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January 08, 1986 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-01-08

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, January 8, 1986
Harvard official resigns over CIA funding

By JERRY MARKON
A Harvard University official's con-
troversial acceptance of research
funds from the CIA has led to his
resignation as director of the Center
for Middle Eastern Studies.
Prof. Nadav Safran stepped down
last week, although a university in-
vestigation found him guilty of only
procedural errors in his handling of
CIA funds for a book and a political
conference.
"This whole controversy has made
the center a controversial place . .. he.
felt the work of the center couldn't
continue if he was there," said Mar-
jorie Heffron, assistant director of
Harvard's news office.

SAFRAN, who will remain at Har-
vard as a tenured professor, could not
be reached for comment.
Although his CIA contracts - one
for researching a book on Saudi
Arabia and another that helped fund a
university conference on Islam and
politics - did not technically violate
Harvard research guidelines,
Safran's colleagues had strongly ob-
jected to the funding.
Last October, for example, seven.
faculty members associated with the
center asked Harvard to prohibit CIA
funding in sensitive areas of study
such as the Middle East where, they
said, scholars must avoid ties to the
U.S. government.

HARVARD currently prohibits
research that cannot be openly
carried out and published, but the Un-
iversity has no restrictions on CIA
funding.
Safran did violate Harvard rules,
however, when he failed to notify the
university far enough in advance of
the CIA support for the conference.
When he eventually disclosed the
source of the funding a week before
the conference, some of the par-
ticipants, including several foreign
scholars, refused to attend.
Although Michael Spence, dean of
Harvard's College of Arts and Scien-
ces, reported last week that Safran hadLI
resigned voluntarily, a Harvard source
familiar with the investigation

speculated yesterday that he may
have struck up a deal with the univer-
sity.
The deal might have entailed
Safran agreeing to resign in exchange
for the university allowing him to
remain a tenured professor, the sour-
ce said. He pointed out that Spence 's
report strongly praised Safran as a
distinguished scholar.
Safran will direct the center for the
rest of this year, and no committee
has yet been appointed to find his suc-
cessor.
The University of Michigan has not
received CIA funding for several
years, but administrators have
speculated that there may be agency
funds covertly circulating on campus.

BLUE FRONT
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(Continued from Page 1)

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with a salary of $105,000.
THE LOWEST paid executive of-
ficer, for the second year, is Henry
Johnson, the vice president for
student services, with a salary of
$70,000, up from the $63,000 that he
earned in the 1983-84 fiscal year.
Earning a higher salary than many
of the executive officers, Mark
Orringer, the section head of thoracic
surgery, added $150,000 to his coffer.
Justifying the high salaries of
medical personnel, Orringer cited the
nationwide prominence of the Univer-
sity Hospitals and the extensive
"curriculum viti" of its staff.
Dave Friedo, the University
Hospitals' coordinator for public in-
formation, said the high salaries are
necessary to compete with peer in-
stitutions, "our faculty are paid

salaries that are competitive with
salaries of physicians at other
academic medical centers around the
country," he said.'
AMONG THE University deans, the
highest paid dean in 1985 was Joseph
Johnson, the dean of the medical
school, who earned $135,000. Johnson
replaced Terrance Sandalow, the
dean of the law school, as the highest
paid dean. A 13.8 percent increase
brought Sandalow's salary to $120,000,
up from $105,952 in 1984.
Other deans who made six-digit
salaries are Gilbert Whitaker, dean of
the business administration, with a
salary of $107,158, and Richard
Christenson, dean of the School of
Dentistry, who earned $106,180.
Peter Steiner, dean of LSA, who was
the third highest paid dean in 1984
with a salary of $92,753, slipped
behind Christenson and Whitaker. He
scraped into the six-digit category
with a 1985 salary of $100,000.
In the sports arena, football coach
Bo Schembechler was the only coach
to earn more than $100,000,. With the
successful football season bringing the
Wolverines to the Fiesta Bowl,
Schembechler enjoyed a 5.2 percent
salary increase, kicking his annual
income up from $96,030 to $101,030.
Bill Frieder, coach of the Big Ten
basketball champions, trailed
Schembechler with a salary of
$75,500.

IN BRIEF
COMPILED FROM ASSOCIATED PRESS AND
UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL REPORTS
Ypsi prison guard rescued
YPSILANTI - A female prison guard held hostage at knifepoint for
more than 10 hours by an inmate was rescued unharmed last night when a
state trooper rushed the cell, authorities said.
The standoff at the Huron Valley Men's Facility ended about 7:10 p.m.
when a trooper forced open the cell where prisoner James Thomas was
holding the guard captive, said Richard McKeon, executive assistant to
the director of the state corrections department.
No one was injured, he said.
Thomas, 32, was tricked into opening the door to his cell where he was
holding guard Colleen Nickerson hostage when prison officials turned up
the heat "to make it uncomfortable" and they offered him a cold drink,
McKeon said.
"He finally agreed to have some Kool Aid ... he finally opened it up
enough for one state police officer to force open the door and get the
woman out," he said. "There were no shots and no injuries, and the
hostage is OK. Hopefully, life gets back to normal."
Thomas was "not really demanding anything" during the siege in Unit
Four of the five-unit maximum-security prison, McKeon said. "He wan-
ted more psychological services.
Congressmen denied chance.,
to hold meeting with Mandela
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - The government yesterday refused
to let a six-member U.S. congressional delegation see jailed guerrilla
leader Nelson Mandela, saying simply, "The visit will not take place."
The delegates, including four blacks, later had an unexpectedly long
three-hour meeting with Foreign Minister R.F. Botha and said they did
not regard the Mandela visit refusal as final. The decision was announced
by the Prisons Department.
"We still haven't had the final answer from the president," said Rep.
William Gray, a Philadelphia Democrat and a black. The group if to meet
President P.W. Botha today at his home in the coastal resort of George.
Foreign Minister Botha said after meeting the Americans, "I trust this
will contribute to a greater understanding between South Africa and the
U.S. Congress."
Roelof Botha, no relation to the president, is a former ambassador to
Washington who for nearly two decades has contended with the many in-
ternational critics of apartheid, South Africa's system of legal racial
segregation.
Philly arsonists charged with
violating civil rights of family
PHILADELPHIA - Four white men were charged yesterday with
civil rights violations for allegedly torching the home of a black family
targeted for racial protest in a predominatly white neighborhood.
Charles Williams, Marietta Bloxom, and the couple's 7-year-old
daughter already had moved out of the southwest Philadelphia neigh-
borhood to live with relatives before the Dec. 12 blaze, but their
possessions remained in the house and were destroyed.
Some 400 whites several weeks earlier swarmed in front of the house,
chanting "Beat it!" and "We want them out!" That and another incident
prompted Mayor Goode to declare a state of emergency in the neigh-
borhood Nov. 22 and ban gatherings of four or more people within a 70-
block area.
If convicted, the four each could face up to 10 years in prison and a
$10,000 fine.
New postmaster takes over

