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September 25, 1986 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-09-25

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The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 25, 1986 - Page 3

TAs'

union votes to

authorize strike

vote

By BRIAN BONET
In a show of hands vote
members of the University's
teaching assistants' union voted
to give its steering committee and
bargaining team the power to
authorize a strike vote, if a
settlement is not reached with the
University during tomorrow's
negotiations
Approximately 180 members
voted for the measure and 10
members voted against. Most of
the union's 1,700 members were
not present and did not vote.
IF AN agreement is not
reached between the Graduate
Employees Organization and the
University there will be a mail
balloting of all union's members
of the union on whether or not to
strike.
Mediation talks between the
GEO and the University began
last week in Detroit. Edmund
Philips of the Michigan
Employment Relations Com-
mision mediated.
According to Alice Haddy,
GEO president and chemistry
TA, union members feel that the

talks brought them no closer to a
settlement.
"(The University) has been
dragging negotiations on and
on," Haddy said.
THE DISPUTE centers around
economic issues. The GEO is
asking for a 5.7 percent salary
increase, a 10 percent tuition
waiver increase, and paid TA
training in all departments.
According to a GEO newsletter,
the University is offering a 4.7
percent salary increase, a 3
percent tuition waiver, and paid
TA training in only some
departments.
The University Chief
Negotiator, Colleen Dolan-
Greene, refused to confirm or
comment on these statistics,
saying that it would be against,
University policy to comment on
the negotiations.
UNION members say ther
University's offer does not meet
the high cost of living in Ann
Arbor, the rising tuition fees, and
leaves them with less buying
power than last year.
"As far as pay, we're not doing

so well, and we're living in a city
where we can't afford it," Haddy
said. "They've got the
money...it's there...and they're
not giving us enough. This
means we're not appreciated."
One teaching assistant, who
asked not to be identified, felt that
the leadership of the GEO called
the meeting to "rubber stamp" a
decision that they had already
made. The teaching assistant
fears that a strike would fail
because the "vast majority will
not walk out."
"THE long term goals of a
union should be to continue to help
its membership. If a strike, fails,
it will wipe out the credibility of
the union," the TA said.
"The University doesn't see the
union as a particularly strong
organization that they have to
worry about. The leadership (of
the union) and less than one
hundred (GEO members) are the
only ones that take it seriously."
In addition to the strike vote
authorization, a provisional
strike committe was formed at
Tuesday night's meeting.

Daily Photo by JAE KIM

Puzzled
A student studies in the courtyard of the Art and Architecture Building on North Campus.

New ei
By ROB EARLE
Adding more humanities
courses to engineering students'
schedules and improved parking
and lighting on North Campus
are top priorities for the new
Associate Dean of the College of
Engineering.
Chemical Engineering Prof.
Erdogan Gulari was appointed
Associate Dean for Academic
Affairs on Sept. 1, replacing
Charles Vest, who became
engineering dean in July.
GULARI said he will "be fairly
active in looking at our
undergraduate curriculum to see
what we need to add to make our
students better prepared for the
outside world." One area he will
evaluate is the college's
humanities requirement.

igineering dean places emphasis on humanities

"I think all of-us in the college
believe that you cannot make a
complete engineer if they do not
have some background in the
humanities," he said. "After all,
all our interactions involve
human interaction-we have to
know how to express ourselves."
Gulari said the backlog of
work from the summer has kept
him from looking into other
specific areas of the
undergraduate curriculum.
HIS NEW responsibilities also
include the layout of the college.
One problem he's addressing is
the lack of adequate student
parking on North Campus.
Gulari is negotiating with
University Parking Operations
for more student parking near the
Dow Building and the new

Electrical Engineering and
Computer Science (EECS)
Building.
In addition to new spaces near
North Campus Commons,
students will be able to park in a
new lot across from the North
campus parking structure.
Gulari says lights will be
installed and new sidewalks
constructed to make getting to and
from the lots safer.
He also hopes to build a new
library on North Campus to
supplement the Dow Library study
space.
"(Dow) is small for our student
body," he said, noting that the new
library could also serve students
in the schools of architecture, art,
and music.
GULARI is confident he can do

well as associate dean, though he
is a little apprehensive about
living up to the standards set by
Vest.
"Dean Vest had done such a
superb job that I knew from the
beginning that it would be almost
impossible just to keep up with that
standard," he said.
"Dean Vest is quite low key but
he works very hard. I like to think
I also work very hard," he said.
"I'm not sure whether I'm low key
or not- I'd like to think I'm just a
low key person."
GULARI said his style and
Vest's are similar; they both get

things done "through hard work
and not a lot of talk and show."
Vest cited a similar reason for
his selection of Gulari.
"I wanted someone who would
work energetically with me,"
Vest said, though he stressed his
main criteria for a new associate
dean was that he or she come from
within the current faculty.
Vest also "wanted someone
who I felt complemented the talent
that's currently in the deans
office." He said Gulari was
known as an experimentalist, as
opposed to a theorist like the other
engineering deans.

