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March 28, 1989 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1989-03-28

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, March 28, 1989 - Page 3

I

u

Activists remember
Three Mile Island
nuclear tragedy

HARRISBURG (AP) - Anti-
nuclear activities marked the 10th
anniversary of the Three Mile Island
nuclear plant accident with renewed
warnings yesterday that the health
effects are hidden and the lessons
forgotten.
Scientists and nearby residents
held news conferences at the state
Capitol and a vigil was planned out-
side the plant late Monday and for 4
a.m. Tuesday, the time the accident
began.
"The so-called accident at TMI
was an act of violence against
mankind, an act of violence against
the unborn," said Jane Lee, from
nearby Etters, referring to the March
28, 1979 incident.
The nation's worst nuclear acci-
dent occurred when a series of human
and mechanical errors allowed the
plant's 150-ton radioactive core to
lose cooling water. Half the core
melted and 20 tons of molten mate-
rial raced to the bottom of the reactor
before it was held in check by a re-
maining pool of water. Radioactive
gas was released to the atmosphere.
"This marks a decade of false de-
nials and outright lies on the part of
the utility that owns and operates
Three Mile Island...and on the part
of the state of Pennsylvania, which
has systemically obfuscated and hid-
den any real statistics about the
deaths that have occurred in the wake

of the accident at TMI," said Harvey
Wasserman, who wrote the book,
"Killing Our Own," about the health
effects of nuclear power.
He said 75 percent of the nation's
commercial reactors haven't com-
pleted modifications required in the
wake of the accident.
A spokes person for the federal
Nuclear Regulatory Commission
said he could not immediately re-
spond to Wasserman's charge.
Ernest Sternglasss, a University
of Pittsburgh radiation physics pro-
fessor, reiterated claims that the fed-
eral and state governments are
covering up the true health effects of
the accident.
He said information has been
suppressed that would show radiation
from Three Mile Island increased in-
fant mortality in Pennsylvania, New
York and Maryland and cause thou-
sands of other excessive deaths by
lowering people's immunity.
Several people who live near the
plant gathered at the Capitol to recall
the accident and the marks it has left
on their lives.
Deborah Baker of Middletown,
who won a $1 million settlement
from the plant owners' insurance
company, said her own research has
convinced her the accident caused her
son to be born nine months later
with Down's Syndrome.

'U, Co
diScuSS
speech
BY JOSH MITNICK
With their May 1 deadline only a
few weeks away, members of the
University Council - the group
which proposes University conduct
- is now formulating recommenda-
tions to implement free speech
guidelines on campus.
'U'Council
Council members used
hypothetical scenarios regarding the
Law School commencement contro-
versy in yesterday's meeting while
discussing details for pre-protest
mediation and decisions which could
be made to intervene in protests.
Last January Dean Bollinger
banned FBI recruitment at the Law
School because the organization dis-
criminated against minorities. But
Bollinger's invitation to William
Sessions, director of the FBI, to
speak at this year's law school
commencement has sparked objec-
tions.
"I think it will be interesting to
see how the guidelines relate to the
potential problems with the Law
School graduation," said Physics
prof. Jens Zorn, the council co-chair.
Group members agreed that me-
diators who are recruited to preside
over pre-protest dialogue should be
"unbiased," have credibility with
both parties, and be familiar with the
Civil Liberties Board guidelines. The
dialogue would prompt parties to
agree on protest guidelines.
Rackham graduate student Corey
Dolgan pointed out that refusal to
enter in mediation is not a violation
of the guidelines. "Refusal to medi-
ate should not implicate anyone," he
said.
The council also read over the
Civil Liberties Board guidelines on
free speech, noting that clarifications

aif

code
would have to be made. The Univer-
sity's Board of Regents adopted the
CLB guidelines last July as a policy
on free speech.
The University Council - which
disbanded in 1987 due to heated dis-
agreements between faculty and stu-
dents - has until May 1 to demon-
strate to the regents their ability to
function effectively, or they will be
permanently disbanded.
Before the council's guidelines
can go to the regents it needs the
approval of Senate Advisory Com-
mittee on University Affairs and the
Michigan Student Assembly.
SACUA chair Beth Reed asked the
councilmembers if they had consid-
ered the possibility that the ratifica-
tion of these proposals could take
longer than the time period that the
council has to work with.
"It is possible they're going to
have to go back and forth a couple of
times between the council and the
ratifying groups," she said.
Reed added that the new MSA
administration may not be as famil-
iar with the council's procedures.
"The previous administration under-
stood these procedures because they
helped develop them," Reed said.
Next week the council will begin
working with a special computer to
begin drafting specific language for
the proposal which will then be re-
viewed by the regents.
AUD
PASS
IT
AROUND!

icil

free

JOSE JUAREZ/Daily

A 'peace' of cake
Mike Spiro, a first year LS&A student, cuts up free pieces of cake. The
cake was for the anniversary of the Camp David Peace treaty between
Israel and Egypt.

