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January 17, 1986 - Image 13

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-01-17
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NEW YORK

SPRNG BEAK

N.Y

. coffee shops: Windows of the city

By Kery Murakami
THERE ARE NO coffee shops in Ann Arbor.
Oh sure there are places like the Pantree and the Fleetwood,
but they're not real coffee shops. A real coffee shop, a
New Yorker's coffee shop, must have a certain atmosphere, a
certain greasy flavor and feel to it. The Pantree's too clean.
The Fleetwood has the right texture, but it fails the most im-
portant test. A real coffee shop must be open all night. You just
can't plan the revolution over lunch.
But as you sit there in your clean coffee shops that'1l close
before Letterman comes on, you're probably wondering "So
what? Ann Arbor has a lot of things to offer, and if you want to
sit around all night planning the revolution, you can do it in the
Pantree, even if it is clean."
Well, I'm a New Yorker, and coffee shops, real coffee shops,
are the quintessence of the city. If the restaurant high atop the
World Trade Center is the "Windows of the World," then the
coffee shops scattered on the island below are the windows of
the city.
That's another requirement. Coffee shops have to reflect the
neighborhood they serve. Over near where I live is the
Madison Food Shoppe, a relative clean little dive on First
Avenue and Fifty-Third street. On fifty-third and first as we
New Yorkers call it.
There isn't much of the revolution here, mainly business
establishment types sitting around reading the Times or
discussing corporate takeovers or the New York Knicks (the
two favorite topics of business establishment types.)
Once in a while, you'll also get embassy workers from the
multitude of foreign embassies that litter the area between the
coffee shop and the United Nations ten blocks away.
Other times, you'll also get the wives of the rich establish-
ment types - those over there with the fur coats and the huge
shopping bags. They've stopped off after another day's battle
with "those rude sales girls," at Bloomingdales, ten blocks
north.

But the coffee drinkers in this joint are basicaly all the same
- rich establishment types. This is midtown.
Manhattan is like a picnic. Someone's dropped a piece of
quiche on the middle of the groundcloth, and all the ants are
converging on it. The farther away you get from midtown, the
less ants you see.
The farther away you get from midtown, the less you see of
the Manhattan on "Family Affair."
But while most of Manhattan is similar, there are differen-
ces. If we take a walk from our first coffee shop to the west
side of midtown, we pass Fifth Avenue, the dividing line bet-
ween the east and west sides of the island.
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th, or uptown.
But most ostentatious here, sitting amidst the shoppers, ar-
tists, and street performers who dance, sing, and juggle -
sometimes all at the same time - at nearby Central Park, are
the tourists.
These are the ones with the cameras and the "I Love New
York" shopping bags filled with little elass oaoerweichts with
snow falling on the Statue of Liberty. They're the ones with the
New York City maps spread out like a tablecloth, talking very
loudly and very excitedly about "What are we going to see
next?" "Where's the urban blight?" and "Oh my God, is that
Dustin Hoffman over eating a burger with Al Pacino?"
And those in the next booth, drooling, are the street mer-
chants, monetary predators who roam the city searching for
tourists or naive New Yorkers looking for a bargain.
While this is the best guide to New York ever written, a live
guide won't hurt either. The dorms are filled with New
Yorkers to befriend, at least until after spring break. God
knows that's why everybody loves me.
Continuing on our little tour, we head downtown to the
southern fringes of midtown. On forty-second street and
Broadway, we hit Times Square; the home of the city's pimps,
whores, live and filmed sex acts, and of course, fine theater.
Coffee shops here are filled with a strange hodgepodge of
people in garish, glittery uniforms selling favors and people in
garish, fur costumes going to be cultured.
Further downtown lies the "Village." Once a haven for in-
novative, and revolutionary thought and culture, it is now
overrun by the "neon plague." Artists and philosophers who
once filled the coffee shops with talk of Warhol and Lenin
have been shoved to the surrounding boroughs by radical chic
yuppie and their skyrocketing rent. Rob Lowe and Gary Hart
are now the coffee shop heroes of the Village. And I bet the cof-
fee isn't as good either.
Still, Washington Square Park, with turn-of-the-century ar-
chitecture and '60s revolutionary graffiti, is still interesting.
All the city's a coffee shop, and all the men and women are
like Ann Arbor-ites who have found a greasy place to sit
around all night.

