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March 27, 1990 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1990-03-27

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Page 2-The Michigan Daily-Tuesday, March 27, 1990
Contras agree to disarm

WASHINGTON (AP) - The
State Department welcomed yester-
day an agreement providing for the
demobilization of the Nicaraguan
Contras and called on the United Na-
tions to take steps to ensure the pro-
cess is carried out quickly and peace-
fully.
Under the agreement, reached Fri-
day, rebel forces based in Honduras
would be disarmed by April 20 while
those in Nicaragua would be de-
ployed in enclaves protected by in-
ternational observers.
The agreement also calls for an
internationally supervised cease fire
in Nicaragua.
State Department spokesperson
Margaret Tutwiler called the agree-

ment historic and congratulated the
parties involved, including the
Contra leadership, officials of the
Nicaraguan Roman Catholic Church
and representatives of President-elect
Violeta Chamorro, who will take
office April 25.
"We are pleased that the Sandin-
ista government has agreed to coop-
erate fully in implementing the ac-
cord," Tutwiler added.
The agreement is to be guaranteed
by the U.N. Observer Force for Cen-
tral America (ONUCA) and a sepa-
rate commission comprised of U.N.
and Organization of American presi-
dents.
"We would encourage the parties
to move forward as rapidly as possi-

ble," Tutwiler said. "Towards that
end, we urge the United Nations to
deploy an enlarged ONUCA force to
Nicaragua as rapidly as possible."
Left unclear fror. the agreement
was the time frame for demobilizing
the Contras who are in Nicaragua.
Published reports said yesterday that
they intend to remain in the enclaves
for months after Chamorro's
inauguration.
Tutwiler had no estimate of the
number of Contras inside Nicaragua
but President Daniel Ortega has said
the total is 4,000 to 6,000. He has
said that the Contras plan a big of-
fensive shortly before Chamorro's
inauguration.

Nuts and Bolts by Judcf Winick
EGAD MOVES
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TUITION
Continued from page 1
budget, including a $2 million in-
crease for recruitment and retention
of minority students and faculty, a
$2.4 million increase in student fi-
nancial aid, a $1 million expenditure
for undergraduate research initiatives
and building renewal.
In response to the $3 million al-
located in the University's budget for
building maintenance, Senator
William Sederburg (R-East Lans-
ing), chair of the committee, said,
"It seems you are picking up in your
campus budget what ought to be the
responsibility of the state."
According to the University's
budget proposal, an additional $6
million will be reallocated within
the University budget to cover
"restoration and new initiatives," in-
cluding additional funding for finan-
cial aid, undergraduate research op-
portunities and the College of Litera-
ture, Science, and Arts. The Univer-
sity also included a $10 million al-
location for "other critical needs,"
which it would fund as completely
as possible.
University officials also stressed
the need for capital outlay expendi-
tures. These expenditures are appro-
priated for the construction and reno-
vation of buildings.
Four capital projects were deter-
mined to be critical to the Univer-
sity. These include:
A renovation of the East
Engineering building ($27 million),
which would allow the psychology
and math departments to be housed
there.
Construction of the Integrated
Technology Center to be built on
North Campus ($34 million). This
building will contain library facili-
ties as well as "innovative design
and performance space and equipment
to be shared by students and faculty
of the four schools and colleges on
the North Campus."
An addition to the Randall
Laboratory ($22 million) to house
new research facilities for the
Physics department.
Renovation of the C.C. Little
Building ($15.5 million) to provide
additional laboratory areas.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and staff reports

