas, which
came to a point during a heated ex-
change in Saturday night's Colorado
debate, have focused on his support
for nuclear energy.
In that debate, Clinton accused
Tsongas of planning to build
"hundreds" more nuclear power

I

WRITE FOR TIE DAILY
WRITE FOR SPORTS WRITE FOR
NEWS WRITE FOR ARTS WRITE
FOR OPIONON WRITE FOR TH E
MICHIGAN DAILY
764-0552

WMMMM9

plants, to which Tsongas retorted,
"That is a lie, that is a lie, that is a
lie."
Clinton continued, "No one can
argue with you, Paul. You're always
'I'm not perfect. But
I'm honest.'
- Paul Tson gas
perfect," to which Tsongas re-
sponded, "I'm not perfect. But I'm
honest."
In Sunday night's Maryland de-
bate, Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin and
former California Gov. Jerry Brown
POLICE
Continued from page 1
seven officers without stripping the
streets of protection."
"To me, it was a management
glitch that we have worked out and
we will continue to work well to-
gether, probably on a much better
scale than before," he said. "We
have good working operations with
them, but part of the problem is that
there were too many expectations of
both sides."
Smith said that based on a meet-
ing Tuesday between University and
city officials, he expects positive re-
lations between the two forces.
"It was a good discussion,"
agreed Gatta. "We identified areas
for improvement to ensure good re-
lations and discussed what led to the
problems that occurred Friday morn-
ing and ways to avoid them in the
future."
Gatta said participants at the

Andrew M. Levy/DAILY GRAPHIC
attacked Clinton on the environmen-
tal record of his native Arkansas.
Harkin criticized it as "a joke,"
stating that Arkansas is consistently
ranked toward the bottom of national
environmental surveys. Brown
brought up several newspaper clip-
pings which criticized Clinton's en-
vironmental record.
Clinton defended his record by
saying that his state is one of just
three states currently in compliance
with federal clean air provisions, and
was among the first states to comply
with clean water regulations. The
governor warned voters to look at
the record, and not to listen to
"people behind in the polls."
meeting agreed on the need for bet-
ter communication between the city
and the University before major
events and a focus on preparedness
and preventative measures.
'The University must
understand the day-to-
day operations before
it makes... demands.'
- Douglas Smith
Ann Arbor police chief
The current contract requires the
University to pay about $500,000
annually for city protection. In re-
turn, the city agrees to provide po-
lice protection.
Gatta said the 40-page contract is
being reevaluated "in light of the
fact that the University is completely
in control of the force," and will be
completed by July 1.

Frederick W. Gehring
T. H. Hildebrandt
Distinguished University Professor of Mathematics
At the Crossroads
March 3
Mathematics, Research, and
the Outside World
March 10
Groups, Beyond Mandelbrot,
and "Not Knot"
4:30 PM
Rackham Amphitheatre
All lectures are open to the public
A reception in the Rackham Assembly Hall
will follow the second lecture

HOUSING
Continued from page 1
He said the existing bipartisan
Housing Policy Board has already
been working for affordable housing
and "this resolution would only cir-
cumvent all of their work."
Dodge said the $870,000 would
have likely gone to the Housing
Policy Board had last night's resolu-
tion never been procured.
"They want something they can
call their own," said Dodge about
the current Democrat majority on

the council.
Jeri Schneider, a member of the
Homeless Action Committee which
regularly addresses the council to
demand more low-income housing,
said she hopes the money is spent on
effective programs, and not on rent
subsidies. These would mostly bene-
fit land owners, she said.
"The best use for this money
would be either construction or pur-
chasing housing for low income
people," Schneider said.
Hunter said he does not know
exactly how the money will be
spent.

