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January 17, 1986 - Image 14

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-01-17
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Learn abroad, st

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By Stephen Gregory
T HE HUNDREDS of students that
study abroad every year learn
more from the life around them than
they do from the classroom.
"In most cases students would be
better off staying here," said Hank
Peiter, associate director of the Cen-
ter for Western European Studies. He
adds, "chances are you'll learn less
(academically) there than you would
here."
But Peiter says personal growth
compensates for what students don't
learn academically.
Not only do you learn a lot about
other cultures, but "surprisingly you
learn an awful whopping great deal
about the United States," Peiter said.
"I have much more of an under-
standing of the stereotype of
Americans being really bad tourists
-loud, obnoxious, and always wan-
ting their own way," said LSA junior
Jen Faigel who spent last term at the
WEEKEND TRIPS*
Chicago from $ 75
Las Vegas from $249
Toronto from $ 59
VACATION SPECIALS*

University of Essex, outside of Lon-
don.
Before leaving for England, Faigel
saw the British as "cold, not very
friendly, very formal.
I thought it would make it harder
for me," Faigel said, but she
managed to break the "initial
barrier."
When Faigel and her flatmates sat
chatting in their kitchen, a British
flatmate wouldn't talk to her and con-
stantly cut her off.
"I kind of felt like I was doing
something wrong," said Faigel, but a
couple of weeks later, in the kitchen,
they suddenly "hit it off."
LSA sophomore Carolyn Huebner,
after studying a summer in Paris
between her freshman and sophomore
year, came back with a greater un-
derstanding of a common French
stereotype.
Huebner said she would "qualify"
the stereotype that Parisians are
snobbish and sometimes rude to
Americans, but this is their way of
challenging Americans so they can
show the French what they are made
of.
If students want to study overseas,
they can apply to a University-spon-
sored program like the ones Huebner
and Faigel went with.
There are over 20 University spon-
sored programs offering educational
opportunities in countries such as
Costa Rica, Sweden, Germany, and
Italy.

;uay iiie
If the University doesn't offer a
program in a desired location, studen-
ts can look at a list of programs spon-
sored by other universities at the Cen-
ter for Western European Studies.
Once students find a program that
appeals to them, James Gehlhar, the
coordinator for the International Cen-
ter, suggests they confer with faculty
and advisors in their department
about academic quality and credit
transfer.
Peiter said all credits from Univer-
sity-sponsored programs transfer, but
warned that this is not always true of
non-University sponsored programs.
Students can guarantee credit tran-
sferability by having a concentration
advisor sign a Statement of Intent to
Study Abroad form, Peiter said.
Language background is an impor-
tant consideration for selection, but a
grade point average of at least 3.0 is
the "bottom line," Peiter said.
However, if a student would like to
study art in Italy, the program will
look as favorably on art courses as it
will on Italian courses, he added.
"You find out exactly how
proficient (in a foreign language) you
really are," said Huebner, a French
major.
Initial conversations can be dif-
ficult, but Huebner usually sought out
the "Mom-types" who were a "sure
bet," eager to talk to a young
American wanting to learn about
French culture.
See TRY, Page 8

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By David Schon
FEW STUDENTS realize that an
alternative to the keg parties and
bar nights that we all know so well is
less than an hour away.
Just 45 miles from Ann Arbor, the
City of Detroit offers symphonies,
theatres, opera and dance companies
waiting to be discovered by the
student looking for something dif-
ferent.
What follows is a sampling of some
of the cultural events available in
Detroit.
A major part of the city's classical
music scene is The Detroit Symphony

Orchestra, now in its 72nd season. The
power of symphonic music can be en-
joyed on a whim during regular per-
formances Thursday through Sunday.
The symphony plays at Ford
Auditorium and Orchestra Hall,
acoustically one of the finest halls in
the country. A highlight this season is
the Images Festival, inspired by
poetry, literature, and painting,
beginning Feb. 21.
Tickets for the Detroit Symphony
are sold through Ticket World, but
student discounts are available at the
box office 90 minutes before the con-
cert.
Chamber music is becoming in-

creasingly popular as a form of
classical music. Concerts are
available in Detroit in a wide variety
of styles, presented by more than a
dozen groups. Hear the Renaissance
City Chamber Players, one of two
full-time chamber ensembles in the
country. Meet the artists at the af-
terglow of Pro Musica concerts. Have
brunch with Bach at the Detroit In-
stitute of Arts.
Detroit is home to The Michigan
Opera Theater, one of the country's
best regional opera companies. An
exciting change from the college
stage, M.O.T. next performs Puc-
cini's last opera, "Turandot" opening