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by Bill Watterson
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Man charged for killing 87
NEW YORK - The man accused of setting the city's worst fire in 79
years to the Happy Land social club was arraigned Monday on 87 counts
of murder, and police said he told them "the devil got into me."
The families of the 87 victims, most of whom were Honduran or
Dominican immigrants, sought solace in their grief, and a government
task force was set up to counsel them and help make funeral
arrangements.
Julio Gonzalez was accused of setting the fire early Sunday with only
$1 worth of gasoline after arguing w i) a former girlfriend who worked at
the illegal club. He is said to have threatened to "shut this place down."
During a hearing at Bronx County Criminal Court, Gonzalez was.
charged with 87 counts of murder committed during the course of arson;
87 counts of murder by depraved indifference to human life; one count of
attempted murder; and two counts of arson.
Honecker, Politburo leaders
escape charges of treason
EAST BERLIN - Prosecutors said yesterday there were no legal
grounds for charging Erich Honecker with high treason, but the deposed
Communist leader still was under investigation for corruption and abuse
of power.
The office of chief prosecutor Hans-Juergen Joseph said two members
of Honecker's Politburo -- state security chief Erich Mielke and Guenther
Mittag, the economics minister - also would escape treason charges but,
like Honecker, were suspected of corruption and misusing their power.
Prosecutors had said earlier that the three men would be indicted and
put on trial this month for high treason, which carries a maximum
sentence of life in prison.
Joseph's statement accused Honecker and his lieutenants of "persistent
breaches of the constitution." It added, however, that the actions were part
of a one-party Stalinist system and suggested treason charges against
individuals would be inappropriate.
Lawmakers propose new
doctor licensing procedures
LANSING - Disciplining Michigan's physicians takes so long that
doctors suspected of endangering patients continue practicing for as long
as two years before their case is completed, lawmakers said yesterday.
The House Ad Hoc Committee of Physician Licensure has proposed
separating licensure and discipline in the medical field, and having a single
discipline board that monitors all medical occupations and 200,000 li-
censed health care professionals.
Similar to the Liquor Control Commission, the board would include
five full-time members of the public appointed by the governor, and two
licensees.
The committee is recommending the state to set up regional review
boards comprised of doctors of the same specialty as the defendant and an
attorney. Those regional panels would present their fact-finding to the
main discipline board.
Gorbachev vows not to use force
LITHUANIA - Sen. Edward Kennedy said in Moscow that President
Mikhail Gorbachev reiterated his pledge not to use force except to save
lives in the Baltic republic, which declared independence March 11.
Soviet troops occupied another Communist Party building in
Lithuania and an army helicopter yesterday dropped leaflets in the
republic's capital, calling for an anti-secession demonstration, reports
said.
Lithuanian leaders began talks with the Soviet army about their stand-
off with Moscow since declaring independence two weeks ago. They dis-
agreed over whether the meeting reduced tension.
Lithuanian Deputy Premier Romualdas Ozolas, one of two top offi-
cials who met two Soviet military officers yesterday, told reporters: "After
coming out of this meeting, I can say the mood has changed."
"It is evident that the conflict will not be escalated," he said.
EXTRAS
Broccoli invades White House
WASHINGTON - There was broccoli, broccoli everywhere yesterday
at the White House - broccoli on the lawn, broccoli in the boutonnieres,
and broccoli in the bouquet in Barbara Bush's hand.
Everywhere, that is, except on President Bush's plate.
And that apparently is how it will stand given the president's
adamancy against the vegetable his wife and mother forced him to eat for
decades.
The broccoli lobby rode the wave of publicity right onto the White
House lawn, where hundreds of reporters turned out to watch the broccoli-
boosting first lady accept three boxes of the vegetable and a bouquet.
That was just the tip of a 10,000-pound avalanche of broccoli Califor-
nia growers shipped east to donate to soup kitchens and shelters in the na-

tion's capital in a riposte to the president's predilections.
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates: for fall and winter (2 semesters)
$28.00 in-town and $39 out-of-town, for fall only $18.00 in-town and $22.00 out-of-town.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and the Student News Service.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336, Cir-
culation 764-0558, Classified advertising 764-0557, Display advertising 764-0554, Billing 764-0550

I

COUNCIL
Continued from page 1
After 3,000 students were registered
to vote this spring, Marsh said he
expects a minimum of 600 students
to vote in the Fourth Ward race.
"People are looking for new solu-
tions to the city's problems," said
Marsh, who is also stressing leader-
ship in his campaign.
"(Ann Arborites) don't wasn't a
laissez-faire manager." he contends.
"My election will provide a return to
leadership to advocate their con-
cerns."
Councilmember Mark Ouimet
(R-Fourth Ward), Marsh's opponent,
thinks his managerial ability is an
asset.
A senior Vice-President with
GreathLakes Bankcorps, Ouimet
brought his 18 years of banking ex-
perience to the council two years
ago.

