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March 21, 1990 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1990-03-21

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Page, 2-The Michigan Daily -Wednesday, March 21, 1990

ROBERTS
Continued from page 1
you have in that election -- a large
cross-over of women, and of men
too, .who are choice voters," she
said,
"ut because abortion is not a
PAS- S
,PASS

big issue at the federal level, it is
not, in my view, going to be a huge
issue in these Congressional cam-
paigns, where you will see it come
up," Roberts added.
Roberts said the abortion issue
has created divisions within the par-
ties, especially the Republican party.
"The reason it's a bigger problem
for Republicans is because there's a
much bigger expectation of them on
the part of the ant-abortion commu-
nity," she said.
Roberts also discussed journalis-
tic issues. She said the monopoliza-
tion of newspapers has narrowed the
market, and forced all papers to
strive for objectivity.

MANDATE
Continued from page 1
"The discussion seems to focus
on who the people in our neighbor-
hood are," said Achenbaum. He said
the University seemed to be collect-
ing people from different cultures as
if they were "stripes" without also
emphasizing the need for a broad
range of ideas.
"It seems we should really be in-
terested in promoting a diversity of
ideas which needs but doesn't depend
on a diversity of people," Achen-
baum said.
In response to Achenbaum's crit-
icism University Vice Provost and
by Judd Winick

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Vice President for Academic Affairs
Charles Vest said, "Intellectual di-
versity must be promoted and valued
greatly within our University."
"However, the Mandate addresses
a different moral and historical im-
perative. In the long run, the two are
coupled," he said.
The goal of the Mandate, says
Duderstadt in his foreword of the
dlocument, is to "join inextricably
together... community and pluralism
and excellence and diversity."
Michigan Student Assembly
President Aaron Williams, an engi-
neering senior, said that goal could
be reached if the University stops
thinking of students as statistics.
"These are just numbers. People
don't want to be known as a num-
ber. The University has to make it
know they want (a certain person)
because that person is important."
CHINA'
Continued from page 1
to China's struggling economy,
which flourished and then overheated
under Deng's economic reforms of
the past decade. Li imposed tough
austerity measures in 1988 to com-
bat excessive growth and runaway
inflation.
Senior leader Deng Xiaoping was
missing from the rostrum, his seat
conspicuously empty beside party
chief Jiang Zem in.
NAMIBIA
Continued from page 1
watched the celebrations.
South African President F.W. de
Klerk marked the end of his nation's
rule of Namibia by calling for peace
in the region. "I stand here tonight
as an advocate. for peace. The season
for violence has passed for Namibia
and the whole of southern Africa,"
he said.
"It is above all a moment for
hope. Hope that the future of this
vast and beautiful land will bring
peace,' de Klerk added.
Soldiers of the new Namibian
army in blue uniforms and green
berets marched briskly through the
stadium to the beat of drums as
officers bearing swords barked com-
mands. About 25,000 spectators,
some of whom waited 12 hours for
the ceremony, roared approval at
their first sight of the new army.
A runner bearing a torch that had
been carried about 1,800 miles
around the country ran into the sta-
dium and lighted a "Flame of Free-
dom."

AND awetea k ~ol/ o' ye'. 1 Dc .
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Calvin and Hobbes

Israeli TV reports Shamir is
likely to head the new gov't
JERUSALEM - Israel TV said Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir holds
the best chance of being tapped to form a new government after the ultra-
Orthodox parties split Monday over backing his right-wing Likud bloc or
the Labor Party.
The religious parties hold the key votes on who will lead the govern-

by Bill Watterson

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and staff reports

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ment.
The spiritual leader of the ultra-Orthodox Shas, or Torah guardians,
said Torah Flag parties held a crucial meeting and decided to back Shamir,
Israel radio said.
Earlier Monday, leading rabbinical scholars of the small ultra-Orthodox
party Agudat Israel decided to throw their support behind Shimon Peres'
Labor Party.
Shas leader, Interior Minister Aryeh Deri, indicated Monday on army
radio that Shas' support of the Likud was conditional on acceptance of
proposals from U.S. Secretary of State James Baker for convening Israeli-
Palestinian peace talks.
Senate rejects provision to
toughen pollution control
WASHINGTON - The Senate rejected efforts last night to toughen
auto pollution controls in a compromise clean air bill as opponents
successfully argued the provision was "a prescription for deadlock."
The vote was 52-46 to table, and in effect kill, an amendment which
would have required considerably tighter emissions controls on
automobiles than a compromise bill crafted by Senate leaders and the
White House. It also called for one million vehicles capable of burning
fuels other than gasoline toward the end of the decade.
Sen. Timothy Wirth, D-Colo., and other backers of the amendment
argued that additional restrictions on automobile pollutants were needed
because autos "are the biggest source of pollution in our cities."
But Senate leaders and supporters of the compromise bill characterized
the tougher requirement as threatening enactment of clean air legislation
altogether this year because of the strong opposition from the Bush
administration.
Bill lowers seniors' medicare
LANSING - About 250 senior citizens crammed into a committee
room yesterday as legislators voted to eliminate some out-of-pocket
expenses for seniors whose doctors charge above the Medicare
reimbursement rate.
The House Judiciary Committee approved the bill, but Republicans
said it interfered with the free market system. "We need government
regulation of prices only when competition doesn't exist," said Rep. Tom
Power, R-Traverse City.
The bill, sponsored by Rep. Perry Bullard, D-Ann Arbor, does not
change the current requirement that senior citizens pay 20 percent of the
charge.
"There are many horror stories of senior citizens being victimized by
unscrupulous doctors, clinics and hospitals," said Charles Smith, a senior
citizen from Detroit.
Doctors oppose the bill, and said fewer of them will take Medicare
patients because they currently are not fully reimbursed anyway.
Lawyers dispute Exxon
Valdez captain's sobriety
ANCHORAGE, Alaska - A prosecutor denounced yesterday Joseph
Hazelwood as a man who drank recklessly before his ship created the
nation's worst oil spill, and accused Exxon of pressuring crew members
to testify for the captain.
But a defense attorney replied in closing arguments that crew
members were not the only ones who saw that Hazelwood wasn't
impaired aboard the Exxon Valdez when it struck a charted reef a year ago
Saturday.
Defense attorney Dick Madsen pointed to 21 witnesses at
Hazelwood's criminal trial who said the captain was sober and showed
no signs of being impaired by alcohol.
Assistant District Attorney Brent Cole said it was not necessary to
show that Hazelwood looked intoxicated to have been impaired by drink.
"The state has to prove he was under the influence of intoxicating
liquor," Cole said. He said this did not mean that "a person is stumbling,
falling down, and needs support."
EXTRAS
Daily romps the Review
Those on the right side of the campus political fence - especially The
Michigan Review - have been bragging that student conservatives are
taking over campus.
But not so on the volleyball court. Last Saturday, the Daily Libels
volleyball team defeated a team from the Review 14-16, 15-13, and 15-10.
Any other campus political organizations or publications care to
challenge us?
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and winter
terms by students at the University of Michigan. Subscription rates: for fall and winter (2 semesters)
$28.00 in-town and $39 out-of-town, for fall only $18.00 in-town and $22.00 out-of-town.

