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February 10, 1986 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-02-10

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4

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily, Monday, February 10, 1986

MSA official resigns after speaking to media

(Continued from Page 1)
MSA employee Jennifer Faigel,
who chaired the assembly's Women's
Issues Committee last year, agreed
that Bullard did not always perform
her job effectively, and she stressed
that Bullard's resignation may have
been triggered by a series of conflicts
between her and MSA leaders.
"THERE were times when she was
just sort of sitting around and an-
swering the phone," said Faigel, who

added that Bullard still represented a
valuable resource because of her con-
nections inside the University.
But Richard Layman, an executive
assistant to Josephson, said MSA's
handling of Bullard and Norris was an
attempt to hide its disunity and
poorly-organized leadership struc-
ture.
"MSA is like the administration in a
lot of ways. We don't want people to

know our dirt," Layman said. "This
whole sordid issue shows a very con-
voluted, confused decision-making
organization."
"I DON'T think Phil (Cole) has the
right to prohibit Bullard to speak,"
Layman said. "This is a great exam-
ple of the garbage can theory of
organization."
Belcher added that "sometimes
MSA tried to present an image of
unity to the Univerity community

which doesn't always exist."
"A lot of the disunity that doesn't
come out realtes to personality con-
flicts," Belcher said, citing
disagreeements between Norris and
other assembly members.
Daily staff writer Rebecca
Blumenstein filed a report for this
story.

Judge calls for new trial for CIA demonstrators

(Continued from Page 1)
was conducting job interviews.
Protesters planned to display quietly
their opposition to the CIA.
After a noon rally on the Diag,
protesters returned to resume their
vigil. They found the office closed to
them, but not to interviewees and of-
fice personnel.
Soon afterwards Deborah Orr May,
director of the office, read the

protesters a notice that they would be
arrested for trespassing if they did not
leave the building. Prosecuting attor-
ney Bob Cooper said Friday that May
only read the notice after she
recognized the approximately 50
demonstrators outside the office were
not "as quiet and peaceful as they
represent themselves to be." Cooper
added that both May and the Ann AR-
bor police were reluctant to make

arrests.
But the protestors maintain that
lack of access to the office and the
arrest of Buchen earlier in the day
sparked the louder chanting.
The trespassing notice includes a
warning that future entry into any
University-owned or leased building
would subject them to arrest. Defen-
dants maintain that because they
were students, faculty, or taxpayers,

they had a right to be in the Student
Activies Building.
Cooper said that once a trespass
notice is given by the appropriate
agent of the property the defendants
have no lawful authority to stay there.
Green explained her decision to
stay after hearing the notice: "(May)
couldn't tell me to leave a University
building and never to enter another
University building, so I stayed."

BUSINESS

'U' business school r

By EVE BECKER
Nearly one-third of top U.S.
business executive with college
degrees have graduated from Big
Ten and Ivy League Universities, ac-
cording to a recent study published in
the Chronicle of Higher Education.
The study, which surveyed 70,000
company presidents, vice presidents,
and directors, shows that the Univer-
sity's business school ranks eighth in
the number of undergraduate degrees
and fifth in the number of graduate
degrees granted to business leaders.
Yale University leads the un-
dergraduate category, while Harvard

University leads the graduate
category.
BUSINESS school administrators,
students, and placement officers at-
tribute the success of University
graduates to the well-rounded
program and the high calibre of
students the business program at-
tracts.
"We attract the kind of students the
companies want, real top students,"
said Peggy Carroll, director of the
business school's placement office.
Competition to get into the business
school is stiff. Six people apply for
every one space in the MBA program,

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and the majority of MBA students
have had some work experience
before enrolling.
THE WALL Street Journal ranks
the University's MBA program sixth
in the country, while Money Magazine
ranks it in the top nine.
The program's reputation attracts
leading companies to campus
placement officials say. The
placement office schedules as many
as 13,000 campus interviews yearly
with businesses such as IBM and the
First Chicago Bank.
A business degree from the Univer-.
sity has launched many successful
careers. For example, Roger Smith,
chairman of General Motors, Roger
Fridholm, president of the Stroh's
brewery company, and Phil Smith,
president of General Foods, all ear-
ned business degrees at the Univer-
sity.
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Whitaker also credits the quality of
students for the business school's
success.
"The University gets very strong
students. They are able people," he
said. "Able people are going to do
well."
Because employers seek out job
candidates with thorough training
and a strong work ethic, the business
school is a good source of potential
executives, he said.
"WE HAVE the kind of curriculum
that turns out people for general
management. It's well-rounded, and
that's what's important in terms of
moving people up the executive
ranks," Whitaker explained.
Carroll said University business
graduates are in high demand, with
the average student receiving three
job offerings upon graduation.
Glen Anderson, supervisor of
organization and administration for
the central finance office at the Ford
Motor Company, said he recruits at 38
colleges in the nation to fill spots for
all of the company's finance depar-
tm ents.
HE SAID the University is among
his recruitment stops because it has
"a good balance of programs within
different areas."
Anderson says he looks for students
who are "team players, motivated,
with good communication skills, both
written and oral, and students who
want to operate in an organization
such as ours."
"We find that pretty characteristic
of Michigan," he said.
Dave Crittenden, a second-year
MBA student who received his
bachelor's degree in business from
the University, said that a University
degree has "opened up a lot of oppor-
tunities for me."
"THE PROGRAM'S very rigorous.
You're getting a good grounding in
basic business backgronnd," he said.
He added that the school strikes a
balance between the different aspects
of business - Specific causes and
theory.
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IN BRIEF
COMPILED FROM ASSOCIATED PRESS AND
UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL REPORTS
Election tabulators walk out
MANILA, Philippines - Government computer operators tabulating
results in the chaotic Philippine presidential election charged yesterday
that vote totals were being manipulated and walked off the job, halting
the vote count.
A member of a U.S. team of observers appointed by President Reagan
called the operators' charges "stunning" and said he did not see how a
winner could be declared under the circumstances.
More than two days after the polls closed, President Ferdinand Marcos
and challenger Corazon Aquino remained locked in a neck-and-neck bat-
tle, each ahead in one key unofficial count.
An international group of election observers said its investigation
showed the presidential race was rife with fraud and cheating.
"We are scared and we don't know what to do next," said one of the 29
computer operators after walking out of the government Commission on
Elections, known as Comelec, with less than 30 percent of the estimated
22 million votes tabulated.
Army arrests secret police
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - The army began rounding up members of
former President-for-Life Jean-Claude Duvalier's secret police yester-
day and government and religious leaders appealed for an end to the
violence that has wracked the country since Duvalier fled last week.
In an attempt to quell the unrest, the government imposed a 2 p.m. to 6
a.m. curfew for a third day in Port-au-Prince, the capital, and canceled
annual Mardi Gras celebrations that were scheduled to begin Sunday.
No official casualty figures have been released. But morgue officials
told a Canadian journalist yesterday that at least 300 people have been
killed in the Port-au-Prince area since Duvalier left the country early
Friday.
The victims were shot or beaten or died in traffic accidents. At least 10
were members of the Tontons Macoutes, the feared militia formed by
Duvalier's father, Francois, after he assumed power 28 years ago, of-
ficials said.
Crews search train wreckage
HINTON, Alberta - Work crews yesterday pulled the first bodies from
the twisted wreckage of two trains that collided head-on after a freight
failed to allow a passenger train to pass. At least 29 people were killed.
The accident occurred at 10:40 a.m. EST, 10 milest east of Hinton, a
pulp-mill town on the main Canadian National railroad line, said Bill
Dewan, a spokesman for the principal cross-country freight line. The
freight train, with 114 cars and three diesel locomotives, was west-bound,
he said, and the 9-car passenger train was heading east.
Estimates of the number of passengers ranged from 101 to 120. Of the 24
crew members on both trains, seven were missing, said Dewan.
He said the accident occurred on a slight curve after the freight train
entered a single track from a double track. The trains collided about 75
yards from where the section of double track ended.
"The train should not have left the double tract section, and whether its
failure to stop was due to signal failure or human failure is what is under
investigation," he said.
Soviets ready for spy swap
BERLIN - Soviet dissident Anatoly Shcharansky, the best-known
figure in a major East-West prisoner swap expected this week, will be
moved to East Berlin today in preparation for the exchange, a newspaper
reported yesterday.
The West Germany newspaper Bild also quoted Soviet sources as
saying Shcharansky's mother, Ida Milgrom, 77, might be allowed to leave
the Soviet Union at a later date.
"The timing has not been fixed and she will not in any circumstances be
part of a trade with other people," Bild quoted the sources as saying.
The Bild report came as West German officials confirmed the Soviets
had released three West Germans arrested on corruption charges.
The three - Bodo Luetke, Pavel Arsene and Monika Schanzenbach,
who flew to West Germany Saturday - were arrested last year during
Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev's crackdown on corruption, Schanzen-
bach was sentenced to seven years in jail for bribery, and the two men
were awaiting trial on similar charges.
NASA may have know of
problems before fatal launch
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Navy divers searched the ocean floor
yesterday for wreckage from the exploded shuttle Challenger amid
charges NASA knew of possibly "catastrophic" problems with shuttle
rocket boosters before the fatal launch.
The shell-shocked space agency refused to comment on the report as its
investigation into the tragedy continued under a thick cloud of secrecy.
But officials privately acknowledged awareness of problems with seals
between booster rocket fuel segments on many past flights.
The New York Times reported yesterday that agency documents.
showed top shutle managers knew of potentially dangerous problems
with seals around shuttle booster rocket fuel segments last year and that
internal memos were circulated as late as December listing concern
about possible failures.

