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September 25, 1986 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-09-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Page 2- The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 25, 1986
Inquiring
Photographer
By Dean Randazzoj

"Do you think that the newly installed emergency phones
will have a noticeable effect on rape around campus?"

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Sebastian Dunn, Resident-
al College senior: I think
that it will have some
effect, but since most rapes
occur far from phones it's
not the only thing that can
be done to stop rape.

Sheryl Trivers, Business
school senior: Since I am
an R.A. at Couzens I have
made it a point to tell my
residents where the phones
are located because I think
it will have a positive
effect. I am pleased to see
that some progress has
been made to help prevent
assualt on campus.

Carmen Elston, LSA
senior: I don't think they
will because their
locations are in places
where a rape wouldn't
occur. So as far as a
preventative measure, I
would say no.

Geneva Kachman, LSA
junior: No because the
phones are not in secluded
places. They should be in
areas where rapes are
more likely to occur. Who
gets raped in front of the
Chem. building?

Mike Rumpf Urban
planning graduate stu-
dent; Yes, I think that they
will help. The phones dis-
tinguish that there is a
problem and that some-
thing is being done about it
, out in the field where it all
happens.

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Marcia Milito, LSA
senior: Yes, the phones
will help but they wont get
rid of rape altogether.
Probably their strongest
point is that they make the
campus conscientious that
a problem exists.

Ralph Story, LSA English,
lecturer: I can't say
statistically but it should
have impact. It will at
least give women the
feeling that they are
protected. The phones are
accessible, which is
definitely a plus. Rape has
been a problem for some
time in Ann Arbor.

Laura Apkarian, LSA
senior: Rape is a violent
and fast act. I don't see
how someone would have a
chance to get to a phone
unless they knew that they
were being followed. But if
another citizen heard or

Tim Shanahan, Engin -
eering junior: The best
that the phones could do is
report a rape that has
already occured. I don't.
see how they will prevent a
rapist from trying or how
they will be helpful in
catching a rapist after the
act.

Rob Fish, LSA freshman:
Yes, I think that the
emergency phones will
make women feel more
secure and potential
rapists fear getting
caught.

IN BRIEF
COMPILED FROM ASSOCIATED PRESS REPORTS
Chemicals flood into river
MIDLAND, Mich.-Michigan environmental workers
detected up to twenty industrial chemicals in the the Tittabawassee
River after Dow Chemical Co.'s treatment plant flooded, but dont
believe the spills endangered residents, an official said yesterday
One chemical-hexachlorobenzene-was detected in amounts:
higher than state water quality standards, said Terry:
Walkington of the state Department of Natural Resources*:
Saginaw district office.
Since hexacholorobenzene is a cancer-causing chemical which
quickly accumulates in fish, the state will monitor fish to detect:
any contamination, he said. But he added: "We don't think the'
quantity discharged is an immediate health or environmental
concern."
The tested chemicals have dropped "to background levels, and
many of them are not detectable," Wilkington said. Some of the
chemicals may have come from sources other than the Dow plant,
he said.
Medical f ield abuses drugs
BOSTON-Nearly forty percent of doctors under age forty
admitted in a survey that they used marijuana or cocaine to get
high with friends, and a quarter of doctors of all ages said they
recently treated themselves with mind-affecting drugs.
Overall, more than half the physicians and three-quarters of the
medical students who participated in the Harvard University
survey said they have used drugs at least once for self-treatment, to
get high or to help them stay awake.
Only one percent of the doctors surveyed said their drug use had
ever caused them to give poor care to patients.
"When psychoactive drug use becomes a fad and is approved by
the broad spectrum of society, just about all groups get involved,"
said Dr. William McAuliffe, the study's director. "That includes
physicians and pharmacists as well, the people who are usually the
keepers of the drugs."
French Prime Minister
urges UN to halt terrorism
UNITED NATIONS-Prime Minister Jacques Chirac of
France urged the United Nations yesterday to stamp out
international terrorism, which has cost his country nine lives in
the past two weeks.
Chirac told the 41st General Assembly that terrorism is the most
urgent challenge to the world and requires concrete counter-
measures, including joint action to improve security in the air
and on the sea.
"The tragic events in Istanbul, Karachi and Paris prove once
again that terorism has become the.systematic weapon of a war that
knows no borders or seldom has a face," Chirac told delegates.
Nine people have been killed and more than 160 injured in five
bombings in Paris since September 8.
Space agency to probe comet
NEW YORK-The European Space Agency has committed $400
million to a mission to land a space probe on a comet and bring
back as much as 30 pounds of its nucleus to Earth, a scientist said.
yesterday.
"We're not just talking about a hypothetical mission-it's going,
to fly," said John Wood of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for
Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass. The launch could come as
early as 1995, he said, but likely will be at least several years later
than that.
Wood, a geologist, is a member of a committee of U.S. and
European scientists who have been meeting for a year to propose,
experiments for the unmanned flight and are j.ust completing their.
report to the European Space Agency.
Police intensify search for
suspected murderer Jackson
WRIGHT CITY, Missouri-Police intensified the search
yesterday for a former mental patient sought in a three-state
rampage of murder and abduction.
Authorities said they believed he was still in the area although
the trail was growing cold.
"We're assuming that he's still around here," said Missouri
Highway Patrol Capt. John Ford. "We're talking about a man who
has demonstrated that he has no respect for life or property. If he

