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November 12, 1990 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-11-12

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily- Monday, November 12,1990

RACE
Continued from page 1
when it rains, and because it's so
flat, it can't drain off in time... For
a number of these solar cars, there
was too much water on the road."
"Then secondly, last night in that

horrendous storm, we had the ban-
ners and the light pole come across
the road at the start line," Phillips
said.
Team members thought they had
lost an advantage over their competi-
tors.
"Rumors have it that Maryland
and Honda are not waterproof...,"

said team member and engineering
senior Frank Stagg, who handles
fund raising and public relations.
"Losing this hour definitely took
away an advantage we could have
picked up,"
The Sunrunner nevertheless ran
efficiently.

LSA searches for new
geological studies. chair

Calvin pad Hobbes

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by Bill Watterson
I TOLD YOU KW H
114M C&AjU SPEWo kr
SAUJCE WAS Ali. ACROSS
lo o , I'- s

by Garrick Wang
Daily Staff Reporter
The University is searching
within the Geological Studies De-
partment for a new chair who can
help the program retain its under-
graduate majors.
Prof. Henry Pollack, the current
chair, decided last April not to con-
tinue as chair after his three-year
term expires in June. A term renewal
would interfere with his plans for a
two-term research sabbatical starting
this fall.
"It's a rewarding but a time con-
suming job," Pollack said. "I would
like to pass the baton to another able
and talented faculty member. That's
the principle of a rotating chair."
The 12-member LSA Executive
Committee, as mandated by the
University's Board of Regents, rec-
ommended possible candidates for
the position to LSA Dean Edie

Goldenberg last month.
Goldenberg, a member of the Ex-
ecutive Committee, said she will of-
fer the position to someone by the
beginning of next term.
"I'm looking for someone who is
a strong scholar who can be an effec-
tive leader in the department and take
a close look at the undergraduate and
graduate education for the next
decade," Goldenberg said.
The new chair will be involved in
reversing the steady decline of under-
graduate students pursuing geology
majors. Possibilities include revis-
ing the curriculum, methods of in-
struction, teaching labs, and number
of courses available.
The new chair will also decide
how to relieve the department's
space crunch after the Biology De-
partment completes its move into
the old Chemistry Building. The ex-
pansion within the C.C. Little

Building, where the Geology De-
partment is based, could include addi-
tional teaching labs and computing
spaces.
Goldenberg wrote letters to the
department's faculty in September,
asking for written nominations.
The committee member who read
the nomination letters with Golden-
berg presented a summary of the 1
ters to the rest of the committee 1S
month. The whole committee then
discussed the nominations and pre-
sented their recommendations to
Goldenberg.
"I have not yet met with a single
member of the faculty, but I am pro-
ceeding to invite people to talk to
me about being the new chair,"
Goldenberg said.
The Dean's office will send*
formal letter to the regents announc-
ing the selection of a new chair. The
regents will vote on the selection.

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Prof.

appointed director of

women's studies program

Nuts and Bolts
BEWEYE ME MRS.ROCiKprE1?
GNHILPReN LWVE 7HIS FUtMf'.y
THE CLOWN B(jT14E.U~ST
HAS To G,.

AT DON'.AT UER ISTAYND!1
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OVRI WE NEHELP.

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L-et g JUST 5SHAY Z DON'T
AGZE WIn- HIS
SOHEM/AN Ou7nc-Q .
fr-

by Judd Winick
-BTPESIDET NI oN STILL
MISSNG TA-r . j
ell T4P'PRAYER
ACCENT. ----

by Lynne Cohn
Daily Staff Reporter
Prof. Abigail Stewart, an active
member of the first generation of
Women's Studies advocates, has de-
voted her life to continuing the
search for female equality in the
classroom. She now has another
challenge ahead of her with her ap-
pointment as director of the Univer-
sity's Women's Studies Program.
Stewart, a Personality Psychol-
ogy and Women's Studies professor,
accepted the four-year term as Direc-
tor of the Program in Women's
Studies last June. She filled the po-
sition in September.
Stewart's position was created
following the recommendations of a

two-year Women's Studies Depart-
ment evaluation. The main objective
of the job is to implement three
goals in the Women's Studies Pro-
gram that evolved out of that evalua-
tion.
"The first goal is to bring re-
sources into the program to make it
possible for it to serve as an intellec-
tual community," Stewart said. "The
second is to ensure that the program
always has full participation of di-
verse, heterogeneous women, and the
third is to relieve volunteer adminis-
trative burdens that faculty and stu-
dents have had to take on in the
past."
Her new directorship allows

