100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 24, 1986 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-01-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 24, 1986

A2 to vote on Central America

By JOSEPH PIGOTT
Ann Arbor voters will decide on April 6
whether to support a referendum calling for an
end to U.S. intervention in Central America.
If passed, the referendum would also call for
the creation of a league of sister cities in Latin
America.
The Coalition for Peace in Central America, a
local group which was formed specifically to get
the referendum on the ballot, submitted a
petition with 5,900 signatures to the city clerk on
Jan. 6.
Benita Kaimowitz, a coordinator of the
coalition, said the proposition was adapted from
the text of an ordinance passed in Seattle.
"We're way behind what other cities are doing,"
she said.
Kaimowitz and a friend came up with the idea
for a referendum when they were talking about
finding a sister city for Ann Arbor in Nicaragua

"We called people from different organizations
to get their input and ideas, and it eventually
developed into our referendum," she said.
The group decided to pursue the idea by collec-
ting signatures instead of going directly to the
Ann Arbor City Council in order to show coun-
cilmembers that there is support for the idea.
The council has been criticized for discussing in-
ternational issues by people who feel it should
stick exclusively to local concerns.
"The direct approach makes the Ann Arbor
News and the council resistant to mixing in in-
ternational affairs. This way, however, we get a
chance to mix with people and make them aware
of the issues," Kaimowitz said.
Councilmember Gerald Jernigan (R-Fourth
Ward), who has opposed discussing international
issues at council meetings, declined to comment
on what he thought of the referendum. He said,
however, that "it doesn't bother me at all that it

is on the ballot."
Councilmember Jeff Epton (D-Third Ward)
said he enthusiastically supports the referen-
dum, and predicted that it will pass by a "sizable
margin."
Kaimowitz said she feels the referendum will
probably pass because of the large number of
people in Ann Arbor who oppose U.S. policy in
Central America. "There are a lot of people in
Ann Arbor who have been to Central America,
and they have shared their ideas with others
around," she said.
The largest obstacle the referendum faces is
the traditionally low voter turnout in April,
Kaimowitz said.
"Our underlying goal is to raise the level of in-
formation and awareness of Central America in
Ann Arbor, and through the petition drive, we
have already done this," she said.

Miranda Rule debated in law schoolforum

t
l
t
i
1
c

(Continued from Page 1) police officer failed to inform the
GRANO said he objects to Supreme suspect of his right to have a lawyer
Court Justices John Stevens, present during questioning-one of
Thurgood Marshall, and William the Miranda Rule provisions.
Brennan "playing formalistic, Procedural mistakes that may
legalistic, black-letter games." He allow suspected criminals' con-
opposed the justices' willingness to fessions to be disregarded shouldn't
dismiss evidence obtained from a be cited as a flaw in the law, Kamisar
murder suspect in a confession simply said.
becauseofaproceduralerror. "AFTER 20 years of walking.
Grano cited the three justices' around with these cards (with the
dissenting opinion in a California Miranda rights written on them), I'm
case. They wrote that a murder concerned if the police can't read
suspect's confession should not be these cards right," Kamisar said. "I
allowed as evidence because the can be sympathetic to police officers
-- -- y-- - -"- -V--- - - --
" r
O e IIaa~inn

i

mzsrlyu cliilj

COOkie witn hot chocolate.
COOKIE & HOT CHOCOLATE 99"
WITH THIS COUPON
OPEN DAILY OFFER EXPIRES
. TIL -... .-PM...,-MARCH 1,1986

i
I
I
I

in a lot of contexts, but not when they
revise the wording."
"The evil is that he's being required
to incriminate himself. The evil is
you're misrepresenting the law. You
exploit the guy's ignorance,''
Kamisar continued.
Grano termed the Miranda Rule a
"prophylactic rule" that he said the
courts have consistently ruled can be
violated without violating the Con-
stitution. He said he feared the
Supreme Court was exercising un-
checked power over the states.
"WHERE does it (the Supreme
Court) get off telling states they must
reverse convictions?" Grano said.
"No matter how you feel about
Miranda, you should be bothered by
that."
Kamisar said Justice William
Rehnquist has "taken Miranda out of
context" in believing that it can be
violated without doing damage to the
Constitution.
"I don't believe there is an official
right to silence... the Constitution says
T-SHIRT
PRINTING
TEAM AND ORGANIZATION SHIRTS
RUSH JOBS WELCOME
MULTI-COLOR OUR SPECIALTY
SURPLUS AND "OOPS" SHIRTS 3/$550
SUPERIOR QUALITY SINCE 1973
206 S. F IRST
994-1367

KALUVA RESTAURANT
FINE SOUTH INDIAN CUISINE
Specializing in Vegeterian Foods:
chapati, poori, idli sambrar, dosa and
many other varieties.

M-F 11:30a.m. -2:30p.m.
5:00-8:00p.m.
Sa. 12-9 p.m.

761-8280
3001 S. STATE STREET
(former/y To wers Restaurant
in olvermne Totwer)

that no person should be compelled
(to testify against himself)," Grano
said. "There is no privilege against
self-discrimination.'"
GRANO said a non-pressured
question that "maybe even uses some
trickery" but doesn't wear the
suspect down for 36 hours is "very
much in the societal interest."
"What I want to allow is in-
terrogation. I don't find that offen-
sive," he said. "The mere effort to
change the person's mind doesn't
bother me."
"I don't think the goal is to let
people have a sporting chance once
they've been suspected of a crime,'
Grano said.
BUT KAMISAR disagreed
vehemently. "The public has been
conned," said Kamisar. "They're
beating the crap out of these guys
(criminal suspects being
questioned)... and all these years
they've been saying, 'We're just in-
terviewing."'
"You can't get away from the real
world and how this thing is being ad-
ministered. What's going to happen if
we get away from this rule?"
Kamisar asked. "There's just not
going to be any protection.
"I AGREE that there's no right to
silence, but police have no right to
make you answer," Kamisar said.
"The suspect is bargaining with a
cop for a plea. But the suspect doesn't
know what he's doing. The cop is
telling the suspect what the law is,"
Kamisar said.
ATTENTION
STUDENTS
SAVE 20%
On all
Michigan Daily
Classified Ads
with Student I.D.
. FIND A ROOMMATE
" SELL UNWANTED
ITEMS
" ANNOUNCE PARTIES
" BUY OR SELL TICKETS
Place your ad Monday-Friday from 9a.m.-
5 p.m. at The Michigan Daily office,
420 Maynard, or Wednesdays at the Fish-
bowl.
Rent a Car
from
Econo-Car
W eaWV rent to
19 YR. OLD
STUDENTSI
Choose from small
economical cars to
vans.
Special

WEEKEND
rates
Pick up services
upon request

IN BRIEF
COMPILED FROM ASSOCIATED PRESS AND
UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL REPORTS
U.S. ships sent toward Libya
WASHINGTON-n a show of resolve, the United States has or ered its
two aircraft battle groups in the Mediterranean Sea southward toward
Libya and notified civilian air traffic officials there that the carriers wil
conduct flight operations over the next week.
Pentagon sources said yesterday that the moves in no way presaged
any type of military attack on Libya and that operations would be conduc-
ted in international airspace and waters.
One official added, however, that the exercise was intended to demon-
strate that the United States would not be intimidated by increased Soviet
naval presence in the region nor by Libyan leader Col. Moammar
Khadafy's decision to place his own military forces on alert and to pledge
continuing support for Palestinian terrorists.
"It's asserting the right to passage in international airspace, with plen-
ty of notice to everyone in advance of our peaceful intent," one source
said.
The United States has accused Libya of supporting a Palestinian
terrorist group suspected of mounting the Dec. 27 attacks on the Rome
and Vienna airports, in which 19 people died. Khadafy responded during
the first week of January by putting his military forces on alert, claiming
the United States was planning an invasion.
Govt. moves to ban asbestos
WASHINGTON - The government moved yesterday for the first time to
ban deadly asbestos, a widely-used substance that officials say causes up.
to 12,000 cancer cases annually in the United States.
Under a two-phased attack, the Environmental Protection Agency
proposed an "immediate" ban in five product categories, mostly in the
construction area. Over the next decade, EPA said, it wants to cleanse
the environment of all products containing the known carcinogen.
The decision, attacked by an industry group as "unwarranted,"
culminated more than six year of regulatory soul-searching within the
government and months of infighting between EPA and the Office of
Management and Budget.
EPA Administrator Lee Thomas said human health - not monetary
cost - was EPA's foremost concern.
Thomas said it would take about a year for the agency to complete
public hearings and administrative review of the proposed asbestos rule,
which has been in the works since late 1979.
The initial ban would affect five product categories that now contain
from one-third to one-half of the approximately 300,000 metric tons of
asbestos used by U.S. manufacturers each year.
Police stop sters' roadblock
AUSTIN, Minn. - Striking meatpackers attempt to stop non-union
workers from entering the Geo. A. Hormel & Co. plant yesterday was th-
warted when.police bashed windows and yanked strikers from their cars;
abruptly halting an auto blockade. Eight strikers were arrested.
Officers smashed the windows of two strikers' cars, pulled the drivers
out and handcuffed them when they locked themselves in their vehicles.
Six others surrendered without incident as police stopped the effort to
block the highway ramp leading to the plant.
The police also impounded four cars and reportedly drove two cars into
ditches. National Guard troops at the plant entrance were not involved in
the confrontation.
About 25 cars stopped on the ramp attempting to block non-union
workers who were arriving for work at the plant's north gate but police
cleared the roadway within half an hour. No injuries were reported,
police said.
Warriors clash in S. Africa
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Tribal warriors with spears and
clubs clashed yesterday in the Umbumbulu hills of Eastern South Africa,
leaving at least 30 dead and scores wounded on the battlefield.
Riot police units sent in to separate the fighters fired tear gas and
shotguns to disperse battling members of the Zulu and Pondo tribes.
Truckloads of weapons, mainly spears and clubs, were confiscated and
about 500 Pondos arrested, police said.
Umbumbulu is a predominantly Zulu tribal area about 30 miles southwest
of Durban in the eastern section of the country. In the past few years,
thousands of Pondo tribesmen moved into the region looking for work and
land to settle on.
The Zulus demand the Pondos leave the area because it lacks enough
jobs and land to accomodate both tribes, which bear grudges going
back more than a century.
Witnesses said about 400 Pondos were arrested and driven to the near-
by Isipingo police station.
New Delhi hotel fire kills 37
NEW DELHI, India - A fire believed caused by an electrical short cir-
cuit swept through the lower floors of a luxury hotel before dawn yester-
day killing at least 37 people, including one American, and injuring 41
others.
Fire officials said the blaze at the 10-story Siddharth Continental Hotel
- the worst ever in New Delhi - could have been halted by hotel em-

ployees but they fled in panic.
A few employees returned to help evacuate guests, some of whom
leaped from windows or climbed down knotted bed sheets to escape the
flames.
"They (the workers) had the facilities to control the fire," said senior
fire officer F.K. Dheri. "If they had acted, the fire would have been con-
trolled."
Among the victims were at least one American whose identity was
withheld pending notification of relatives.
Most of the victims suffocated in their sleep when smoke filled the
hotel.
0Iie MI~ih an U atI
Vol XCVI - No. 81
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the Fall and Winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April - $18.00 in Ann Arbor; $35.00 outside the city. One term -
$10.00 in town; $20.00 out of town.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and Sub-
scribes to United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles
Times Syndicate, and College Press Service.

0
S

Editor in Chief.................NEIL CHASE
Opinion Page Editors...........JODY BECKER
JOSEPH KRAUS
Managing Editors .......GEORGEA KOVANIS
JACKIE YOUNG
News Editor..............THOMAS MILLER
Features Editor........... LAURIE DELATER
City Editor...............ANDREW ERIKSEN
Personnel Editor............TRACEY MILLER
NEWS STAFF: Eve Becker, Melissa Birks, Laura
Bischoff, Rebecca Blumenstein, Joanne Cannella,
Philip Chidel, Dov Cohen, Kysa Connett, Tim
Daly, Nancy Driscoll, Rob Earle, Rachel Gottlieb,
Stephen Gregory, Linda Holler, Mary Chris
Jakelevic, Vibeke Laroi, Michael Lustig, Jerry
Markon, Eric Mattson, Amy Mindell, Kery Mura-
kami, Jill Oserowsky, Joe Pigott, Christy Riedel,
Michael Sherman, Jennifer Smith, Jeff Widman,
Cheryl Wistrom.
Associate Opinion Page Editor .. KAREN KLEIN
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Gayle Kirshenbaum,
David Lewis, Henry Park, Peter Mooney, Susanne

Chief Photographer...............DAN HABIB
PHOTO STAFF: Jae Kim, Scott Lituchy, John
Munson, Matt Petrie, Dean Randazzo, Andi
Schreiber, Darrian Smith.
Sports Editor ................ TOM KEANEY
Associate Sports Editors..........JOE EWING
BARB McQUADE, ADAM MARTIN,
PHIL NUSSEL, STEVE WISE
SPORTS STAFF: Dave Aretha, Mark Borowsky,
Debbie deFrances, Liam Flaherty, Steve Green-
baum, Rachel Goldman, Jon Hartmann, Darren
Jasey, Phil Johnson, Rick Kaplan, Christian Mar-
tin, Scott Miller, Greg Molzon, Brad Morgan,
Jerry Muth, Adam Ochlis, Chris Parker, Mike
Redstone, Duane Roose, Jeff Rush, Scott Shaffer,.
Pete Steinert, Douglas Volan.
Business Manager .........DAWN WILLACKER
Display Sales Manger ....... CYNTHIA NIXON
Assistant Sales Manager ..KATHLEEN O'BRIEN
Classified Manager ......GAYLA BROCKMAN
Finance Manager.......... MIKE BAUGHMAN
Marketing Manager ......,.... JAKE GAGNON
DISPI AV AI 1 . ri ...: D.n.... L na. aa

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan