100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 05, 1986 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-12-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

The Michigan Daily - Friday, December 5, 1986 - Page 3
No new members until
Fall 1988, Panhel says

Daily Photo by JAE KIMI

Waiting it out
Beth Odeh (left) waits for a friend while Jen Urick waits for a bus during yesterday afternoon's snowfall.
A ts a isolate proteilt
A IDS vX-aWccine --may result

WASHINGTON (AP) - Scientists have taken what
they think is an important step toward producing a
vaccine against AIDS, showing for the first time that
only a fragment of protein from the responsible virus
*s necessary for developing antibodies against it.
. A team of industry, government and university
researchers says the segment of viral protein spurs high
levels of antibodies that neutralize the virus in test
animals such as goats.
In addition, the researchers say they showed this
protein can be inexpensively mass-produced in large,
pure quantities using genetically engineered bacteria.
b However, they cautioned, it remains to be proven
'whether the protein segment can produce sufficient
neutralizing antibodies in humans to protect them
hgainst acquired immune deficiency syndrome.
Even if effective, a practical preventive vaccine still
is years away because of the extensive safety and
effectiveness tests that would be required before
approval, experts say.
Dr. Robert Gallo of the National Cancer Institute, a
co-discoverer of the AIDS virus and collaborator on the
-vaccine research, said he is enthusiastic about the latest
findings.
"We are excited by the results to date and have
Begun the process of testing the experimental vaccine
in chimpanzees,"Gallo said in a statement.
P THESE APES are the only known animals other
than humans that can get AIDS from the virus. Other
test animals, such as goats and rabbits, develop
antibodies to the virus but do not get the disease.
AIDS is an infectious disease that wrecks the
immune system and leaves victims open to numerous
'fatal infections. The condition, spread through close
contact with blood and other bodily fluids, has been
diagnosed in more than 28,000 Americans, half of
whom have died.
In a paper to be published in the Dec. 12 issue of

the journal Science, the researchers say the segment of
the gpl20 protein, which coats the AIDS virus, might
be a more attractive vaccine candidate than the whole
protein even though both induce neutralizing
antibodies.
At the time it is inducing antibodies, the whole
protein binds with the white blood cells that are targets
of the AIDS virus, but the segment does not, they said.
Cell binding may mask other defensive mechanisms
that might fight off the virus, they added.

By FAITH PENNICK
The housing shortage and fears
of a decline in the current
popularity of the Greek system
have spurred the Panhellenic Asso-
ciation to discourage new sororities
from starting on campus.
Last month, the executive board
of Panhel, which governs most
campus sororities, distributed a
"position paper" to its 19 chapters
stating that the association will not
add new chapters until the fall of
1988.
According to Panhel advisor
Mary Beth Seiler, the association
determined that there is currently no
need for new sororities on campus.
Since 1979, the Greek system has
grown rapidly, more than quad-
rupling its membership.
"The system needs time to
stabilize a little bit," Seiler said.
Panhel has added three new
sororities in the past two years.
Yet even member sororities are
having trouble finding housing.
Delta Phi Epsilon, for example, is
in search of a house because the
Ann Arbor Planning Commission
recently rejected a proposal that
would have allowed the sorority to
convert a single-family house into a
large group home.
NEW SORORITIES "don't
have any idea of what they're in for
as far as housing," Seiler said.
But members of up-and-coming
sororities, such as Pi Delta, are
upset by Panhel's decision. Since
its start in early October, the
organization has attracted 65
members and wants to eventually
become a national sorority. First,
Pi Delta must become an associate
member of Panhel for a year.
"It's obvious that if we have 65
members and had to stop accepting
people until the winter, there's a
need for another sorority", said Pi
Delta Vice President Beth Derman,
an LSA freshman. "We're just
F upset that they're giving us a hard
time."
According to Panhel, the
number of women rushing
sororities since 1979 has increased
61 percent and membership has
risen by 62 percent. The increase
seems to be slowing, however.
This fall's group of 1,147 rushees
was only 31 more people than last
fall.
IN SPITE of these figures, Pi
Delta believes their sorority is
needed. "A lot of girls were either
disappointed or turned down at
rush," said LSA sophomore
Jennifer Pam, Pi Delta president.
"So it was felt that there was a need
for another sorority on campus.
Right now, they [Panhel] want to
wait and see how the other
sororities are doing."

