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September 13, 1991 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1991-09-13

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Friday, September 13, 1991

AUDIT
Continued from page 1
direct research expenses for gov-
ernment compensation.
"Some of the things they ques-
tion are things that involve private
tips... and entertainment types of
things that are questionably related
to research and questionable from a
public administrative standpoint."
The indirect cost recovery rate is
negotiated by a university and either
HHS or the Department of Defense,
establishing a fixed percentage for
costs not related directly to re-
search expenditures to be compen-
sated by the Federal Government.
The University's indirect cost
recovery rate is 57 percent for fiscal
year 1992. So if the University re-
ceives a $100,000 research grant, it
receives $57,000 from the Federal
Government to cover costs indi-
rectly related to its research.
Regent Philip Power (D-Ann
Arbor) said that out of the $300,000
being questioned by the HHS, he
found only $50,000 that could be
considered a questionable use of re-
search funds.
"You don't like to see any mis-
takes, but in the context of the

politicization, in the context the
draft report was leaked, and in the
context of the amount of activity
that goes on at the University, I
think we came out looking damn
well," Power said.
Of the $50,000 which Power
found questionable he said, "You'll
never fix (the $50,000), someone is
always going to screw up."
The audit process will continue
as scheduled. University officials
'You don't like to see
any mistakes, but in
the context of the
politicirption ... I think
we came out looking
damn well'
- Phil Power,
University Regentt
have been examining the audit since
they received it in late August.
Their response will contain chal-
lenges to any figures they find ques-
tionable.
A university normally takes 30
to 60 days to respond to a draft au-
dit, Talesnik said.

'U' celebration marks Hispanic heritage

by Robert Patton
Daily Minority Issues Reporter
"Latinos Moving Beyond
Boundaries" is the theme of this
year's Hispanic Heritage celebra-
tion, which features more than a
month of speakers, films, music, and
dance, beginning tomorrow.
"The main purpose of the event
is to showcase and share our contri-
butions to history," said Kathy
Berdy, Hispanic representative to
Minority Student Services.
"By the year 2,000, Hispanics
will be the largest minority in the
country," she said, adding that many
Americans know little about
Hispanic culture.
"We'd particularly like to edu-
cate students about the diversity
within Hispanic culture," Berdy
said. "There are Hispanics from
Central America, Latin America,
and the Caribbean, and Hispanic-
Americans who have lived here all
their life.
"Many people don't know about
these differences," she added.
At the same time, Berdy said, she
wants the "concept of unity" to be a
key part of the celebration.
"(Hispanics) have the common
bond of our language, and we need to
use this to move forward as a peo-
ple, beyond the boundaries set by

others and by history," she said.
The celebration kicks off tomor-
row night at Trotter house with a
Puerto Rican Bienvenida dance and
an informal talk with noted film
director Marcus DeLeon. Events run
until Oct. 19.
On Oct. 2, Carlos Fuentes, one of
the most respected and distin-
guished Hispanic authors today,

will speak on "The Buried Mirror:
Reflections on the Culture of Spain
and the New World."
Other highlights include lec-
tures on "Bilingual Education Laws
and their Effect on Learning," on
Sept. 20, "Latinos and AIDS," on
Sept. 26, and "Legal and Political
Perspectives on Puerto Rico's
Colonial Status," on Oct. 8.

ENROLLMENT
Continued from page 1
students financially throughout
their four years in school.
"I know several students who
drop out every year because they
don't have enough money," she said.
Asian American students said
they felt some tension on campus,
but certainly less than other mi-
norities experience.
"I don't think there's any racism
towards Asians as much as there is
towards Blacks," said Julie Chang,
an Engineering sophomore.
Chang suggested the University
should continue efforts to educate
people about different cultures,
such as the current Hispanic Her-
itage Celebration. Otherwise, she
said, it just takes time to change
people's attitudes.
For the past three years, the Uni-
versity has followed an agenda to
increase diversity known as the
Michigan Mandate. In a new state-
ment on the mandate released earlier
this week, President James Duder-