0

-SU MM ER SC H O OL
1992
e orgetown

U N I

V E R S I T

Y

0

MAY 18-JUNE 12
JUNE 8-JULY 10
JUNE 8-JULY 31
JULY 13-AUGUST 14

PRE-SESSION
FIRST SESSION
EIGHT-WEEK CROSS SESSION
SECOND SESSION

The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) Is published Monday through Friday during the Fall and Winter terms by
students at the University of Michigan. On-campus subscription rate for fall/winter 91-92 is $30; all other
subscriptions via first class U.S. mail, winter semester only, are $80. Subscriptions must be prepaid.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and the Associated Collegiate Press.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1327.%
PHONE NUMBERS (All area code 313): News 764-0552; Opinion 747-2814; Arts 763-0379; Sports 747-3336;
Circulation 764-0558; Classified advertising 764-0557; Dspyadetin74-5 ;Biin74-5.
NEWS Henry Goldblatt, Managing Editor
EDiTORS: DaWdRhalngokl, BeUrenyRobertson, Sfelanie Vine, Kenneh Waker
STAFF: Lad Barager, Hope Calai, Barry Cohen, Ben Devi, Lauren Dommer, Erin Elohomn, Rend. Hucide, Loretta Loo, Andrew Levy,
Robin Ltwin, Nicole Malenfank Travis McReynolds, Joseh Moler, Melissa Peerless, Karen Pier, Mona Qursei, Karen Sabglr,
Chreispher Scherer, Gwen Shaffer, Purvi Shah, Jennifer Silverberg, David Wartoweki, Chaslity Wilson.
UIST: David Shepardeon
OPINION Yael Citro, Geoff Eare, Amitava Mazumdar, Editors
STAFF: Ma't Ad'er. Jenny Al'x-RRne Bu"hey" Daren Hubbard, David Leitner. Jennifer Matheon, Ad Rotenberg, Dave Rowe, David
Shepardeon. Steve Small, Daniel Stewart
SPORTS John Niyo, Managing Editor
EDITORS: JoshDubow, Albet in, JeffWmns
STAFF: Andy DeKorte, Kimberly DeSempelaere. Matthew Dodge, Shawn DuFreene, Jeni Durst, Jim Foss, Ryan Herrington, Mike Hill,
Bruce Inosendo, Dan in , Rod Loewenhul, Sharon Lund", Adam Mtiler, Rich ivalsky, Bemadeth Ramsey, Mike Randio, Tim
Rarin, Chad Safran. Todd Schoenhaus. Jeff Shoran, Tern Spcdar, Andy Staile, Ken Sugiura.
ARTS Elizabeth Lenhard, Michael John Wilson, Editors,
EDITORS: Mark SineE(Ffn), Diane Fdeden (Rne & Performing Arts), Alan J. Hogg, Jr. (Books), Jute Komom (Weekendetc),
Annedte Pefnjso (Mursic).
STAFF: Nick Avin, Greg Bales, Margo Baumgart, Skot BealJen Biik, Andrew J. Cean, Jonathan Chalt, Jenie Dahimann, Richard S.
Davis, Gabil Feldberg, Rosanne Freed, Forrest Green iII, Jessie Haliaday, Aaron Hamburger, Stephen Henderson, Jonathan
Higgins, Nima Hodai, Made Jacobson, Andrea Kachudas, Kristen Knudsen, Chris Lepley, Kristen McMurphy, Amy Meng, Josh
Minidck, John Morgan, Midselle Phiip, Dan Poux, Austin Rainer, Jeff Rosenberg, Christinae Slovey, Scot Steding, Allen Strauss,
Sarah Weidrman, Josh Worh.
PHOTO Kristoffer Gillette, Kenneth J. Smoller, Editors
STAFF: Brian Cantoni, Anhiony M. Crod, Mchelle Guy, Doug Kanter, Heather Lowman, Sharon Musher, Susie Paley, Moly Stevens,
Paul Taylor.

During the summer months Georgetown Univer-
sity's School for Summer and Continuing Education
offers more than 300 regular graduate and under-
graduate courses for all students. Visiting students
from other colleges and universities can earn credits
which are ordinarily transferrable to their own degree
programs. Summer courses are taught by members of
Georgetown's distinguished faculty and other visiting
scholars.
Enrollment is open to all students in good standing
at Georgetown and all other collegesand universities,
foreign students with a TOEFL score of 550 or above
(600 for linguistics courses) and individuals whose
educational background and experience qualify them
for the courses they wish to take.
Catalogues along with the application form are avail-
able by phone request 202-687-5942, fax request 202-

01

DISPLAY SALES Shannon Burke, Manag
ASSISTANT MANAGER: Larl naon
STAFF: Grog An6Hs, Alizahi Baharin. Michaul Barry.amin Chawidhrv. MeeanCleay..ina fDas . Du. ~Amv Fa Shi

er

0

I I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan