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January 06, 1988 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1988-01-06

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4

Page2 -The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, January 6, 1988
Smells, stars fill

CRISP room

(Continued from Page 1)
exceptions. One year, a particularly
creative and outraged student managed
-to transcend the usual screaming and
door slamming and put his fist
through a box of time schedules
instead, Giggey recalled;
-the wait-listers. "Some (students)
have you wait-list the whole book
almost," said operator Harriet Brown.
An unofficial and informal poll of
CRISP employees sets the record at
14 to 15 wait-listed classes for one
student. LSA senior Colin McCarthy
said he has come close to the record.
McCarthy said one semester he wait-
listed 10 or 12 classes which he had
his girlfriend, his roommate, and his
brother help him sit in on for the
first few days of the semester.
"It seems everyone at the
University wants the classes I want
to get into," McCarthy said. "I
always seem to go last, no matter
what. I'm used to it. It doesn't bother
me," he said;

-Jamie Morris. The man seems
capable of single-handedly making a
CRISP operator's day. Michigan's
star tailback, besides being
Michigan's career rushing leader, is
also a registration favorite. CRISP
workers describe Morris as "a lovely
person," "so pleasant," and "the
nicest." On request, Morris has
given autographs and autographed
pictures of himself to CRISP
employees, they said.
"I was so excited I could hardly
get anything done" when Morris
came to my terminal, remembered
one operator;
-the emotional CRISPers.
Emotional outbursts are not unusual
at CRISP, said Neil Hunter, who
works the printer. "It's an emotional
and traumatic experience for some of
them," Hunter said. Many operators
recall frustrated students getting very
upset during the process;
-the "don't you remember me's?"
Some students just can't get it

through their heads that this is an
anonymous, impersonal school.
"These kids will say, 'Hi don't you
remember me' and it's difficult to tell
them (no)," said Hunter, who rips
print-outs for thousands of students
each year.
Hunter does remember a few
names, however. He says students
named Michael Jackson, Elizabeth
Taylor, and Tammy Baker have all
picked up schedules at his printer
port.
Many CRISP employees say their
job is satisfying. Terminal operators
are "doing something for (students)

that (the students) want very much,"
said one employee.
The job does have it's non-
obvious pitfalls, however. "If you
were allergic to leather, you'd have
trouble," warned a worker who
identified herself as "Esther."
"A thousand leather jackets come
through here," she said, noting that
the smell of all that leather
sometimes bothers her allergies.
Smell, it seems, plays a key role
in identifying some students. Esther
noted that morning CRISPers
generally smell better than afternoon
CRISPers.

Disney-like monorail
may transport locals

(Continued from Page 1)
by an AATA board member. But the
idea, which called for 15 miles of
monorail tracks, never progressed
passed the initial stages.

It may be another decade before an
actual proposal is made.
The monorail's funding and size
have not been discussed.

HEALTH FITNESS
FOR -
BEGININERS
LEARN AIKIDO: THE WAY OF HARMONY.
An introductory course taught by Sensei Takashi Kushida, 8th
degree black belt from Japan. Two classes start in January:
- Thursdays 6:30-7:30 pm (Jan. 7, 14, 21, 28, Feb. 4)
- Saturdays 10:30-11:30 am (Jan. 9, 16, 23, 30, Feb. 6)
Cost: $20 for five sessions. Classes held in the Genyokan Dojo
in Ann Arbor, 749 Airport Blvd. (behind the State Rd. K-Mart).
For information, call 662-4686.
AIKIDO YOSHINKAI* ASSOCIATION OF NORTH AMERICA

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN HOSPITALS
VOLUNTEERS

Please call 764.6874
for additional info.

