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March 28, 1989 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-03-28

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4

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, 'March 28, 1989

Associated Press
Guatemalan Mutiny
A member of the "Pavon" penal farm police notes the name of one of the wounded in yesterday's mutiny
as he was evacuated to on of the city hosptials.-.

Martin
Continued from Page 1
tics is based on a belief in
"voluntarism" and "grass-roots
community involvement," rather
. than having city bureaucrats provide
the answers to all the city's prob-
lems.
This philosophy influences most
of her stands on city issues.
On the landfill issue, Martin de-
parts from the widely-held view that
mandatory recycling is needed to
lessen the burden on the city's land-
fill.
Martin said there are too many
problems to begin a mandatory
recycling program right now, such
as cooperation by students in multi-
unit housing, hardships on the el-
derly and the handicapped, and prob-
lems of enforcement.
"Will we have to have a garbage
snooper?" she asked.
Martin said she prefers voluntary
recycling instead. "There will be
considerable cooperation (with vol-
untary efforts)," she said.
She also wants more research on
new methods of trash incineration,
which she says will not cause
pollution given new technology.
. Martin's philosophy also dictates
a stand against the proposed override
of the Headlee amendment as a cure
to the city deficit.
"We've already got an increase in
property tax assessments," she said.
Instead Martin proposes the col-
lection of delinquent property taxes,
the combination of the police and
fire department dispatch units, and a
possible one percent cut in each city
department, as some ways to close
the city's $2.8 cumulative budget
deficit.
On crime, Martin says the city
must be tougher, particularly in the
crime-ridden corner of Liberty and
Maynard.
"We have to keep it clean by get-
ting the number of police you need
down there," she said.
Martin extends her emphasis on
voluntarism to what some have
called a lack of low-income housing
in Ann Arbor.
"The housing business is not a
government function," she said.
"One problem I do have is accom-
modating anyone who walks into
town and says 'I want to live in Ann
Arbor and the city should provide me
affordable housing.' That's not a
reasonable expectation."

k "
Levine
Continued from Page 1
And Jesse Levine likes nothing
better than to talk about his remedies
for local problems. Every night
Levine talks to residents and students
to garner Second Ward votes. His
campaign workers, many whotn are
students, talk to fraternities and
sororities.
Levine said his first priority is to
solve the city's overflowing-landfill
crisis.
"Its crying for a solution," Levine
said. "George Bush says he wants to
be the 'education president.' I want to

be the 'solid waste disposal coun-
cilmember."'
Le-vine supports increased inter-
governmental cooperation between
the city, the state, and the county,
and mandatory recycling to lessen the
burden on the landfill.
As an economics concentrator,
Levine is particularly interested in
the city's budget crunch. He opposes
the rollback of the Headlee amend-
ment that would increase property
taxes to close the deficit. Instead he
favors an approach that would close
the deficit through the collection of
delinquent city property taxes, the
sale of some city-owned real estate,
anid an increase in fees for city ser-

vices.
Levine has also been a foe of the
State Department of Corrections' ef-
forts to place a halfway house for
over 150 soon-to-be paroled prisoners
at the Varsity House Motel on
Washtenaw Ave., across the street
from his Second Ward.
He said the state should expand
the county jail and run a work-release
program out of that instead of plac-
ing prisoners near residential and
commercial areas and near a day-care
center.
Levine said he and Democratic
mayoral candidate Ray.Clevenger are
taking the lead in working to resolve
the state/city dispute over the
halfway house. Both candidates met
with the Senate Criminal Justice{
Committee in Lansing last month.
Levine, former chair of the Col-
lege Democrats, is also concerned
with student issues. He said he sees
lack of student parking as a problem
and wants to look into building an;
underground parking structure in the'
South. University area, paid for by
the Downtown Development1
Authority.,

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S.INESS

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and staff reports
Bush quiets unruly aide
WASHINGTON - The White House, trying to put an end to an
embarrassing episode, today brushed aside a complaint from President
Bush's legal counsel about the new Contra aid agreement and issued what
amounted to a public rebuke of the official.
In a highly unusual move, White House Counsel C. Boyden Gray was
quoted Sunday as saying the agreement encroached on the president's
power to conduct foreign policy. Privately, White House officials were
perplexed that Gray would go public with a challenge to a policy Bush
had embraced.
White House press secretary Marlin Fitzwater said Gray met with chief
of staff John Sununu today. "They had a polite discussion about how
things work in the White House," Fitzwater said.
Asked why Gray would have felt that the agreement had not received
proper legal review, Fitzwater replied, "I just can't tell you what was in
Boyden Gray's mind. That's more than I can handle."
No progress made on hostage release
WASHINGTON - Terry Anderson is two weeks into his fifth.year as
a hostage in Beirut. and business is proceeding about as usual, which
means that nothing is evident.
For the hostages business as usual means only waiting.
Now that the four-year anniversary observances are over, the hostage
issue is back on the burner, an agonizing, frustrating riddle in which nine
Americans are held captive and silent by terrorists who themselves are
silent most of the time.
After a Capitol hill ceremony on the Anderson anniversary date, March
16, there were going to be yellow ribbons on display around congress,
and a resolution seeking action to end the hostage ordeal.
Neither ribbons nor resolutions are in evidence. President Bush
suggested as he took office that moves by Iran to assist the hostages, to
establish contact and help gain their release would be a significant step
toward a time of better relations with the United States.
There was no response. He said no more on the subject.
Justice Department director to
become U.S. attorney in Detroit
WASHINGTON-The man in charge of the Justice Department 's le-
gal policy office is leaving to become acting U.S. attorney in Detroit, the
department said yesterday.
Detroit native Stephen Markman, an assistant attorney general, will
become acting U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Michigan. He will
succeed Roy Hayes, who will depart, effective April 7.
Attorney General Dick Thornburgh took away the office's responsibil-
ity for judicial screening after he took office in August. His immediate
staff and assistants now perform that duty.
The White House has also added that it will take a more active role in
initial, screening of would-be judges.
Markman has held his current post since 1985, prior to that, he was
chief counsel to the Senate subcommittee on.the Constitution.
Court debates youths' death sentence
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court was urged Monday to find a
national consensus "against executing our young" and ban the death
penalty for all juvenile murderers. But questions from the bench during
the two hours of arguments in cases from Missouri and Kentucky
suggested the justices doubt that any clear consensus exists.
The high court is to decide by July whether imposing the death penalty
on murderers who committed their crimes before reaching the age of 18
represents "cruel and unusual punishment" banned by the Constitution's
Eighth Amendment.
The Court's decision will affect only 31 if the more than 2,220 death
row inmates nationwide. The justices were told that of the 36 states with
capital punishment laws, only 12 ban the death penalty for killers who
were under 18 when they committed their crimes.
EXTRAS
Easter egg roll draws kids to
Bush's White House backyard
WASHINGTON - Hundreds of spiffily dressed youngsters and their
parents thronged the South Lawn of the White House yesterday to take
part in the traditional Easter Egg Roll and, maybe, catch a glimpse of
President Bush and his wife, Barbara.
The Bushes, accompanied by children and grandchildren, put in a brief
appearance midway, in the event, with the president blowing a whistle to
start the kids off trying to roll eggs along the lawn with plastic spoons.

The president asked one little girl, who said her name was Rachel, "Do
you know who lives here?"
"The Easter Bunny," the girl said.
The president conceded that was a good answer, since he was in fact
accompanied by two people in bunny costumes.
"Who else?" he asked.
"I don't know," she replied.
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