VEST said he was "very
pleased with the reactions " to
Gulari's appointment. "I've
gotten a lot of good feedback."
"I was happy," said Frank
Donahue, associate chairman of
the chemical engineering
department, "It's always nice to
have a close friend in the
administration."
Donahue said Gulari is like
Vest and former dean James
Duderstadt in that he has "a sense
of where the college needs to go."
Donahue said Gulari has
worked well with the college
administration in the past.

Exposed asbestos plagues dorms

By MARC ROSSEN
A University official presented
the results of a survey on exposed
asbestos insulation in two
University residen-e halls
during a question and answer
session at one of the surveyed
dorms last night.
The survey conducted in Betsy
Barbour and Helen Newberry
residence halls revealed exposed
asbestos from insulation which
may pose a health risk in both
residence halls. There were few
cases of exposed asbestos in

students' rooms in Newberry, but
there was some exposed asbestos
in students' room in Barbour.
Most of the problem areas were in
the basement, according to Gary
Monroe from the Office of
Occupational Safety and
Environmental Health, who
presented the findings. Sierra
Analytical, a private firm,
conducted the survey in
conjunction; with Monroe's office.
A private contractor will begin
work to seal the exposed asbestos
in Barbour and Newberry next

week. Monroe said he hoped that
the work would be completed
within a week and a half.
Most University residence
halls will be surveyed by the end
of the year, Monroe said.
If asbestos particles are
inhaled, lung cancer could be
contracted. Asbestos fibers can be
released from exposed insulation
made of asbestos.
Daily staff writer Martha
Sevetson filed a report for this
story.

Regents e
By MICHAEL LUSTIG
For the first time, members of
the University's Board of Regents
accepted an operating budget
surpassing $1 billion, at their
monthly meeting last week. But
the money won't meets rising
costs, University officials say.
Most University funding
comes from state allocations and
tuition fees. Officials raised
tuition this year, and state
appropiations topped $200 million,
but many needs will go unfilled
because there is not enough
money.
In a report to the regents ,
University Vice President for
Academic Affairs and provost
James Duderstadt said $9 million
more is necessary for restoration

ipprove ne"
and improvement in five areas:
salary increases, improvement of
graduate student financial aid,
rebuilding the hard science
departments in LSA, creation of a
new computerized University
library system and book
restoration, and replenishing of
general equipment.
DUDERSTADT cited the
natural sciences, specifically the
astronomy, biology, chemistry,
geology, mathematics, physics,
and statistics departments, as
areas needing major im-
provement.
"These are among the weakest,
and least adequately supported
(departments) in the University,"
Duderstadt said.
The chemistry department is

I

budge t
currently being upgraded, with
the completion of the new
chemistry building expected in
1989. But other improvements
cannot be made until the
University receives increased
funding.
Duderstadt also said that the
full $1.5 million expected for
graduate student financial aid
will be unavailable due to the lack
of funding. He said some
programs such as the Regents'
Fellowship program will provide
some aid to graduate students.
Other accommodations will be
made by transferring some
recurring expenses into the
General Fund to keep more
money in a reserve capacity and
available for future uses.

Research, teaching quality required for tenure

I

Campus Cinema
Psycho (Alfred Hitchcock,
1960) CG, 7 and 9 p.m., Aud A.
Visual clues foreshadow
-eventual outcomes in this
classic thriller.
The Loved One (Tony
Richardson, 1965) AAFC
,.DBL/7 p.m., Nat Sci.
A pointed satire of the
....American way of death.
Gates of Heaven (Errol Morris,
1979) AAFC DBL/9 p.m., Nat
Sci.
A documentary of the bizarre
realm of Southern California's
pet lovers and pet cemeteries.
Annie Hall (Woody Allen,
1977) MTF DBL/7:30 p.m.,
Mich. Film will be shown
.pending construction.
,Woody Allen and Diane
Keaton star in this story of
neurotic love and changing
lifestyles.
Manhattan (Woody Allen,
1979) MTF DBL/9:30 p.m.,
Mich. Film will be shown
pending construction.
A personal view of romance,
excitement of the city, and the
problems of modern
relationships.
Speakers
Dr. Viliam Krivan -"The
Rn'D nlr. *na 4.n A-nr a., i