Venture into High Tech and add to
the Human Touch
Help Patients with the Healing
Process
Learn about the 150 rewarding
volunteer opportunities
INFORMATION SESSIONS
Thursday, Jan. 7, 7PM-8PM
Monday, Jan.11, 7PM-8PM
Rm. 2A201 Amphitheater
University Hospital
Thursday, Jan. 14, 4PM-5PM
Rm. 2C208, University Hospital
INIVERSY !_N EDICAL
MICHIGAN Lj CENTER

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press reports
City recovers from oil spill
PITTSBURGH - School closed for 20,000 pupils, and 15,000 sub-
urban residents were without water yesterday while crews scrambled to
jury-rig water supplies three days after a million-gallon oil spill on the
Monongahela River.
"This is a nightmare come true," said May's Manor nursing home
owner Joyce May as she moved 37 elderly patients out of a steam-heated
building where the Robinson Township Municipal Authority was forced
to cut off water.
"We've had to wash down some of the elderly patients with cold water,
and it's terrible," she said as the patients were led to a gas-heated building.
The Robinson Township authority, with only a 24-hour water reserve,
closed its Ohio River water intake Sunday, a day after a diesel fuel tank
collapsed.
Accused kidnapper appeals for
release of German hostage
DUESSELDORF, West Germany - Abbas Ali Hamadi appealed yes-
terday for the release of a West German held in Beirut, and denied any part
in seizing the hostage he allegedly intended an ransom for his imprisoned
brother.
It was the first day of his trial on kidnapping and other charges, which
is being held in a heavily fortified courtroom that was converted from a
police gymnasium in the 1970s for trials of the Baader-Meinhof terrorist
group.
Hamadi's brother is Mohammed Ali Hamadi, a 23-year-old Shiite
Moslem accused by the United States of leading the gang that hijacked a
TWA jetliner between Athens and Rome in June 1985.
Feds charge 25 with bribery
of EPA asbestos inspector
NEW YORK - Twenty-five demolition company executives were
charged yesterday with bribing a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
inspector to refrain from checking sites where asbestos was being re-
moved, authorities said.
In all, $170,000 in bribes were paid by officials of 23 companies that
are responsible for the majority of asbestos removal and disposal in New
York City, New Jersey, and New York's Long Island, said U.S. Attorney
Andrew Maloney.
The defendants were motivated by "hypocrisy, greed and exploitation,"
said Raymond Maria, a deputy inspector general for the federal Depart-
ment of Labor. The unidentified inspector also faces charges, said Mal-
oney.
Banks drive up dollar values
NEW YORK - Central banks swooped into foreign-exchange markets
again yesterday to purchase large amounts of dollars, yanking up the de-
pressed currency's value in a stunning gain that incited a broad-based rally
on Wall Street.
But experts questioned the stock market's New Year's stamina, coming
only a few months after its collapse. Some predicted the dollar and stocks
would weaken quickly if international coordination to defend the U.S.
currency eased.
The impact of the dollar's rise was felt acutely on Wall Street, where
the Dow Jones average of 30 industrial stocks gained 16.25 points to
2,031.50, a net gain for the first two trading days of 1988 of 92.67
points, or 4.7 percent. In early trading the Dow Index was up nearly 50,
but profit-takers eroded the gain.
EXTRAS
Leap second makes hours of
trouble for phone company
DETROIT - Michigan Bell Telephone Co. took about 31/2 days to
make up one second.
The company's computer-operated telephone time service wasn't
adjusted at 7 p.m. Thursday - midnight New Year's Eve, Greenwich
Mean Time - to account for this year's "leap second."
The adjustment is needed to synchronize the world's steadily running
atomic clocks with the ever-slowing rotation of the Earth.
But people who set watches or synchronized activities by Michigan
Bell's time signal were one second off during the weekend.
"We thought the change was automatically in the (computer's)
program. We manually added the second at 10 a.m. today," Michigan

Bell spokesperson Kara Kuchinic-Wittenberg said Monday.
The one-second discrepancy was noticed immediately by
Communications Electronics Inc. of Ann Arbor, which supplies satellite
delivered programming to broadcast stations.
If you see news happen, call 76-DAILY.
Vol. XCVIII - No.66
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the fall and winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April-$25 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the city. One term: $13 in
Ann Arbor; $20 outside the city.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and subscribes
to the Los Angeles Times Syndicate and the National Student News Ser-
vice.