The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and the Student News Service.
ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.
PHONE NUMBERS: News (313) 764-0552, Opinion 747-2814, Arts 763-0379, Sports 747-3336, Cir-
culation 764-0558, Classified advertising 764-0557, Display advertising 764-0554, Billing 764-0550

0

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Do You Feel Like The

--:-:
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Only Person On Campus

Who Can't Use A
Computer?

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r
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Come To The Undergraduate Library's Academic
Resource Center OPEN HOUSE on March 20th

GARDEN
Retarn
SZECHUAN, HUNAN & PEKING CUISINE
Good nutrition is our concern.
COCKTAILS * CARRY-OUT & DELIVERY
Sundae Buffet
Mon.- Thurs. 11:30-10:00;
Fri. 11:30-11:00; Sat. neon-1 1:00;
Sun. noon- 10:00
3035 Washtenaw,, Ann Arbor
971- 09740

.A.
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between 3-6 p.m. At the Open house we will:
-Show you our facilities to teach
you Microsoft Word on a Zenith or
MacIntosh computer!
Hand out Free Disks!
Give away assorted freebies
essential to every undergraduate!
Join us at the A.R.C., room 219 in the

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Undergraduate Library.

For more information, call Karen Downing at 764-4479
or the Pic-line at 764-6849 and leave a message.

EDITORIAL STAFF:
Editor in Chief
Managing Editor
News Editors
Opinion Page Editor
Asociate Editors
Weekend Editors

Noah Finkel
Kristine LaLonde
Karen Akedof, Marion Davis,
Tara Gruzen, Vera Songwe
David Schwartz
I. Matthew Miller, Laura Sankey
Miguel Cruz,
Kevin Woodson

Sports Editor
Associate Sports Editors

Arts Editors
Books
Rim
Music

Mike Gill
Steve Cohen, Andy Gottesman,
David Hyman, Eric Lemont,
Taylor Linoln
Alyssa Katz, Kristn Palm
Carolyn Por
Jen Biik, Brent Edwards
Forrest Green III

..:'
.-.--:.

Photo Editors Jose Juarez, David Lubliner rTearrJay Pekala
List Editor Todd Dale
News: Josephine Ballenger, Joanna Broder, Diane Cook, Heather Fee, Jennifer Hrl, Ian Hoffman, Mark Katz, Christine Kloostra, Ruth
Lttmann, Emi Miller, Josh Mitnick, Dan Poux, Amy Quidk, GI Renberg, Mike Sobel, Michael Sullivan Noele Vance, Elisabeth
Weinstein, Donna Woodwell.
Opinion: Mark Buchan, Yael Citro, Ian Gray, Leslie Heilbrunn, Stephen Henderson, 1. Matthew Miler, Aaron Robinson, Tony Silber,
David Sood.
Sports: Eric Berkman, Michael Bess, Theodore Cox, Doug Donaldson, Jeni Durst, Richard Eisen, Jared Entin, Scott Erskine, Steve
Fraiberg, Phi Green, Lory Knapp, Albert Lin, John Niyo, Jill Ory, Sarah Osburn, Matt Rennie, Jonathan Samnick, Ryan Schreiber, Jeff
Sheran, Peter Zellen, Dan Zoch.
Arts: Greg Baise, Sherrill L Bennett, Mark Binelli, Kenneth Chow, Lynne Cohn, Beth Coquitt, Sharon Grimberg, Brian Jarvinen, Scott
Kirkwood, Mike Kuniavsky, Ami Mehta, Mike Moitor, Annette Petrusso, Jay Pinka, Anonio Roque, Nyse Schanz, Wendy Shanker,
Peter Shapiro, Rona Sheramy, Mark Swartz, Justine Unain, Philip Washington, Mark Webster, Im Yaged, Nabeel Zubed.
Photo: Jennifer Dunetz, Any Feldman, Julie Hoillman, Jonathan Liss, Josh Moore, Samantha Sanders, Kenneth Smoler, Steven
Szuch.

'qq

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BUSINESS STAFF

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