Mountains
lure many
ski fans.
By Melissa Birks
AH,SKMNG!
The thril of standing in sub-zero
temperatures with two thin fiberglass
boards strapped to your feet. The
excitement of soaring down an icy
mountain at break-neck speeds. The
romantic allure of meeting members
of the opposite sex while wiping a
drippy nose.
But this is just the tip of the iceberg
as far as the fun to be had skiing.
Michigan skiers alone will spend $140
to $150 million this year visiting the
snow-capped slopes and quiet lodges
of the state's resorts.
Following are just some of the ski
resorts that have proven popular
around Michigan, out west, and in
Europe.
See SNOW, Page 9

By Rob Earle
T<HIS year, like every year, Univer-
sity students will spread to the four
3 winds in the annual Ann Arbor
evacuation known to the University as
Mid-Winter Break and to students as
Spring Break.
The top choice is, as ever, the pina
coladas and sandy beaches of Florida.
But students will not be able to sip
those pina coladas on some Florida
4", beaches this year.
After the chaos of Spring Break
vacationers last year, both Fort
0' Lauderdale and Daytona passed
resolutions prohibiting alcohol on
beaches.
But this, and the new 21-year-old
drinking age, will not dissuade college
students' loyalty to Florida.
The traditional masses will descend
~.. ; on the Daytona area this year in sear-
ch of sun, sand, and scantily-clad
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Coffee shops: Need a greasy feel
In coffee shops here, we see a similar but different clientele.
There is, of course, the same fur coat crowd.
But there are also some of the artsy types, stopping for cof-
fee to discuss the Toulouse Lautrec exhibit or the Calder
mobiles they just saw at the Metropolitan Museum of
Art on fifty-third and fifth. Perhaps they're also resting before
going to the more traditional Metropolitan Museum of Modern
Art (MOMA) or Frank Lloyd Wright's screw-like architec-
tural masterpiece, the Guggenheim Museum, which houses
lesser works of art. Both museums are about thirty blocks nor-

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to Boston bars
d the Nines. For the disco look, college student. Or, if you like "tacky
with its top-40 tunes, revolving trendy Guido clubs where people go in
d ball, and 15-foot video screens their gold Trans Ams," said B.U.
ace to go dancing. Or so says sophomore Billy Phillips, try the Nar-
Magazine, which named it the cissus, Lipstick, or Celebrations bars
ice bar in the city in 1985. in the building nearby. But be
v wave is more your beat, hop forewarned-Narcissus was named
or to the Spit, the former punk, the worst dance bar by Boston
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to the Nines, formally known those under 21.
.ndsdowne-a warehouse con- For a more "earthy" atmosphere,
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ock from Landsdowne, in Beacon Street. "It's like a total dive.
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ice for the hard core punk truckers and street people is Thur-
sday nights when it's packed with
freshmen and sophomores," said one
B.U. student.
The place where the jet-set crowd
and fashion models hang out is
Division Sixteen on Marlborough near
Newbury Street. "It's very expensive
RAVEL and therefore very nice," said
Phillips who described it as a "young,
cool place." The bar features new
music and showcases big local bands.
Jocks shouldn't be left out. There's
a place for them as well on Newbury
Street at Daisy Buchanan's.
The one place real Boston college
students don't go is to the many out-
door cafes and bars at Faneuil Hall
Marketplace. Here, by the City Plaza
and Waterfront park, wander the
7 9young professionals and tourists who
769-90 ihaven't yet discovered the beauty of
college bars.

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10 Weekend/Friday, January 17, 1986

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