Zeus reaches Olympus: Greek week
raises money for three philanthrophies

BY JODY WEINBERG
AND JENNIFER MILLER
After a week of zany competi-
tions and talent shows to raise
money for charity, the team of

Lambda Chi Alpha, Delta Delta
Delta, and Phi Sigma Kappa are the
new winners of Greek Week.
But they were not the only
winners - several charities will

Greek W

Event
Volleyball contest
Pie eating contest
White Castle eat-off
Banner competition
Greek olympics (overall)
Anchor splash
Spaghetti relay
Mr. Greek Week
Jello jump
Bed race
Musical chairs
Twistermania
Limbo contest
Dance contest
Phi Psi 500
Greek sing
Greek variety

leek 1989 results
Winning team
EK, ZAM
AE4, ZBT
XZ, B8I, Acacia
AE, 1TN, X'P
A, ZN, AYO
AAA, AXA, (ZK
AFA, ATA, (TA8
A4', ZN, AZ4
XQ, X4, Triangle
A4, IN, AFB
AE, ZBT
AAA, AXA, fiK
(tie) KK, 4K P, (KT
IF4B, X, OAX
XQ, X, Triangle
AFA, ATA, AO
AOI1, 4WA, AY
AAA, AXA, (IK
Top 10 teams

benefit from the proceeds raised from
Greek Week. The money that was
raised from selling sweatshirts, en-
trance fees, and tickets to the variety
show is estimated over $20,000, said
Mark Weiss, chair of Greek Week.
This year's official philanthropies
were Literacy Volunteers of Amer-
ica, The Wilmot House and Prospect
Place.
In addition to the three designated
philanthropies, money will also go
the charity of the particular house
that sponsored the event.
Alpha Tau Omega fraternity
raised $3,250 by serving 1300 meals
at Spaghetti Chowdown this year.
The proceeds are going to the Ann
Arbor Art Association who considers
Alpha Tau Omega one of its biggest
contributors, said Marsha Chamber-
lin, a spokesperson from the Art
Start Program.
"Their gift from Greek Week is
right up there with some of the ma-
jor corporations," Chamberlin said.
The money generated from the Pi
Beta Phi Jello Jump will go to
Muscular Distrophy for research at
the University and other major uni-
versities around the world. Money
also will provide funds for orthope-

dic equipment and summer camps for
children with Muscular Distrophy,
said Bonnie Thurston, program
coordinator for the Muscular Distro-
phy Association.
Zeta Tau Alpha's Mr. Greek
Week raised over $1,000 for the
Washtenaw Association of Retarded
Citizens. And the Alpha Omicron Pi
Dance contest brought in about
$2,000 for the Arthritis Research
Foundation. These results have not
been officially calculated, but are
current estimates from respective
Greek Week house chairs.
Although most of the goals set
for Greek Week were met, the
American Red Cross Blood Drive
fell short of its aims: 500 pints of
blood were desired, but only 360
pints were donated.
Neal Fry, the Coordinator from
the Red Cross described the situation
as "unfortunate" due to a virus
which left the Red Cross short three
nurses. As a result, there was a two
hour wait to donate blood.
For many students donating
blood did not fit into with their class
schedules; over 100 students had no
choice but to leave before it was
their turn to donate.

i
t
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}
i
t
r
i
3

Spring concert
UAC/Amazin' Blue present
Saa rday,AiriUi1,oO989
M i ch iga U n ion Ba llr o om
8:00 p.m.

1
2
3
4
5

AAA, AXA, D4K
AFA, ATA, (D4AO
ACD, EN, AFD
AXQ, AEtI
AEA, ATO, TY

6
7
8-
9
10

AArI, KZ, AEA,
1701B, OX, nAX
ADE, TEN, X'P
XQ, XD, Triangle
KAO, AKE, Evans Scholars

THE

LIST

Let Them Know
How You Feel1I!
DAILY PERSONALS 764-0557

ra

Ticks:$2.00

What's happening in Ann Arbor today

Speakers
"The Social and Political
Thought of Eugenio Maria
de Hostos Still in Force Af-
ter One-Hundred-Fifty Years
of his Birth" - Prof. Alfonso
Latoni, University of Puerto Rico,
Henderson Rm., Michigan League,
8 pm.
Solidarity Discussion Se-
ries: "Education and Dia-
logue: The Politics of
Teaching" - Buzz Alexander,
Guild House, 7 pm.
"Pakistan: The Land and Its
People" - In celebration of
Pakistan Day, Chrysler Center
Aud., North Campus, 5:30 pm.
Various foods, dress, handicrafts,
etc.
Meetings
Iranian Student Cultural
Cloth - M 4..,,- .. Iarnr L'201 . .., (C

Call 763-TKTS for more info

Union, 8 pm.
Ann Arbor Committee to
Defend Abortion Rights -
Kuenzel Rm., Michigan Union,
time unannounced.
U of M Baha'i Club - Ander-
son Rm., Michigan Union, 7:30
pm. Guest Speaker: Steve Gonza-
les on "Sexism in the Media" .
Furthermore
SUNRAYCER Solar Powered
Vehicle - Winner of 1987
World Solar Challenge race across
Australia. On display in EECS
building atrium all day.
Demonstration by drivers and en-
gineers in 1013 Dow at 5:00 pm.
U of M Faculty Women
Painters - North Campus Com-
mons Gallery, open to public, free
of charge. From March 28- April
4.
Peer Writing Tutors - 611

Resume
Service
For high quality resumes,
matching cover sheets and
envelopes, depend on Kinko's,
the copy center.

SPEND YOUR SUMMER VACATION IN ISRAEL
for as little as
$650!
The Jewish Learning Exchange of Ohr Somayach
and Neve Yerushalayim is sponsoring a unique
program of comprehensive Jewish studies and tours
for as little as $650 (tuition, room, board and round-
trip airfare from N.Y.).
June 14- Auaust 18, 1989

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