March 5 at the magnificent Masonic
Temple Auditorium.
To experience Detroit is to ex-
perience the diversity of its theater,
from the historic grandeur of the
Fisher Theater to the intimacy of the
new Harmonie Park Playhouse. The
audiences, as diverse as the plays,
give a taste of life in the real world
away from the University. From the
Attic Theatre to the Milberry, from
Detroit Repertory to the Studio,
Detroit theatre is excellent and there
for the taking.
The performing arts scene would
not be complete without a mention of
dance. The Music Hall Center presen-

Detroit offers a cultural alternative for 'U

A year in Jerusalem

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Q - e
,f e
Jl R044

By Jill Oserowsky
T he plane touched down in Tel
Aviv, Israel. As most of the
passengers began to sing or cry, I
suddenly realized that my home was
on the other side of the world and I
was about to begin on a year-long ad-
venture.
I had longed for excitement
throughout my first two years at the
University of Michigan, so I elected to
spend my junior year abroad,
studying at The Hebrew University of
Jerusalem. The next 11 months were
the most exciting of my life.
I found myself climbing a desert
mountain to the fortress of Masada,
weightlessly floating in the salt-caked
Dead Sea, and bathing under a
tropical waterfall at Ein Gedi oasis.
On other trips we explored ruins of
crusader castles, inner-tubed down
the Jordan River, ate St. Peter's fish
from the Sea of Galilee in Tiberias,
and camped in a Bedouin village on
the shores of theaRed Sea in the Sinai
peninsula.
These side trips around Israel and
Egypt, a three-week jaunt through
Europe, and tuition and expenses
while at The Hebrew University cost
less than an out-of-state student's
tuition and expenses for a year at the
University of Michigan.
Tuition at Hebrew University was
$1,900, housing ran $40 per month, and
food and entertainment were $150 per
month.
Adjusting to life in Jerusalem
meant learning Hebrew, my most
challenging task. Students in the one-
year program are required to take a
six-week intensive language course.
The course was .tough, but it
worked. The hourly news broadcasts
became a coherent source of infor-
mation.
At the end of the summer we settled
into dormitories at the main campus
on Mount Scopus, overlooking the Old
City, the ancient remains of biblical
Jerusalem.
As Americans, we found ourselves
mixed with students from more than
30 different countries. Half of'
Hebrew University's 25,000'

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Freeport/Nassau from $425
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AIR ONLY** *
Amsterdam from $ 450
Frankfurt from $ 499
Grand Cayman from $ 299
Hong Kong from $1099
London from $ 491
Paris from $ 521
Seoul from $ 838

students are from outside Israel. My
hallmates hailed from Canada,
Morocco, Switzerland, South Africa,
the United States, and Israel, both
Arabs and Jews.
Most foreign students studied in
their native languages-usually
English, Spanish, and Fren-
ch-through the Overseas School. But
those who had mastered in-
termediate Hebrew were able to take
regular University courses taught in
Hebrew along with Israeli students.
I was required to take Hebrew and a
course in Israeli studies. But my
favorite assignment took place out-
side the classroom. I had to in-
terview some of Jerusalem's residen-
ts and come up with a biography of
neighborhoods in the city.
Israelis love to give advice, and
during these encounters I received
large doses. I learned to search for the
best exchange rates before converting
coveted dollars to shekels, learned to
keep my eyes wide open in public
places for suspicious objects that
could contain bombs, and learned to
shop at inexpensive open-air markets
for food instead of the commercial
supermarkets.
My first excursion into an open-air
market was like stepping into another
world. Merchants called out prices in
shekels per kilo as shoppers rushed
madly about trying to find the best
deal. Vendors lined the streets and
alley-ways selling everything from
fresh pomegranates and dates to un-
plucked-and sometimes un-
dead-chickens.
Another type of market is the
famous Arab bazaar or "shuk."
Saturdays are the perfect time for ex-
cursions into the shuk to barter for
one of the endless variety of items
such as jewelry, camel-hair rugs, pot-
tery and kafiyas-flowing Arab scar-
ves.
Dating back to the Roman period,
the shuk is a dank smelly network of
passageways descending into the
bowels of the city. Vibrant in colors and
rich in aromas from Turkish coffee,
spices, and donkeys, the shuk is
exotic.
On one occasion as I passed a
smiling Arab merchant along the Via
Dolorosa, a street in the shuk, I was
greeted with "Hey Michigan!" My
well-traveled sweatshirt had caught
his attention, and before I could walk
away from what I thought would be an
annoying comment, he showed me a
photograph of his brother who, he
said, was a student at the University
of Michigan. Sure enough-there he
was sitting on the steps of Angell Hall.
By the end of the program I realized
how much I felt at home in a country
where a few months ago I felt a half a
world away from Michigan.