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BIRTH DEFECTS FOUNDATION

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WASHINGTON - Albert Casey took over as postmaster general
promising to strengthen the ability of the U.S. Postal Service to compete
by introducing airline-style marketing techniques.
The former American Airlines president told reporters "the post office
is selling services to the public ... the post office is involved with all for-
ms of competition today. These are very similar principlies to what we've
just been through with airline deregulation."
At American, a press release said, Casey "successfully turned the
company's 1974 losses of $49 million into a profit of $228 million in 1984. .
through skilled financial management and executive selection."
Casey joked that he might figure a way to give mailers something
similar to the frequent flier bonuses airlines offer top customers.
He pledged to develop ways for the $30-billion-a-year agency to com-
pete with overnight delivery circulars that also could be delivered by
mail.
Asked how long he planned to serve, Casey, who celebrates his 66th bir-
thday next month, said "the primary goal of any chief executive is to';
arrange for his successor. . . . If I'm really good, six months, if I'm poor
nine months."
Gun battles erupted in Kabul
NEW DELHI, India - Gun battles apparently between rival Afghan
communist party factions erupted last week in the presidential palace in
the Afghan capital of Kabul, Western diplomats. said yesterday.
Diplomats said other battles were also reported at the same time out-
side the nearby West German Embassy and in a neighborhood where
many Soviet diplomats were housed.
It was the second time in five months that gunbattles were reported in
the presidential palace.
"Most sources strongly suspect that - as was the case in the mid-
September palace shootout - this had to do with factional squabbles," one
diplomat said at a scheduled weekly briefing for Western reporters.
In another development, Afghanistan accused neighboring Pakistan of
increasing military support for Moslem rebels in their six-year war to
overthrow the Soviet-backed Kabul government.
01JiJe LIffcigUU lutalig
Vol. XCVI- No.69
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the Fall and Winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April - $18.00 in Ann Arbor; $35.00 outside the city. One term -
$10.00 in town; $20.00 out of town.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and Sub-
scribes to United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles
Times Syndicate, and College Press Service.

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It's more than just talk. At ROLM, your career is always a
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physical surroundings and benefits befitting that kind of quality.
After the hard work you've put into preparing for your career,
ROLM wouldn't think of offering you any less.

Electrical Engineering &
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Come talk about the opportunities at ROLM.
Sign up with your Placement Office for an on-
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Anderson. Ennineerina Recruitment. M/S 372,

Editor in Chief.................NEIL CHASE
Opinion Page Editors........JODY BECKER
JOSEPH KRAUS
Managing Editors .......GEORGEA KOVANIS
JACKIE YOUNG
News Editor............THOMASMILLER
Features Editor .......... LAURIE DELATER
City Editor ............... ANDREW ERIKSEN
Personnel Editor..........TRACEY MILLER
NEWS STAFF: Eve Becker, Melissa Birks, Laura
Bischoff, Rebecca Blumenstein, Joanne Cannella,
Philip Chidel, Dov Cohen. Kysa Connett, Tim
Daly, Nancy Driscoll, Rob Earle. Rachel Gottlieb,
Stephen Gregory, Linda Holler, Mary Chris
Jakelevic, Vibeke Laroi, Michael Lustig, Jerry
Markon, Eric Mattson, Amy Mindell, Kery Mura-
kami, Jill Oserowsky, Christy Riedel, Michael Sher-.
man, Jennifer Smith, Jeff Widran, Cheryl Wistrom.
Associate Opinion Page Editor . . KAREN KLEIN
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Gayle Kirshenbaum,
Da.., ..is .n.nr. Park.Ptr MoonevS..aSsnne

Chief Photographer............DAN HABIB
PHOTO STAFF: Jae Kim, Scott Lituchy. John
Munson, Matt Petrie, Dean Randazzo, Andi
Schreiber, Darrian Smith.
Sports Editor...............TOM KEANEY
Associate Sports Editors . JOE EWING
BARB McQUADE, ADAM MARTIN,
PHIL NUSSEL, STEVE WISE
SPORTS STAFF: Dave Aretha. Mark Borowskv.
Debbie deFrances, Liam Flaherty, Steve Green-
baum, Rachel Goldman, Jon Hartmann, Darren
Jasey, Phil Johnson, Rick Kaplan, Christian Mar-
tin, Scott Miller, Greg Molzon, Brad Morgan,
Jerry Muth, Adam Ochlis, Chris Parker, Mike
Redstone, Duane Roose, Jeff Rush, Scott Shaffer,
Pete Steinert, Douglas Volan.
Business Manager ........ DAWN WILLACKER
Sales Manager........MARY ANNE HOGAN
Assistant Sales Manager ........... YUNA LEE
Marketing Manager .........CYNTHIA NIXON
Finance Manager..........DAVID JELINEK
Classified Manager ...GAYLA BROCKMAN

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