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February 10, 1986 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE LIST
What's happening around Ann Arbor

The Michigan Daily, Monday, February 10, 1986 - Page 3
Tenants Union asks Swisher to resign

Campus Cinema
MONDAY
Last Grave at Dimbaza (Nancy
Mahomo, 1974) Alt/Act, 7:30 p.m.,
MLB3.
This documentary about the
devastating human costs of the
South African apartheid system is
still considered the best in-
vestigation of this problem.
You Have Struck a Rock (Deborah
May, 1981) Alt Act, 8:30 p.m. MLB 3.
"You have touched a woman, you
have struck a rock" became the
slogan of the anti-pass campaigns in
the 1950's. In this film, black South
African women tell of the mass
mobilization of opposition to apar-
theid when the South African regime
tried to extend the pass laws to
women.
WEDNESDAY
Cries and Whispers (Ingmar
Bergman, 1972) CG, 9:30 p.m., MLB
3.
A young woman, slowly dying
from cancer is haunted by memories
of her past and with the help of her
devoted maid and two sisters tries to
hide herself away from the harsh
realities of the outside world.
Starring Liv Ullman. Won best film
award from New York critics.
Swedish with subtitles.
Bonnie and Clyde (Arthur Penn,
1967) Hill St., 8 p.m., Hill St.
Warren Beatty and Faye
Dunaway star in this film about the
relationship of four bank robbers
who achieve fortune, fame and the
ultimate doom. Received
nomination for Oscar.
THURSDAY
Mississippi Triangle (C. Choy, W.
Long, A. Siegel) Alt Act, 7 and 9
p.m., Nat. Sci.
In the 1960's Chinese immigrants
were brought to the Mississippi
Delta to replace freed black slaves
on cotton plantations. This film ex-
plores the relationship which has
developed during the past 100 years
between Whites, Blacks, and Chiese
in this region.
American Werewolf in London
(John Landis, 1981) MED, 7:30 and
9:20p.m., MLB4,
On a hike through a pitch black
England countryside (full moon
shining, of course) a student gets at-
tacked and bitten by a werewolf and
thus becomes one himself. A film
filled with a good mixture of
macabre and off-beat humor.
Birth of a Nation (G. W. Griffith,
1915) AAFC, 7:30 p.m., Aud. A.
One of the classics of American
film. This silent epic, which has been
banned more times than any other
film in history, is about post-Civil
War south. A complete version with
a musical soundtrack.
N Performances
Writers' Series-Guild House, 8
p.m., Guild House (662-5189).
Ann Arborite Cynthia King reads
from her fiction and Macomb Com-
munity College English teacher
Lawrence Pike reads from his books
of poems.
Chamber Choir-University School
of Music, 8 p.m., Hill Auditorium
(763-4726).
Thomas Hilbish conducts this
University music student ensemble

in a program which includes the
works of Haydn, Beethoven, and
Mozart.

* Bars and Clubs
The Ark-(761-1415) - Saline Big
Band, swing.
Bird of Paradise - (662-8310) -
Paul Vornhagen & Friends, Latyin
swing-jazz.
The Blind Pig - (996-8555) - Ad-
ventures, all-instrumental rock 'n'
roll.
The Earle - (994-02111) - Larry
Manderville, solo piano.
Mr. Flood's Party - (995-2132) -
Private Sector, dance-oriented
R&B.
The Nectarine Ballroom - (994-
5436) - New music, with DJ Roger
LeLievre.
Rick's American Cafe - (996-
2747) - Los Chickens, R&B, blues,
and rock.
Speakers
Dan Nocera - "Chemical Reac-
tivity of Electronically Excited
Transition Metal Complexes,"
Chemistry, 4 p.m., room 1200,
Chemistry Bldg.
Henry Wright - "The Develop-
ment of Islam on the Comoro Islan-
ds," Near East and North African
Studies, noon, Commons Room,
Lane Hall.
Nancy Gross - "Visitor
Relations," HRD, 8:30a.m.
Meetings
Multiple Sclerosis Society -
Counseling group; Significant
Others Group, 7 p.m., Washtenaw
United Way.
LSA faculty - 4:10 p.m., MLB 4.
Tae Kwon Do Club - practice, 6
p.m., room 2275, CCRB.
Society for Creative Anachronism
- 7 p.m., East Quad.
Furthermore
Movie Poster sale - Arts and
Programming, 10 a.m., ground
floor, Union.
. Thinking and Writing on Art -
Michigan Guild of Artists and Ar-
tisans, 7:30 p.m., basement, Union.
From Rough Draft to Final:
Polishing Your Resume to Perfec-
tion - Career Planning &
Placement program, 4:10 p.m.
Presenting Yourself to the Em-
ployer - Career Planning &
Placement program, 4:10 p.m.
How Shall We Then Live? - Fran-
ces Schaeffer Film Series, 7:30 p.m.,
Aud. C, Angell Hall.
Discussion with Don Hunt -
University Communicators Forum,
3:45 p.m., room 2553, LSA Bldg.
Tutoring in science, math, and
engineering - Tau Beta Pi, 8 p.m.,
room 307, UGLi.
Basic Concepts of Database
Management - Micromcomputer
Education Center workshop, 8:30
a.m.
Basic Concepts of International
Microcomputer Communications -
Microcomputer Education Center
workshop, 3 p.m., room 3001, SEB.
Macintosh Disk & File
Management - Microcomputer
Education Center Workshop, 3 p.m.,
room 3001, SEB.
On-Line Transcations - HRD
workshop, 8:15 p.m., 10:15 a.m.,
room 1050, Ad. Svcs.
Square Dance lessons - A-
Squares, 7 p.m., Union.
Bible Study - Wesley Foundation,
6 p.m., 602 E. Huron.
Black History Film Series -
Alternative Action/Cross Cultural
Arts Exchange, 7:30 p.m., MLB 3.

By MELISSA BIRKS
The Ann Arbor Tenants Union sent a letter
Friday to a long-time member of the City's
Housing Board of Appeals asking him to resign his
post.
In the letter to John Swisher, Tenants Union
Director Jeff Ditz cited three reasons for
requesting the resignation, including violations of
his term in service, the fact that he is not a
registered voter in Ann Arbor, and his "ar-
bitrary" political views on the board.
"HE'S BEEN on the board since 1973, and the
City Charter says six years maximum," Ditz said.
"Also, he's not a registered voter; he changed his
residence to Dexter County from Ann Arbor. He
spent 12 years helping landlords to weaken the
law."
Ditz said in his letter: "Your powers . . . are
constrained by your duty to achieve the intent of

the Housing Code, which is to secure the health,
safety and general welfare of tenants. In doing
these things the Board is called upon to either
weaken (vary) the law or to enforce it (correct
errors in this case)."
Swisher said he does not intend to respond to
the Tenants Union's allegations, and will not
resign.
"I HAD considered resigning because of other
time commitments," he sasid, "but because of
their treatment, I think I'll just stay right where I
am."
"The Housing Board of Appeals is the only
board whose terms are indefinite," Swisher ad-
ded.
As for the charge of a violation of residency,
Swisher said, "I did (live in Ann Arbor) when I
was originally appointed, then I moved. I've never
hidden that."

ACCORDING to Ditz, Swisher made a
"dramatic, idle threat" to resign on Feb. 4 during
a meeting of the Housing Board of Appeals.
Ditz and Tenants Union member Julia Goode .
had attended the meeting to ask the board to hear
an "appeal to correct errors" in March regarding
a rental house at 708 E. Kingsley.
The house violates several housing codes mainly
because almost five of its 16 units are illegal in
size, according to Ditz.
s"HE SAID he would resign if the board heard
our appeal in March," Ditz said. "His refusal to
hear the appeal is denying tenants due process."
Swisher, who agrees that the house is unsafe,
said the Tenants Union appeal was "political."
"The owners came to appeal for an extension of
time to get work done. We turned it down,"
Swisher said. "We've heard the appeal. There's no
reason to hear it again."

Maya Angelou pays tribute to America's blacks

- (Cgntinued from Page 1)
Angelou, the author of "I Know Why
the Caged Bird Sings" and several
volumes of poetry, read a piece called
"The Slave Auction," which under-
scored a major point in her address:
That black Americans today owe
much to the trials and tributions of

their ancestors. "We have lived .. .
with some passion, some compassion,
some humor, and some style . . .
because we have been paid for. That
now, to me is love, incredible love."
Speaking with pride, Angelou said
"The first black slave ship landed in
America in 1619 and - no offense to

my white brothers and sisters -
that's one year before the Mayflower
landed. That was so bizarre that it
could not be filmed or included in Mr.
Haley's Roots."
ANGELOU said young blacks
today lack suitable role models, and
highlighted the fact that many
television shows featuring black
characters are written by whites
"who have never met a black person

in their lives, save maybe a black per-
son who worked for them in their
house.
"I've been black a long time and all
that time that I was black I've never
seen a black person lose it before like
when I saw one say 'Dy-no-mite!'
Young blacks see that on TV and say,
'So that's what black is.' Well ... no,
that's white," Angelou said.

LONDON
INTERNSHIPS

a

* Art/Architecture
- Business/Economics
" Journalism/Mass Communications
*Politics

LDoily Photo by JAE KIM
Author Maya Angelou delivers a keynote address Saturday night at Rackham
Auditorium in honor of Black History Month.
IN SEARCH OAF
T- Shirt Salesman
Sophomore or Junior; Sales and Marketing of custom printed t-shirts,
sweaters, etc. to groups on cam pus. 10% commission. Keep any present
jobs. Full program - has worked on other campuses for 5 years. Only one
person will be chosen. Immediately call (513) 271-5334 and ask for Jim
or Gail, or write: Shirt Scene, 5835 Bramble Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio 45227.
Include campus & home phone. Thanks!!!

Semester programs include 16 credits,
9-week internship, apartments, British faculty.
All programs offered Fall and Spring; Politics and
Journalism/Mass Communications also offered Summer.

BOSTON UNIVERSITY

NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
CI Art/Architecture
C 7 Business/Economics

PHONE
_________( )
_ STATE ZIP
L Journalism/Mass Communications 18
Q Politics

Summer '86 Fall'86 Spring '87 Summer '87
Return To: London Internships, 143 Bay State Rd., Boston, MA 02215 (617) 353-9888.

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