stadt defined the purpose of the
plan.
"The fundamental goal of the
Michigan Mandate is to make the
University of Michigan a leader
known for the racial and ethnic di-
versity of its faculty, students, and
staff," Duderstadt wrote.
The revised edition of the man-
date reports a 39 percent increase in
minority enrollment at the Univer-
sity during the past three years.
"The indication is that the rate
has been going up every year," Mat-
lock said. "We of course still have a
long way to go."
The revised mandate compares
1990 census data for the state of
Michigan and University enroll-
ment data for the 1990-1991 year.
While total minority enrollment at
the University has already exceeded
the percentage of minorities in the
state, not all minority groups are
proportionately represented.
Census figures indicate that the
state's population is 17.8 percent

"Hispanic students need to take
pride in their culture and non-
Hispanic students need to share that
culture," Berdy said. "Too often,*
.people's impression of Hispanics is
formed by misconceptions and
stereotypes," she added.
Students interested in informa-
tion should go to Minority Student
Services, Room 2304 in the Union.
people of color. Minority represen-
tations at the University in a num-
ber of student, faculty and staff cat-
egories is 18.3 percent. The state, for.
example, is 13.9 percent Black and
1.1 percent Asian American. In
comparison, the University was 7.1
percent Black and 7.5 percent Asian
American in 1990.
University officials said there is
no cap on the number of minorities
they will try to recruit.
"The goal is to be reflective of
the greater society," Shaw said.
"Certainly Michigan is important,
but what we're trying to look at is
some general parity with minority
representation."
Special Assistant to the Presi-
dent Shirley Clarkson agreed.
"We don't have quotas for any
group or restrictions," Clarkson
said. "The population is changing soi
rapidly that people who are a minor-
ity today will be a majority tomor-
row."

STUDY FOR ONE YEAR OR FOR ONE OR TWO TERMS IN
OXFORD
and live with British Students
HOW WISC IS DIFFERENT FROM MOST OVERSEAS PROGRAMS:
" Accepted students receive admissions letters (and later transcripts) directly
from an Oxford (or Cambridge) college.
students are directly enrolled as full students of the Oxford college.
. Qualified early applicants may share a co-ed Student Residence associated
with St. Catherine's College, Oxford (fully integrated with British students).
t Students accepted before November 1 (for the Winter Term) or before May 1
(for next year) are guaranteed housin with British s nts.
" Students will NOT be taught in (and receive transcripts from) an American
college operating in Oxford. WISC is one of the few completely integrated
(academically and in housing) overseas programs in the UK.
" Previous students in your field will speak to you on the phone.
For information, call or write:
THE WASHINGTON INTERNATIONAL STUDIES COUNCIL
214 Massachusetts Avenue N.E., Suite 450, Washington, DC 20002, (800) 323-WISC
Students may also Intern and Study in
Washington and London

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DOUBLE
FEATU RE

THOMAS
Continued from page 1
tions, Kohl asked Thomas, "Why is
it inappropriate for us to make an
evaluation of your career based on
all of what you have written and
said?"
Republicans on the committee
came to his defense, as did President
Bush who said at the White House
that Thomas was "doing a beautiful
job up there."
Sen. Orrin Hatch (R-Utah) com-
plained that Thomas had been asked
about abortion 70 times, compared
to the 36 questions about the issue
Religious
services
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Serving the U-M Campus for over 50 Years)
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
(one block south of CCRB)
668-7421662-2402
Rev. Don Postema, Pastor
SUNDAY WORSHIP:
Praise around the theme
'Wisdom for a New School Year'-10 a.m.
Evening Prayers:
"Who Do.You Say I am?-6 p.m.
WEDNESDAY:
Undergrad R.O.C.K. Group: Refreshments,
fun, provocative discussions-9-10:30 p.m.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
(The Epi Church of U-M)
(T eEiSUNDAYS:
Holy Eucharist-5 p.m. at
St. Andrew's church
Dinner-6 p.m. at Canterbury House
Canterbury House & St. Andrew's
(corner of Division and Catherine Street)
Call 665.0606
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
Huron Street (between State & Division)
SUNDAYS:
Worship-9:55 a.m.
Bible Study Groups-11:20 a.m.
WEDNESDAYS:
Student Fellowship Supper
and Bible Study-5:30 p.m.
For information, call 663-9376
Larry Greenfield, Minister
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
(Between Hll & South Unirsity)
SUNDAYS:
Worship-9:30 & 11 a.m.
Campus Faith Exploration Discussion,
Bagels & coffee served-9:30 a.m.
THURSDAYS:
Campus Worship & Dinner-5:30 p.m.
For information, call 662-4466
Amy Morrison, Campus Pastor
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LORDOF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA
801 South Forest (at HIl Street), 668-7622
SUNDAY: Worship-10'a.m.
WEDNESDAY: Evening Prayer-7 p.m.
Campus Pastor: John Rollefson
ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH
(A Roman Catholic Parish at U-M)
331 Thompson Street
SAT.: Weekd&d Liturgies-5 p.m., and
UN.:-8:30 a 7m., 10 a.m., 12noon,
5 p.m., and 7 p.m.
F.: Confessions-4-5 p.m.
SUIN..September 15: Welcome Dinner at
Newman Center-,5 p.m.,
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL-LCM
1511 Washtenaw
SUNDAY: Worship-10:30 p.m.
Supper-6 pm.
WEDNESDAY: Devotion-9 p.m.

that were asked last year at David
Souter's confirmation hearing.
Souter was confirmed despite his re-
fusal to answer such questions.
"I don't understand why you are
being treated any differently than
these other confirmable people,"
Hatch said.
A federal appeals judge since last
year, Thomas was nominated this
summer to replace resigning Justice
Thurgood Marshall. Both men are
Black, but Thomas has a strongly
conservative record opposed to
Marshall's liberalism.
Biden (D-Del.) expressed exas-
peration at Thomas' insistence dur-
ing three days of hearings that he es-
poused "natural law principles"
only as political theory, not as a po-
litical philosophy.
"That strikes me as something
different that what you said" in
many previous speeches, Biden told
Thomas.
"I have not in any speech said we
should adjudicate cases by directly
appealing to natural law," Thomas
told Biden.
When Republicans sought a brief
recess, Biden told Thomas: "Your
friends think you are getting into
trouble."
"That's not fair," said Sen. John
Danforth (R-Mo.), Thomas' prime
Senate sponsor who has sat behind
the nominee throughout his testi-
mony.
Danforth said Thomas had laid to
BUDGET
Continued from page 1
ing group in Lansing, said, "It is a
cut in a way because the universities
are going to have to make do until
they get the money."
Campbell said she thinks the
University will eventually get the
money.
"The Governor is committed to
education and I feel that that the
University will get the money. The

Thomas
ing to apply in unexpected and un-
predictable ways."
Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-Mass.)
pressed Thomas to tell him what
standard he would use in deciding an
abortion case, noting that Thomas
had already testified in support of a
test used to decide school prayer
disputes, including one the high
court will consider this fall.
Thomas refused to give such an
analysis "in this setting."
Outside the U.S. Capitol, Black
civil rights and religious groups
staged a rally to urge the Senate to
reject the nomination and "send him
back to Pin Point, Ga.," his home-
town.
Black groups that oppose
Thomas accused him of trying to ob-
scure his record by focusing atten-
tion on his poverty-stricken child-
hood in the rural, segregated South.
questionis how soon. Most likely it
will be next year," Campbell said.
Campbell agreed the University
is much better equipped to handle
the delay than are smaller universi-
ties.
"A place like the U of M has the
best ability to handle the delay be-
cause their budget is so huge. In a
way it is good for the University 0
because it can continue to overspend
and then it can ask for more money.
It's a strategy," she said.

i

rest fears "that he had in mind an
extra body of law ... that he was go-

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