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What s
- Ha n in g
Happeng
Recreational Sports
E IM BASKETBALL OFFICIALS CLINICS
Wednesday, January 6; Thursday, Jan. 7;
and Friday, January 8, 1988
7pm Intramural Sports Building
" IM BASKETBALL MANAGERS MEETING

a

Recreational
Sports

ENJOY SPORTS? TRY OFFICIATING!
" IM BASKETBALL OFFICIALS NEEDED -
WE TRAIN - WE PAY - $4.60/HOUR
YOU CAN SET YOUR WORK HOURS
TO MEET YOUR SCHEDULE!
FOR INFORMATION, CALL
MOBY BENEDICT 763-3562
An Equal Opportunity Employer

Wednesday, January 6
6pm Intramural Sports Building,

Main Gym

-11 \ & "N

UNION
Arts and Programming Presents

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Editor in Chief......................... ...................ROB EARLE
Managing Editor......................................AMY MINDELL
News Editor...............................................PHILIP 1. LEVY
City Editor.................................MELISSA BIRKS
Features Editor......... ......MARTIN FRANK
University Editor.................................KERY MURAKAMI
NEWS STAFF: Elizabeth Atkins, Francie Arenson,
Vicki Bauer, Eve Becker, Katherine Beitner, Steve
Blonder, Keith Brand, Jim Bray, Dov Cohen,
Hampton Dellinger, Kenneth Dinter, Sheala Durant,
Heather Eurich, Stephen Gregory, Grace Hill, Jeff
Hughes, Steve Knopper, Carrie Loranger. Michael
Lustig, Alyssa Lustigman, Tom MacKinnon, Andrew
Mills, Peter Orner, Lisa Pollak, Jim Poniewozik,
Melissa Ramsdell, David Schwartz, Martha
Sevetson, Lauren Sinai, Rachel Stock, Steve Tuch,
Ryan Tutak, David Webster, Rose Mary Wummel.
Opinion Page Editors.........................PETER MOONEY
HENRY PARK
Assoc. Opinion Page Editor..CALE SOUTHWORTH
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Muzammil Ahmed,
Rosemary Chinnock, Noah Finkel, Jim Herron, Eric
L. Holt, Gayle Kirschenbaum, Josh Levin, I. Matthew
Miller, Jeffrey Rutherford, Steve Semenuk, Tony

BETH FERTIG
Books...............................LISA MAGNINO
Film........................................JOHN SHEA
Theatre .................JENNIFER KOHN
ARTS STAFF: V.J. Beauchamp, Scott Collins, Robert
Flaggert, Timothy Huet, Brian Jarvinen, Avra
Kouffman. David Peltz, Mike Rubin, Mark Shaiman,
Todd Shanker, Lauren Shapiro, Chuck Skarsaune,
Mark Swartz, Marc S. Taras.
Photo ditors......................................SCOTT LITUCHY
ANDI SCHREIBER
PHOTO STAFF: Karen Handelman, Ellen Levy.
Robin Loznak, David Lubliner, Dana Mendelssohn,
John Munson, Grace Tsai.
Weekend Editors...............REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN
ALAN PAUL
CARTOONISTS: Aaron Chassy, Fred Zinn.
Sales Manager..............................ANNE KUBEK
Assistant Sales Manager..............KAREN BROWN
SALES STAFF: Gail Belenson. Sherri Blansky, Julie
Bowers, Valerie Breier, Pam Bullock, Stephanie
Burg, Milton Feld, Kim Feuerstein, Lisa George,
Michelle Gill, Missy Hambrick, Ginger Heyman, Matt
Lane, Jodi Manchik, Mindy Mendonsa, Eddy Meng.

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