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October 10, 1986 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-10-10

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- The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 10, 1986 - Page 3,
Nite Owl van to begin expanded route Sunday

By MELISSA BIRKS
Tanya Mathis reclines on a seat
in the Nite Owl van, the heater
conquering a 40-degree chill
rutside, and recalls how she used to
walk alone at night to her sorority
house.
"I was scared stiff," Mathis, a
North Campus resident, said. "I was
walking in the street; I was carrying
an umbrella, and I was walking
really fast."
"THIS drops me off right at the
"Alpha Xi Delta house," she added.
"Now that I know that, I'll never
alk again."
V Mathis, an art school freshman,
was one of about 12 students who
rode the Nite Owl Wednesday night
within half-an-hour. According to
the driver, Residential College
senior Matt Wray, Nite Owl
averages about 80 passengers on a
nice night. During the winter, that
number can escalate to around 150
passengers for each 15-minute loop
around campus.
Mathis relies on the Nite Owl's
urrent stops, but beginning
Sunday, the route will be changed
when a student- and faculty-spurred
initiative to expand the system
takes effect.

THE University's Campus
Safety Committee has worked on
improving Nite Owl for at least
three years, Diane McClaran, the
committee chair, said last month
after the University's executive
officers approved more than
$50,000 to expand the service.
Under the new proposal, two
vans - instead of the one that now

assistant to the vice-president for
student services and a member of
the Campus Safety Committee, the
service will be evaluated this year
before a decision is made on
funding for spring and summer.
CURRENTLY, the bus
makes a loop that starts at the
Undergraduate Library, circles
around Oxford housing, and passes

"Most people who ride it are serviced by it. You
don't get people complaining if they're on the bus."
-Matt Wray
Nite Owl driver

previous route did not consider,"
such as the medical school library
and the dental school, Wilson said.
MOTIVATIONS for riding
the bus range from convenience to
fear of assault. According to Wray,
the service is most used on rainy,
cold evenings when the legal 15-
passenger capacity often doubles.
"It's nearly impossible to turn
people away," Wray said.
"It's a nice rest from walking
home," LSA sophomore Nancy
Singer said. But she added that, on
the evenings she visits a friend who
lives at Hill and Tappan, "there is
no way I'd walk (there) alone. It's
far."
RUMORS of rapes in the
campus area and increased awareness
about sexual assaults have spurred
students to ride the bus.
LSA sophomore Linda McFall
said she rides Nite Owl "because of
the rapes that have been going on."
In September, there were four
reported rapes and attempted rapes
around campus.
McFall said she heard there were
18 rapes during the first week of
school. "I heard everything," she
said.
LSA freshman Tom Kolasa said

he rides the bus every night for
convenience. Although he said, "I
wouldn't want to walk around after
12 midnight," Kolasa isn't worried
about being assaulted.
According to Wray, ridership on
the bus is "overwhemingly

GREATEST
fEATj S S

women;" the nightly average is 70
women to 6 men.
"(Men) think it's for women,"
Wray said. "They're supposed to
brave the elements. That's not
necessarily so."

runs- will cover two routes that
extend south to the Athletic
Campus and north to the Medical
School Campus. The service will
include an additional bus running
during mid-terms, finals, and other
busy times in the year.
The proposal that went to the
executive officers also requested
money to run the service during
spring and summer terms.
According to Roselle Wilson,

through the Hill dorms area.
"Most people who ride it are
serviced by it. You don't get people
complaining if they're on the bus,"
Wray said. "It's a really good
service, but it's limited."
According to Wilson, the new
routes were designed to include
"population pockets" where a high
concentration of students who don't
get the service live. The new routes
include "many points that the

'Asbestos in Mojo'
lisp laces residents

By JENNIFER DOUGLAS
Two Mosher-Jordan residents
moved back into their room last
;night after living in a lounge for
-two days while exposed asbestos
was removed from a pipe in their
ceiling.
'Engineering freshmen Jeff Fuller
:said, he noticed water dripping from
Phe ceiling of Room 457 about
noon Tuesday. When he looked up,
he saw steam leaking from a pipe.
FULLER said a maintenance
crew arrived within 30 minutes.
The workers summoned a pipe
repair crew, but discovery of
asbestos halted repairs until
Wednesday, when a special asbestos
crew started removing the chemical.
Fuller and his roommate,
engineering freshman Gary
orman, stayed in the lounge until
yesterday, when workers installed
new insulation and repaired a crack
.in the pipe.
~:According to Ken Schaltze,
:director of the University's Office
of Occupational Safety and
Environmental Health, the asbestos
did not pose a health threat. Since
the asbestos became wet, he said,
its potentially cancer-causing
Vceicl did not escape into the
air.
HE ADDED that the asbestos
was wrapped and sealed at the time
of the leak, which reduced the
possibility of inhaling it.
Fuller said he is also convinced
that the asbestos will not affect his
health. "They turned off the steam
pretty quickly, so I'm not that
worried. If it would have been on
for four or five hours, I might have
Pbeen concerned."
According to Schaltae, asbestos
and leaks in steam lines are both
common in University residence

halls. "Since many of the
buildings were constructed long
before anyone knew about the
dangers of asbestos, the majority of
residence halls may have asbestos,"
he said.
Last month, exposed asbestos
was found in several rooms at
Helen Newberry and Betsy Barbour
residence halls. Two students lived
in a Barbour guest room for two
days while workers sealed and
removed the insulation. One
student, concerned for her health,
moved out of the dorm.
All University residence halls are
currently being surveyed for
asbestos as part of a new program
which requires periodic checks of
insulation. Schaltze said checks
on all rooms are scheduled for
completion by the end of the year,
depending on the contractor that
will be hired for the work.
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Candidates
debate over
environment
(Continued from Page 1)
responsible for clean-up. She said
the difficulty is that "it is more cost
efficient to ignore the law than to
-conform to the law."
Dale Apley, who is running
against Pollack, recommended that
;the state get away from building
landfills for toxic and hazardous
'vastes and develop alternatives such
as recycling and incineration. He
said he was upset that a $350
ymillion bond bill earmarked for the
development of new programs was
approved by the Senate but "mdt a
quiet death in the House."
Apley said his top.
environmental priority, if elected,
would be to develop a state toxic
waste disposal program.
Also at the forum were
.,niversity graduate student Dean
Baker, a Second District candidate
for U.S. Congress, and Cynthia
Hudgins, district representative for
incumbent Rep. Carl Pursell.
Baker accused Pursell of not
fully supporting the federally-funded
Superfund program, which provides
money to clean up toxic waste
sites. Hudgins said, "Superfund has
been debated and redebated and has
ad enough hearings and discussion

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