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In 1988, Ouimet's campaign vic-
tory was one of three for Republi-
cans that gave the G.O.P. a working
majority on the council.
Ouimet said he feels his manage-
ria. ability has been one of his major
contributions to the council. "There
was a need to bring an expert to the
council that understood the
(financial) issues," he said.
Trying to stay out of ideological
wrangles and rise above council poli-
tics, Ouimet said he focuses on solv-
ing problems. A member of the
city's budget and capital improve-
ment committees, Ouimet points to
his work which helped erase the
city's budget deficit as one of his
best achievements.
Ouimet said city government in
Ann Arbor tends to ignore problems
until they get too big.
Referring to the current solid.
waste crisis - which the city is ask-
ing voters for $28 million to solve,
Ouimet said, "We need to look for-
ward. What's the landfill problem of
the year 2000?"
Ouimet said one of those poten-
tial crises is maintenance of the
city's infrastructure - roads, bridges
- at a certain level without raising
taxes is one of those problems.
While Marsh has said that city
hall has not done enough to control
development of Ann Arbor's remain-
ing green spaces, Ouimet believes
the main issue concerning develop-
mant lire in rnnrina tinit it wth ad-

I'

EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor in Chief
Managing Editor
News Editors
Opinion Page Editor
Asociate Editors
Weekend Editors

Noah Frnkel
Kristine LaLonde
Karen Akeot, Marion Davis,
Tara Gruzen, Vera Songwe
David Schwartz
. Matthew Miler, Laura Sankey
iguoe Cruz,
Kevin Woodson
Jose Juarez, David Lubbker
Todd Dale

Sports Editor
Associate Sports Editors
Arts Editors
Books
Rim
Muac
Theater

Nike Gil
Steve Coe, Andy Gottesman,
David Hyman, Eric Lemont
Taylor Lncon
Alyssa Katz, Krisin Palm
CardynPajor
Jen BAK Brent Edwards
Forrest Green lI
Jay Peka

9

Photo Editors
List Editor

'1.

b r

"

I

News: Josephine Ballenger, Joanna Broder, Diane Cook, Heather Fee, Jennifer Hir, Ian Hoftman, Mark Katz, Christine laoostra, Ruth
Utimam, Emily Miler, Josh Mitnick, Dan Poux, Amy Ouick, GI Renberg, Mike Sobel, Michael Sullivan Noelle Vance, Elisabeth
W"eist"n, Donna Woodwel.
Opinion: Mark Buchan, Yael Citro, Ian Gray, Leslie Heilbrun, Stephen Henderson, Aarg Robinson, Tony Siber, David Sood.
Sports: Adam Benson, Eric Berkman, Michael Bess, Andy Brown, Theodore Cox, Doug Donaldson, Joni Durst, Richard Eisen, Jared
Entin, Scott Erskine, Phil Green, Tom Kent, Abert Lin, John Niyo, Sarah Osburn, Matt Rennie, Jonathan Samnick, David Schecter,
Ryan Schreber, Jeff Shoran, Dan Zoch.
Arts: Greg Baise, Sherrill L Bennett, Mark Binelli, Kenneth Chow, Lymve Cohn~, Beth Coiott. Sharon Grhnberg, Brian Jarvinen, Scot
Kirkwood, Mike Kuniavsky, Ami Mehta, Mike Molitor, Annette Petrusso, Jay Pinka, Antonio Roque, Ilyse Schanz, Wendy Shanker,
Peter Shapiro, Rona Sheramy, Mark Swartz, Justine Unain, Philip Washington, Mark Webster, Kim Yaged, Nabeel Zubed.
Photo: Jennifer Dunetz, Amy Feldman, Julie Hdiman, Jonathan Liss, Josh Moore, Samantha Sanders, Kenneth Smadler, Steven
Szuch.
Weekend: Phil Cohen, Rob Earle, Donna ladipado, Alex Gordon, Nana Trachtman, Fred Zin.

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