were out of this area, I think something would have happened by
now."
Federal, state and local law officers have been hunting for
Michael Jackson, 41, since he allegedly went on a crime spree that
started Monday in Indianapolis.
Ford said the search would not be called off unless evidence
surfaced that Jackson was out of the area. He pointed out that there
had been no new reports of abductions or stolen cars.

11

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saw someone
might help.

in trouble, it

GROUP THERAPY~
FOR SEXUALLY ABUSED WOMEN
Therapy Group forming at The Counseling Center for
women students who had sexual experiences with
members of their families and who experience contin-
ued problems in living. If you have any question about
your participation in the group being appropriate,
please call. Group size is limited, and a modest fee will
be charged. Group will meet 1%/ hours weekly from
September to April.
CALL 764-9466.

ANTIQUARIAN BOOKFAIR
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER28,10-5
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POLICE
NOTES
Students injured by
b.b.'s
Two West Quad residents were
accidentally shot with a b.b. gun
Tuesday night during the annual
South Quad-West Quad shouting
match.
According to Bob Pifer,
assistant director of public safety,
the case is under investigation
with the Ann Arbor Police
department. Thereare no
suspects in the shooting and no
leads on where the weapon was
shot from. Neither victim went to
the hospital, Pifer said.
Jason Meyer and Steve Lee,
engineering freshmen, were in a
room with about ten other
residents on the fourth floor of
Rumsey House during the shout-
out, when the bullets were shot into
the room.
Officials investigate
fire
Officials at the Ann Arbor Fire
Department are investigating the
cause of a fire at 2738 Hikone that
injured two people and killed one
Tuesday afternoon, according to
Robert Murphy, assistant fire
chief.
The fire was confined to one
apartment in a six-unit
townhouse complex. Firefighters
removed a woman and her two
children from the blaze, while the
woman's husband escaped by
jumping about ten feet from a
window, Murphy said.
One of the two children died
Tuesday after being taken to. the
University Hospital.
The woman is in the University
Burn Center, and the child is in
Mott's Children Hospital.
Four of twelve firefighters were
sent to the University Hospital for
heat exhaustion, Murphy said.
-Melissa Birks
Correction
Michigan Student Assembly
LSA representative John
Fitzgerald was dismissed from
the assembly Tuesday night
because he missed 12 meetings.
His resignation from the
assembly will not be accepted
because he was dismissed before
he could resign. ' Replacement
names will be submitted by LSA
+iA n+ rmvnment A MS A

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hJ~e f3idtqmui Dai
Vol. XCVII -No.16
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday
through Friday during the fall and winter terms. Subscription
rates: September through April-$18 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the
city. One term-$10 in town; $20 outside the city.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and
subscribes to Pacific News Service and the Los Angeles Times

Syndicate.
Editor in Chief....................ERIC MATTSON
Managing Editor ..RACHEL GOATLIEB
News Editor ...............JERRY MARKON
C.ty Editor.......................CHRISTY RIEDEL
r'eatures Editor....................AMY MINDELL
NEWS STAFF: Eve Becker, Melissa Birks,
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Associate Opinion Page
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OPINION PAGE STAFF: Rosemary
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Associate Sports
Editors.........................DAVE ARETHA
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RICK KAPLAN
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Douglas Volan.
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Sales Manager.....................DIANE BLOOM
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DISPLAY SALES: Barb Calderoni, Irit
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