Technological System of the
Anga People of New Guinea,"
12-1 p.m., 2009 Museums
Building.
Janet Giele - "Cohort
Analysis of Women's
Changing Life Patterns," 1986
Adult Research Seminar
Series, 12-1:30 p.m., Center for
Continuing Education of
Women, second floor,
Comerica Bank, corner of
North University and South
Thayer Streets.
Meetings
United Farm Workers Support
Group -7 p.m., fourth floor
amphitheater, Rackham.
Michigan Alliance for
Disarmament - 7:30 p.m.,
Michigan Union.
Michigan Freshman
Connection-7 p.m., Anderson
Rooms, first floor, Michigan
Union.
Archery Club -7 p.m.,
Colliseum.
C.A.R.P. Organization
Meeting -7 p.m., Room 2209,
Michigan Union.
Furthermore
dBASE III Plus Beginner's
Demonstration - Richard

(Continued from Page1)
theless, he said, the University is
giving out signals that teaching
is important.
One of the ways LSA is trying
to emphasize teaching is by
requiring more formal docu-
mentation of teaching quality.
Walker says that a few years ago,
"Teaching quality could have
been based on unsystematic
methods, such as hearsay from a
few students or the department
chairman writing a letter stating
the competence of the teacher."
The LSA Blue Ribbon
Commission, a group set up in
Dec. 1983 to study changing
trends in the college,
recommended in its April report
that the college require a
consistent method of evaluating
faculty members. The report also
recommended that student
evaluations be standardized
throughout the college.
"TENURE is a departmental
matter," says commission
member Lewis Kleinsmith, a
professor of biology. "There is no
uniform quality control system; it
should be the college's
responsibility."
Currently, although each
department must document
teaching quality, there is no
standard method for evaluating
that quality. Most departments
use in-class evaluations created
by the Center for Research on
Learning and Teaching (CRLT),
but some have their own systems.
When the system began, each
teacher designed their own
questions, but now a departmental
committee usually determines
which questions will be on the
forms. In fall 1985, about 3,600
.. -mm,, 71nr

says the system does have its
weaknesses. "It's hard to whip up
student enthusiasm for tough
classes like statistics. There
needs to be a test of what the
students learned, not just teacher
biases."
The physics department uses
its own system as well.
Department Chairman Lawrence
Jones says the department started
its system before the CRLT
system began. "Our system
worked well, so we decided to keep
with it," said Jones. He added
that the department has discussed
adopting the CRLT system, but no
decision has been made.
STUDENTS in physics classes
do fill out a form similar to
CRLT's, and the Society of
Physics Students has been
requesting to see the results.
Jones said individual teachers
will probably decide whether to
allow students to look at the
results.
Jones agreed that teaching is
becoming an increasingly
important part of the yearly
review that all physics
department faculty members
LIBERAL ARTS
MAJORS ...
You're Needed
All Over the
World.
Ask Peace Corps volunteers why
their ingenuity and flexibility are
as viral as their degrees. They'll
tell you they are helping the
worlds poorest oeooles attain

receive.
The psychology department
expects all of its faculty to use the
CRLT forms because each year
the forms are used to help check
teaching quality. "The CRLT
scores do enter into the judgement
for salary and promotions," says
Psychology Undergraduate
Chairman Lorraine Nadelman.
Far Eastern Languages and
Literatures Department Chair-
man Luis Gomez, whose
department uses the CRLT
system, says deficiencies in
CRLT scores for untenured
faculty "weigh heavily against
them."
"Theoretically, someone could
be refused tenure because of

unsatisfactory teaching quality,
but that situation has not happened
since I became chairman five
years ago," said Gomez. He said
only a few teachers have received
poor scores, and in those cases the
department helped them improve
their teaching quality.
GO BLUE
From All Of Us At
DASCOLA STYLISTS
OPPOSITE JACOBSON'S MAPLE VILLAGE
668-9329 761-2733

ii

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VS*
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DEC.2-9, 1986
INCLUDES:
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ON DEC. 6, 1986 cc444
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AND FROM AIRPORTS, HOTELS AND GAME
. TRADITIONAL LEI GREETING
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