(Continued from Page 3)
As for now, despite new regulations,
students are keeping the option of
Florida open, although many haven't
finalized their plans.
LSA sophomore Michael Neifach
said the new regulations "won't really
affect my decision." He added that
he'll probably "either go to Florida or
stay home" during Spring Break.

Debra Reiter, an LSA freshman,
said the law doesn't bother her
because "I don't like to drink on the
beach anyway."
Mary Gallagher, an EMU student
who organizes spring break trips to
Florida for Michigan and EMU
students, said the new regulations
haven't affected sales.
"I've already heard from quite a

Snow-capped peaks challenge skiers

SPRING BREAK
Alcohol ban won't deter Florida trips

USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS4

WHITE MARKET
Pick up your ...
FRESH DELI SANDWICHES " DIET COKE
FRESH FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

(Continued from Page 3)
MICHIGAN
9 Mt. Brighton - located 25 minutes
from Ann Arbor, Brighton offers
slopes of all ranges, among its 15
runs. Brighton offers no lodging.
Weekday lift tickets are $12.50,
weekend $15. Group rates are
available.
" Mt. Holly - Located about an
hour from Ann Arbor, Mt. Holly offers
15 runs. Lift tickets are $15 weekends,
$12 weekdays. Holly has many special
rates, including "2 for 1" $12 ski rates
Monday through Friday mornings.
* Alpine Valley - About one and
one-half hours from Ann Arbor,
Alpine has 23 runs of varying levels.
Rates vary according to day and
time, from $11 for weekdays to $15
weekends and holidays.
" Sugar Loaf - Featuring the mid-
west's steepest slope, "Awful Awful",
Sugar Loaf also offers miles of cross
country ski trails along Lake
Michigan. Located northwest of
Traverse City, a 4-hour drive from
Ann Arbor, Sugar Loaf offers varied
lodging. Individual lodging rates
begin at $99 for two breakfasts, one
dinner, weekend lift passes, and one
lesson.
WYOMING
* Jackson Hole - American Snow
King Hotel features 200 rooms at the
base of a skiing area with a 1,571 foot
vertical drop. Lodging and life tickets
can range from $45 for a single to
$76 for a quad. The skiing area, which
is about 15 miles from Grand Teton
National Park, has 12 runs and offers
slopes for all levels of skiers.
EUROPE
* Innsbruck - Scandinavian Air
Lines offers a package deal that in-
cludes skiiing in Innsbruck and
Copenhagen for a week. Alp-seeking
skiers can leave Chicago and travel

to Innsbruck and stay seven nights,
with breakfast daily, for $695. The
price includes excursions to five dif-
ferent ski areas offering all levels of
difficulty.
COLORADO
" Steamboat - A three hour ride from
Denver, Steamboat features a dizzy
3,600 vertical drop and 1,400 acres of
skiable terrain among the Rockies.
Six skiers can share a 2 bedroom con-

few people," Gallagher said.
Gallagher says students can book
Spring Break packages ranging from'
$99.95 to $299.00 through her
organization, Campus Travels Inter-
national.
The $99.95 option includes a space in
a hotel room for six and no transpor-
tation while the $299 package includes
a space in a hotel room for four and
bus to and from Daytona, she said.

do for as low as $95 per night, or as
high as $250 per night.
" Aspen - Aspen resort offers skiers
both the highest vertical rise in
Colorado at Aspen Highland% and the
relatively tame run Buttermilk
among its four mountain slopes. With
200 different accommodations,
packages that include lift tickets and
lodging are constructed in advance
with the reservation office.

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4 Weekend/Friday, January 17, 1986

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