So far, Pi Delta has not
officially asked Panhellenic for
consideration as an associate
member. Said Pam, "When we feel
that we have enough to show to
Panhellenic, to convince them to
accept us, then we'll talk to them.
We want to show them that we're
active in fund-raising and academic
activities."
Seiler said, "We're not trying to
destroy them or anything, but
Panhellenic can't support them
until other things change. It all
depends on the, state of the Greek
system in the future."
To obtain associate membership,
an organization must have a
minimum of 25 members,
Calvin Klein
25%/_OFF
BIKINI UNDERWEAR
$5.501$7.50
sizes:5.6-7 8
TANK UNDERSHIRT
$6.50Is'o Ii
sizes: S-M-L
11 COLORS
I QTY. SIZE COLOR BIKINI/TANKI
1 - -
- ---- - - -
I Include .50 for shipping
I Nome:
Address: _
Zip:
LISend check or money order to:
neR DRhexs 7620s
- - - - -t- -

recognition by the Michigan
Student Assembly as a student
organization, no previous
commitments or connections to any
other Panhellenic organization ,and
a mandatory three-fourths vote of
approval from the Panhellenic
council. That vote overrides all
other requirements.
Panhel runs a campus-wide
computerized rush for its member
sororities every fall, and sororities
must be members to participate in
Greek Week, an annual Greek
fundraising effort.
tterui E6!S
CANTERBURY HOUSE
ESPISCOPAL CHURCH AT U-M
218 N. Division St.
Services daily, 5 p.m.; Midnight (exc.
Saturday).
All Are Welcome
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Ave. -663-5560
(Between Hill and South U.)
DR. PAUL FOELBER, Interim Pastor
Communion Service at 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
(between Hill and S. University St.)
William Hillegonds, Senior Minister
Sunday Worship Services at 9:30 and
11:00a.m.
Church School, including nurseries at
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Sunday Bible Study 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Communion Service
7:00 p.m.
' * * *
AMERICAN BAPTIST
CAMPUS CENTER
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Huron St. (between State & Division)
Sundays: 9:55 Worship, 11:25 Bible
Study groups for both Undergrads
and Graduate Students.
Wednesday: 5:30 Supper (free) and
Fellowship.
CENTER OPEN EACH DAY
for information call 663-9376
ROBERT B. WALLACE, PASTOR

Even if effective, a practical preventive
vaccine is still years away because of
extensive safety and effectiveness tests
that would be required before approval,
experts say.

Rea
ad
WLe
C'Daie

Foreign proteins can stimulate a host to produce
antibodies against them: These antibodies, also
proteins, stick to the foreign substance to inhibit it and
also serve to guide it to defensive cells that devour the
alien material.
The protein fragment work was conducted by Dr.
Scott Putney and colleagues of Repligen Corp., a
biotechnology company in Cambridge, Mass. Other
researchers involved in the project were at Centocor
Inc., a Malvern, Penn., genetic technology company,
Duke University Medical School and the cancer
institute.

f

Senate investigators
seek Iran crisis details

(Continued from Page 1)
questions and a lot of helpful,
x information."
The information, he said, is
"opening more doors that we have
to send a subpoena through in order
to (compile) accurate information."
The Minnesota Republican did
not say what documents the
committee was seeking. But in
Moultrie, Ga., Maule Aircraft
Corp. said it had received subpoenas
for records on four aircraft from the
U.S. attorney's office in Macon as
well from the Senate committee.
The four airplanes include one
reportedly sold to rebels in
Nicaragua by a firm headed by
retired Air Force Maj. Gen. Richard
Secord.
SECORD H AS been
identified by administration officials
as an assistant to fired National
Security Council aide Oliver North
in arranging the Iranian arms sales
and creation of a privately funded air
force to deliver weapons to the
Contra forces.
Billy Fallin, an attorney for the
firm, said the subpoenaed payment
instructions and records of
telephone calls between Maule and
the buyers have been turned over to
authorities as requested. "I'm not

Weinberger - but not the president
or Vice Preisdent George Bush.
At the White House, Frank
Carlucci, the president's newly
appointed national security adviser,
said he will have direct access to the
Oval Office and has free rein to
shake up the staff and operation of
the White House National Security
Council.
Retiring House Speaker Thomas
O'Neill (D-Mass.) predicted that
"everybody will be smoked out" in
the investigations that will come,
even if they use the Fifth
Amendment to avoid answering
questions. But O'Neill, who has
been a point-man for Democratic
opposition to Reagan for the past
six years, added that the issue does
not appear to be a Watergate-type
scandal that will force the president
to resign.
Speaking to reporters during a
photo session with Costa Rican
President Oscar Arias, Reagan said
he has not "given any thought" to
claiming executive privilege to
prevent Cabinet secretaries from
testifying.

BOOK SHOP SALE
Sat., Dec. 6-10-4
50% OFF ALL BOOKS
l -,
SSun., Dec. 7 - 1-4:30
and Mon., Dec. 8 - 10-8
BAG SALE-$3/bag
BOOK SHOP RE-OPENS JAN. 10
Ann Arbor Public Library-Fifth at William
Friends of the Ann Arbor Public Library

i

Open Mon. - Sat. 10 till 9
Sunday Noon to 5 pm

320 S STATE STREET - Phone 663-4121 - ANN ARBOR MICH

THE ANNUAL
SALARY SUPPLEMENT
Available December 5
at the
Ilinian n iih miin Mifin

AT RICHARDSON'S
SANTA FOUND EVERYTHING
FROM CANDY TO GIFTS, AND SANTA RINGS
AND GIFT WRAP AND TREE LIGHTS,
AND THINGS THAT SMELL NICE
CANDY CANES AND MISTLETOE
ALL AT A GREAT PRICE!

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan