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December 05, 1986 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-12-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

OPINION

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Page 4

Friday, December 5, 1986

The Michigan04

theAth4an tWl
Edited and managed by students at The University of Michigan
Vol. XCVII, No. 65 420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
Unsigned editorials represent a majority of the Daily's Editorial Board
A1 other cartoons, signed articles, and letters do not necessarily represent the opinion of the Daily.
Administrators: hands off the Greeks!
Greek non-academic life

DON- MAYBE WE SHOULD NtMIT
TH~E IRAN DEKL WAS A MSTK

MAKE. YOU LoOV WEAK

BUT IT ?AIST M TIME ro
CUT OU .LO~S

'f f

S11

T'A\ GOIN& To

LET YOU OFF EASy
THIS TIM AROAUND.

IN HER.E A&AI t1
00

GUILT,~ Y00 1 "op
00
F 00

_(E =

u a

0

I

UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATORS
have re.;ently intervened in
conflicts between Greek houses
and their non-student neighbors.
Associate Vice-President for
Student Services Thomas Easthope
has served as a tattle-tale by
informing the national directorships
of Greek organizations of alleged
Greek improprieties at chapters
here in Ann Arbor. While the
Daily has long held reservations
about life in the Greek system, the
Daily has even more serious
reservations about administrative
control of non-academic life.
Neighbors of some Greek houses
are up in arms over loud and
rowdy party behavior at Greek
houses. Such a conflict will
always exist between Greek houses
and their Ann Arbor neighbors.
There is great potential here for
administrators to set themselves up
with permanent jobs policing the
Greeks.
Administrators have no sanction

I

ri.i :.: . :.i

to nark on the Greeks, however,
because the University does not
own the property of the Greek
houses. Nor does the University
provide funding to the Greeks.
There is and should be no
connection between the Greek
houses and the University
administration.
Like the administration's
proposed code of non-academic
conduct, the administration's
interference in Greek non-academic
life is a symptom of the power
struggle between students and
administrators. Far from even
claiming to facilitate student
education here at the University,
the University administration
openly takes the side of non-
student neighbors.
The University administration has
no business reporting on Greeks or
otherwise taking sides on issues in
the private lives of Greek students.
It is a misappropriation of
University resources and a power-
grab by the administration.

-11 t 1

L

WSNEIGH-1FCki COM~PANISSr-LIEvE So OUR7Z Po&IPM FoRPRPERITY IS
IN A1(RMT IMPLE:
SoL~t1oN.. NOT Gc0JP-9NMENT I J. CUT" AND Z. REDUCE
\NERtRECE TA\XES REGULATIM~\
r o r
,KTr.Ttow CtTLZ-NS of 'oL.AND - IAQ ?MU~K \WILL COST YOU MoZt,.. $1EADV
FotLoWIN&?OLICIE5 \NILL COST
v5 NOW. Yo t'rAOP F!

P555s MUMBALE
A. POUND) OF MMAT W! JLL COST YOU
TWICE YOURl
YIOUQLY/

YOU'LL BE IN RAL SEIo TloUS 2LU
IE TRUIS HAPPENS A TENT T
AM FRO WAIT STRET s
sAN asaut0d tol anyo..
dtO 'LhEm IN a N tha USt hey ha
MinTAY aCtTACgTS coNf!r 'x
undestanableand uiteco a
4m1,1- on O e - yt o d eap - J w i t
~L~v~v
AWN A PIROTSTR rIKE. WILL COST
'YOU 'ThQGV-
tAs 1sw
peIoplN eseial mn T ke
sexually assaulted told anyone.
Women also do not know that
this does not have to happen
them and that they hae
survived a rape.
Kulkis' anger and deferi -
siveness at having to confroi
this reality of our culture.i&
understandable and quite cons 2.
mon. rOne way. to -deal with
this is to talk with oiier;
people, especially men. Th t~f
are also workshops available
and more information about
rape prevention at the Sexiual'
Assault Prevention and Aware -"
1nesss Center, 3100 Michigan't
Union, 763-5865. '

Police state logic

ROWDY GREEK PARTY behavior
has engendered an hysterical
response by neighbors and the city
government. The city has
established a special squad of
police officers to tame or break up
Greek parties on weekends.
So far, the police have managed
to make Greek parties more to the
liking of neighbors. The Greek
system may even have needed
some kind of outside help to deflate
the competitive social pressures
amongst the houses involved to
throw the best parties with the most
beer and unrestrained behavior.
Unfortunately, the tactics used by
the police include entrapment.
High school age informers infiltrate
Greek parties to find out whether
or not minors are obtaining
alcohol.
Once again police intervention has
involved an extravagant use of city
funds - $4,000 in police overtime
Blue roses:
it's onl
THE BIG TEN season has reached
its natural culmination: Bo Schem-
bechler's Michigan Wolverines
won the conference championship
and now travel to Pasadena for the
Rose Bowl.'
Recent history is abnormal. The
Wolverines have not played in the
New Year's Day classic since
1982, when the UCLA Bruins beat
them 24-14 after knocking
Michigan quarterback Steve Smith
out of the game with a shoulder
injury. Since then, Bo's boys have
visited the Sugar, Holiday, and
Fiesta Bowls but triumphed in only
the last, a 27-23 win over
Nebraska last Jan. 1.
The Wolverines are the .Big
Ten's most successful team. With
675 victories against 224 defeats,
Michigan has posted a "W" on
Saturday 75 percent of the time in
the last 107 years. The last 18
seasons, Schembechler has reigned
on the Michigan sideline, a king in
regal'maize and blue attire - and a

pay for the first weekend of party-
bashing alone. Perhaps over-
reacting neighbors of the Greek
houses should pay for this police
service for a weekend, so as to put
their complaints in. better
perspective.
Obviously if every social problem
including quarrels amongst neigh-
bors requires police involvement,
then sooner or later, every third
person will have to work as a
police officer. Thus the response
to the Greeks' distasteful behavior
is equally immature and certainly
more dangerous in the long run.
With one-quarter of that $4,000
spent for one weekend of party-
bashing, the city could have paid
the University-wide Greek
organizations or some outside
agency to police individual Greek
parties. This would leave the
police force to work against rape
and other serious unresolved
problems in Ann Arbor.

LETTERS:
Passit
To The Daily:
I am writing in response to
a letter on the issue of "passing
up" women at football games
("New Feminists Attack Men
Too Much;" 11/19/86) as
there are many issues raised in
that letter that I feel an urgent
need to address.
It is unfortunate that Kulkis
constantly focuses on many
stereotypes of feminists
because it allows him to ignore
the main issue. In the original
article on passing women up,
author Yvonne Bloch did not
solely criticize men and stated
that both women and men need
to work to change our culture.
The reality is that more than
90% of perpetrators of sexual
assault are men. This does not
mean that all men are rapists,
but it does mean that men need
to ask themselves why rape is
a crime by men against women
and realize that the occurence of
rape is connected to our
attitudes about women and not
just a random violent act.
Using statistics alone we
know that rape is not a random
act. FBI statistics tell us that
60-80 percent of all assaults are
by someone the rape survivor
knows and 1 out of 3 women
will be sexually assaulted in
her lifetime. To explain why
someone we know and trust
would do this to us and why
rape is so pervasive in our
culture means we must lookrat
attitudes involved that per -
petuate myths about rape: the
myth that rape is sexual vs. the
fact that it is an act of power
and domination; and the myth
that women are supposed to be
weak and passive while men
must be forceful and aggressive
in every situation, especially
sexual ones. These myths are
perpetuated by the media, by
our friends and family, and by
dangerous rituals like passing
women up at football games.
Unfortunately, passing wo -
men up at football games is
not harmless fun brought about
to heighten the. compet -
itiveness of the moment. If in
fact other objects, like beach -
balls, have been passed up why
then do we pass up women or
representations of women? Is a
woman the same as a
beachball? Batting a beach ball
around is not a violent assault

s
Igup is
being abused in football stands)
it creates a climate in which
violence against women is
condoned because we learn that
it is alright to take our anger
out on women and that women
somehow deserve this kind of
abuse, which they do not.

y natural

not har

v'

After winning so often in the
regular season, it is about time Bo
prevailed in Pasadena.
Unlike Michigan's 26-24
clipping of the obtuse Ohioans,
nothing is guaranteed in the Rose
Bowl. But Bo knows well the
unpredictability of California. He
also knows how to win. And for
the first time in his career,
Schembechler will find an
advantage in Pasadena: a non-West
coast opponent.
Bo captured his first Rose Bowl
victory in 1981 when the
Wolverines ripped Washington,
23-6. In previous years the
opponent's home-field advantage,
arguably hurt Michigan. But this
year Arizona State is the foe, and
although the Sun Devils present a
difficult challenge they cannot reap
the rewards of a USC or UCLA
playing the Rose Bowl before its
hometown faithful.
Hostile ASU fans will not force
a loss on the Wolverines, nor will

It is impo'rtant to understand
that people's stereotypical
attitudes of 'what women and
men should be in our culture
are elements that feed into
sexual assault, especially date
and acquaintance rape. Passing
up women, whether plastic or
real, at football games, is not
merely a game. It is one act
along the continuum of
violence against women which
reinforces the stereotype that
women should be weak,
passive, playthings who would
not mind such treatment. In
defending this type of action,
Reagan has
To the Daily:
For the past six years, the
Reagan Administration has
been remarkably successful in
its conduct of a series of
disinformation campaigns
designed to win public support
for its militarist and right-wing
agenda. "Peacekeeper Miss-
iles""and the "Strategic Defense
Intitiative" envelop the nuclear
arms build-up in a benign and
peaceful glow; anecdotes about
welfare cheats and drug-crazed
criminals portray the assault on
social welfare and civil liberties
as a righteous mission;
mercenary terrorists in Central
America are labeled "freedom
fighters" to justify U.S.
involvement in and funding of
the bloody Contra war; the
failed Rejkjavik summit is
described as an arms control
triumph; and the list goes on
and on.
Yet in 'his most recent
effort to rewrite the news - by
casting his arms-for-hostages
deal with Iran in terms of a
strategic coup to promote U.S.
interests in the Middle East -
President Reagan appears for.
once to have left even most of
his loyalhsupporters
incredulous. What accounts for
this first and major failure?
Surely the President's Iran
story is no more preposterous

his disinformatio
(and especially Col. Qaddafi
and the Ayatollah Khomeni) as
"madmen," communism as the
root of all evil, and the poor as
promiscuous and lazy, it is
not hard to sell policies which
blame or injure these demons.
But in rationalizing his Iranian
venture, the President had to
tell us that there are people in
Khomeni's entourage - in the
very lair of the hostage-takers
whose demoniacal behavior

n Waterloo
was so useful to Reagan's
1980 election campaign -3
whom we must now consider
good guys!
Little wonder that it just
won't wash. Dare we hope,
that this failure will amount to
Reagn's disinformation'
Waterloo?
-ThomasE
Weisskopf
November 14, 1986

Kulkis is defending dangerous
sex role stereotyping which
forces men to only relate to
women in eggressive, dom -
inant, and violent ways.
Kulkis also feels the
feminist view is that all men
want to rape women. Ideo -
logical positions aside, men
and women are not concious of
what rape is. In fact, in a recent
study of 7,000 students at 35
colleges around the country,
researcher Mary Koss found
that 1 out of 12 men admitted
to having fulfilled the pre -
vailing defintion of rape or
attempted rape, yet virtually
none of these men identified
themselves as rapists. That
means that men do not consider
forcing women to have sexual
contact against their will rape.
Koss also found that less then
1/3 of the women on college
campuses who had been

-Jennifer
S. Akfital
Administrative
Assistant
UM Sexual Assault
Prevention and
Awareness Center
T y "4

T T

Daily caption lacked taste
To The Daily: raising ceremonies worldw
On November 12, you and they were all synchron
printed a photograph of three to take place at the same t
"unidentified Reserve Officer that President Reagan place
Training Corps" members wreath on the Tomb of
raising the flag near North Unknown Soldier. The
Hall. The caption, "Flagging," Force ROTC detacment her
made the photo humorous and the University participated
remarkably similar in nature to this ceremony. By neglec
the photo and caption to print the story, and insi
innappropriately and incorrectly turn the photo into
labeled "Defiant" in a previous lighthearted item, the D
issue of the Daily. Therein failed to recognize and ret
lies the problem. Tuesday's *the significance of1
ceremony was a special ceremony. By the way,
ceremony for Veteran's Day. "unidentified" cadets are C
I provided the Daily news Col Russ Mathers; C/Ltf
office with information in Mike Crawford, and C/C
advance, about the ceremony, Greg Green. The did a sup
which the Daily neglected to job as the flag detail.
Drint. Perhaps your readers - r1U iucl '

ide '
ize
ime
ed a
the;
Air,
e at
d in
:tin~
ea
aily
por
thed
the;
C/Lt'
Col'
:apt:
perb

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