Stewart to continue teaching psy-
chology, although she will not be
teaching any Women's Studies
classes.
Stewart tried to create a Women's
Studies program at B.U. but regrets
that a viable program never evolved.
"I find it exciting and worthwhile
to finally have the chance to work at
an institution that has fantastic ps.
chology and Women's Studies pro-
grams," Stewart said. "I devote half
of my time to each subject."
"I anticipate the challenges that
this job offers me," Stewart said,
"and Iam eager to help the Women's
Studies Program fulfill its poten-
tial."

p

ep
The dirDction
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career should
be taking

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CLINIC
Continued from page 1
Heights resident Marie Schatz.
Nursing School Junior Debra
Pedyrs added, "God's laws are higher
than man's laws."
CDARR escorts met patients at
their cars, formed rings around them,
and maneuvered them through the
crowd and into the clinic through the
back door.
Of 14 patients who scheduled ap-
pointments, 11 entered the clinic. A
clinic nurse said the three patients
who did not "were probably
phonies." Clinic employees said that
these appointments may have been
made by pro-life activists in hopes
of monopolizing the time available
MAC
Continued from page 1
of revenues despite drawing large
crowds.
Gerald Cleaver, another member
of Tracey Science, said he felt there
was "an atmosphere of disdain" for
the band when they played at the U-
Club.
"Tracey Science agreed to play at
the U-Club for a month, under the
stipulation that if lots of people
came to our shows we could play
more," Cleaver said. Although the
band drew a very large crowd,
mainly students of color, Cleaver
said he feels the band never got "any
respect" from the management at the
U-Club.
Ann Lukens, Food Service Su-
pervisor at the U-Club, said the deci-
sion to not renew Tracey Science's
contract was "basically a program-

i
r
t
i
t
t

for abortions though not all of the
patients were scheduled to receive
abortions.
As pro-choicers chanted slogans
such as "Keep your rosaries off our
ovaries" and "Right to Life - your
name's a lie. You don't care if
women die," pro-lifers sang hymns.
"He's got the whole world in his
hands" became "He's got the unborn
babies in his hands. He's got the
Waterford police in his hands. He's
got Governor Engler in his hands..."
Both sides claimed victory in the
confrontation.
Michael Cooper, a student at
Eastern Michigan University and
member of Ann Arbor CDARR,
said, "This is very successful," he
said. "It's a big defeat for them.

They haven't tried a clinic attack '
ages." ,
The election of John Engler as
governer has increased determination
on both sides, said the event's partic-
ipants.
"It's just going to give us more
energy. It's made our job easier -
no more referendums, just simple
majority," Mills said.
"I hope he's a reasonable person.
I don't think you're going to stq
abortion - you're just going
send it to the back alley," the clinic
nurse remarked.
Advocates on both sides see no
compromise to the abortion issue.
The nurse added, "I don't see that
there is any middle ground. Can
anybody win this?"
heavy minority population, and w
try to cater to them. Why would 1
have hired them to begin with if it
was a racial issue?"
With the exception of Black fra-
ternities, students of color feel they
really don't have an outlet for get-
ting together in a social setting, said
Brett Hart, president of Alpha Phi
Alpha, a predominantly Black frater-
nity.
"The Office of Minority Affai
shouldn't have to provide live ban,
or other opportunities for Black stu-
dents to get together and dance. The
U-Club and University Activities
Center should do it on their own,"
Hart said.

ming move." and that "A Black
crowd coming in had nothing to do
with it."
Another U-Club manager said
they did not break even on the nights
Tracey Science performed. "They
were a great band, but unfortunately
we lose money," Kari Owens said.
Mitchell said the decision went
beyond the issue of profits. "We
draw a predominantly Black crowd,
so it was tense. Business is busi-
ness, but my feeling is that they
weren't comfortable with that many
people of color coming in there."
Lukens said the U-Club has been
trying to provide entertainment for
students of color. "We are very con-
scious of the fact that there is a

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math aptitude and a business orientation (math
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The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates via U.S. mail forfall andwinter $39
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The Equitable, a financial giant, is the third largest US life insurance
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A unique work-study summer internship is also available (housing
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Submit your resume November 12-27 at Career Planning and Placement
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Michigan Room.

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EITORIAL STAFF:
Editor in Chief Noah Finkel Sports Editor Mike Gil
Managing Editor Kristine LaLonde Associate Editors Andy Gottesman,
News Editors Diane Cook,.Ian Hoffmni David Hyman, Eric Lemnont,
Josh nEdk Mi Noele Vance Ryan Scheiber, Jeff Shoran
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Arts: Mark Bineli, Greg Baise, Andy Cahn, Beth Couilt, Jenie Dahlman, Michael Paui Fischer, Gregg Flaxman, Forrest Green li,
Brian Jarvinen, Mike Kdody, Mike Kuniavsky, Elizaeth Lenhard, David Lubliner, Mike Molitor, Jon Rosenthal, Lauren Turetsky, Sue
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