Jesse Moore, associate administrator for spaceflight and chief of the'
shuttle program, last answered questions from reporters on Jan. 29, the
day after history's worst space disaster. Since then, he and other
program managers have been inaccessible.
The Challenger disaster appears to have been triggered by a rupture at
or near a seal joining the lower two of fqur solid propellant fuel segments
in the ship's right side booster rocket.
The escaping flame apparently heated Challenger's giant external fuel
tank enough to raise internal pressure to the rupture point, setting off a
titanic explosion that blew the shuttle apart and killed its seven-member
crew.
0hije Sirljtganpt BaIl
Vol XCVI - No. 92
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the fall and winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April-$18 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the city. One term-$10 in
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Tuesday., Feb. 11

1035 Angell Hall

4:10 to 5:30 p.m.

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THIS WEEK AT GUILD HOUSE
802 MON ROE
A ANN ARBOR, MI 48104
GUILD HOUSE
WRITERS SERIES
Monday, February 10 8:00 p.r

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READING FROM THEIR WORKS
*Cosponsored by the Michigan Student Assembly
FOR MORE INFO CALL 662-5189

February 14 Noon Forum
"The Meaning of Work
in a High Tech Era"
JANE MYERS
Public Relations Consultant

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6-8 p.m.

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Proceeds for material aid to
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524
LSA Building
764.9216

Syndicate, and College Press Service.
Editor in Chief............ERIC MATTSON
Managing Editor.......RACHEL GOTTLIEB
News Editor............... JERRY MARKON
Features Editor............CHRISTY RIEDEL
NEWS STAFF: Eve Becker, Melissa Birks, Laura
Bischoff, Rebecca Blumenstein, Marc Carrel, Dov
Cohen. Laura Coughlin, Tim Daly, Nancy
Driscoll, Rob Earle. Amy Goldstein, Susan Grant.
Stephen Gregory, Steve Herz, Linda Holler, Mary
Chris Jaklevic, Philip Levy, Michael Lustig, Amy
Mindell, Caroline Muller, Kery Murakami, Jill
Oserowsky, Joe Pigott, Kurt Serbus, Martha Sevet
son, Cheryl Wistrom, Jackie Young.
Opinion Page Editor.........KAREN KLEIN
Associate Opinion Page Editor ... HENRY PARK
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Gayle Kirshenbaum,
Peter Ephross, David Lewis, Peter Mooney,
Susanne Skubik.

Sports Editor ............... BARB McQUADE
Associate Sports Editors ......DAVE ARETHA,
MARK BOROWSKY, RICK KAPLAN,
ADAM MARTIN, PHIL NUSSEL.
SPORTS STAFF: Emily Bridgham, Debbie
deFrances, Liam Flaherty, Jon Hartmann, Darren
Jasey, Christian Martin, Scott Miller, Greg
Molzon, Jerry Muth, Adam Ochlis, Duane Roose,
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Steinert, Douglas Volan.
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Classified Manager.....GAYLA BROCKMAN
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Marketing Manager .......... JAKE GAGNON

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