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January 24, 1986 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-01-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Marcos blasts critics
Sof his war record

The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 24, 1986- Page 3
Liberal arts options described

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From AP and UPI
MANILA, Philippines-President
Ferdinand Marcos said yesterday
that he would ignore the "crazy indiv-
duals" who question the war record
on which he built his political career.
He made the comment in a cam-
paign speech to a crowd that included
many World War II veterans, after The
New York Times published an article
citing U.S. Army investigations that
found his claim of leading guerrillas
against the Japanese to be
"fraudulent."
In yesterday's editions, the Times
cited 400 pages of Army reports on
Marcos' military career. The reports
said Ang Mag Maharlika, the
guerrilla group he says he led, "never
existed" as a fighting organization
and was not controlled adequately
"because of the desertion of its com-
manding officer" - Marcos
The president, now 68 years old,
won 27, 28, 32 or 33 medals, depending
on the Philippine government report
accepted. He is described here as the
mnst decorated soldier of the war and

claims more honors than Gen.
Douglas MacArthur, who directed the
Allied War in the Pacific.
His war record is so important to
Marcos that he talks about it in nearly
every interview and speech, and in
1982 closed down a newspaper that
printed articles challenging it.
He says he suffered five war woun-
ds and tells war stories in his cam-
paign speeches for the Feb. 7 election,
in which he is opposed by Corazon
Aquino, widow of assassinated op-
position leader Benigno Aquino.
Aquino, meanwhile, unleashed her
strongest attack yet against Marcos,
yesterday calling him "an evil
genius"who ripped "out the heart" of
democracy.
Interrupted 33 times by applause
from 1,500 businessmen and civic
leaders packed in a ballroom of the
posh Manila Hotel, Aquino outlined a
political program focusing on con-
stitutional reforms she intends to im-
plement if she topples Marcos in the
Feb. 7 election.

By MICHAEL LADD
What job can a liberal arts graduate
get in this high-tech world? Technical
advertiser Steven Bennett said
yesterday that although liberal arts
degree holders may not reap im-
mediate financial rewards, their
skills qualify them for a wide variety
of careers.
Bennett, who holds a doctorate in
Asian Studies from Harvard Univer-
sity, speaksdfrom personal experien-
ce. He specialized in geomancy, the
ancient Chinese science of locating
buildings and burial plots in their
correct spatial and spiritual align-
ment. Some Chinese believe that
living in the incorrect space in the
cosmos will bring ill health and bad
luck, he said.
Although Bennett went to China to
make a career ,ut of his interest in
geomancy, he found his specialization
to be impracticp' and unprofitable.

He realized, however, that many fir-
ms would value the other skills he
developed during his education.
"LSA students are desirable
because they know how to learn,"
Bennett said. Because liberal arts
students are so broadly educated,
they are qualified for many jobs out-
side their majors such as com-
munications, research, personnel
counseling, public relations, and
marketing.
According to Bennett, com-
munications skills learned in a liberal
arts education are the key to finding a
job. He cited an IBM study which
found that employees with liberal arts
degrees advance more quickly in the
corporation than their coworkers with
business degrees.
Bennett's first job after leaving
China was ghost-writing for a medical
journal. although he knew nothing
about medicine, his well-rounded

Bennett
... stresses communication skills

Grad student, Soviet
spouse return home

HAPPENINGS

(Continued from Page 1)
Kalamazoo yesterday.
"I was very embarrassed to be in
the focus of such attention. It put too
much pressure on me," Lodisev said.
"You never get this much attention in
Russia."
Reflecting on the fact that the
couple spent two days together in New
York and now have all their time
together, Gubin said, "It's wonder-
ful.

still separated. "I guess the only thing
that's really bothering us is when
we'll see the other 20 reunited. That's
our biggest concern right now.
Everything else we can manage."
THE COUPLE is scheduled to meet
with Congressman Howard Wolpe on
Saturday to discuss the issue of
divided spouses.
Lodisev said he will seek a job as a
computer programmer, for which he
has training. Although the program-
ming fundamentals are the same in

education enabled him to research
and write stories for the journal.
After his initial success, Bennett's
job responsibilities broadened. The
medical journal and other journals
that were familiar with his work con-
tracted Bennett to illustrate his own
articles, and today Bennett owns a
technical advertising firm which
produces graphs and charts for
various publications.
Bennett said that if liberal arts
graduates can't find a job, they can
create their own if they use their
imaginations and creativity.
For those who want to create their
own businesses, it is important to
realize beforehand that it is all right
to fail. Bennett pointed out that taking
risks, even if they prove unsuccessful,
can enhance a resume.
Bennett advised aspiring en-
trepreneurs to assess unmet needs in
the market to get ideas for a business.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES
ERS and MUSICAL THEATRE
will be auditioning for professional
L THEATRE PERFORMERS. Weekly
formers, depending on the role, start
ellent benefits.
JOIS
6 (Saturday)'
e-Theatre Music Center
atre"
eet
an and Wabash)
2 p.m. males
s of age by June 1, 1986
licture
ire movement
%LL AMERICAN COLLEGE
nd are auditioning for versatile
lists (all instruments). Eleven week
and of $210.- $220., guest
I.
OTS
1986 (Saturday and Sunday)
g
n
s of age by June 1, 1986
nd All Instruments
nents call - Disney Audition Tour'86
Singers & Musical Theatre)
ege Instrumentalists)
, 0 a.m. - 4 p.m. ESW
c1985 Wait Disney Productions

TWO EXCITING ENTERTAINMENTI
1 PROFESSIONAL DANCERS.SINGE

Friday

Highlight

The English Department is sponsoring tonight a reading by Seamus
Heaney, Galway Kinnell, Wendell Berry and Donald Hall. It will begin
at 8 p.m. in Rackham Auditorium.
See WEEKEND for films and performances.
Speakers
Near Eastern and North African Studies - Lois al Faruqi, "Unity and
Variety in the Music of Islamic Culture," 4 p.m., room 2021, LS&A Bldg.
Kelsey Museym - Fikret Yegul, "The Bath-Gymnasium Complex at
Sardis: 25 years of Excavation and Restoration," 8 p.m., Aud. D, Angell
Hall.
Engineering - David Mildner, "Neutron Scattering and Fractals,"
3:45 p.m., White Aud., Cooley Bldg.
Natural Resources - Leslie Lokken, "Michigan's Forest Product
Target Industry Program," 3 p.m., room 1046, Dana.
South and Southeast Asian Studies - Brown bag lecture, Eleanor
Munro, "On Pilgrimage (in India & to the Borobudur)," noon, Commons
Room, Lane Hall.
School of Music - "Music of the Near East and North Africa, III," 1
p.m., room 307, Burton Tower.
Meetings
Juggling club - 3 p.m., Union
University Aikido Club - 5 p.m., Wrestling room, IMSB.
International Students Fellowship - 7 p.m.
Miscellaneous
Society of Women Engineers - Pre-interview meeting, Motorola, 8:30
a.m., room 3214, E. Engineering.
Minority Organization of Rackham - Graduate and professional
students party, 9 p.m., Pendleton Room, Union.
Indian American Student Assoc. - Welcome back - Republic Day par-
ty, 8 p.m., Trotter House.
International Folk Dancing - 8:30 p.m., Angell Elementary School.
Asian American Assoc./Minority Student Services - Reception, 4:30
p.m., School of Business Admin.
Hillel - Services, Conserv. and Ortho., 5:15 p.m.; Reform, 8 p.m., 1429
Hill.
Women's Basketball - Michigan State 7:30 p.m., Crisler Arena.
Microcomputer Education - Workshops, FinalWord (Pt. II), 1 p.m.;
Microsoft Word for IBM-Compatible Microcomputers (Pt. II0), 8:30
a.m., room 3001, SEB.
Korean Christian Fellowship - Bible study 9 p.m., Campus Chapel.
University Club - Buffet, 11:30 a.m.
Saturday
Highlight
The Student Nurses' Association presents a dance-a-thon benefit for the
Ronald McDonald House of Ann Arbor. The fundraiser will be held at the
Ann Arbor Inn.
Speakers
Ecology Center - Warren Wagner, "Environmental Problems and
Education," 7 p.m., 310 S. Ashley.
Hillel - Ricky Sherover-Marcuse, "The Toll of Jewish Minority Status;
Unlearning the Effects of Anti-Semitism," 1 p.m., Hillel.
Meetings
Alpha Phi Omega - 7 p.m., Union.
Miscellaneous
Hockey - Michigan State, 7:30 p.m., Yost Ice Arena.
Canterbury House - Episcopal Worship Service, 5 p.m., 218 N.
Division.
Student Wood and Craft Shop - Woodturning for beginners, 3 p.m.
University Lutheran Church - Worship, 8:15 & 10 a.m., 1511
Washtenaw.

"I THOUGHT I wouldn't believe it both countries, the U.S. computer in-
for a while," she continued, "but it's dustry is more advanced, Lodisev
all so natural that it just seems like said. "I'll be able to adjust if I try," he
this is the way it should be. It's fan- added.
tastic. "He's done remarkably well in
"We're still in some sense these last few days. I'm extremely
newlyweds, but there is no tension. proud of him," Gubin said. "He's ad-
Everything is terrific." justed and dealt with this with a cool
Gubin however, is still concerned and a calm head ... and he's really
about those Soviet-American couples been fantastic."
Campu

l
a
2
7
1

. rn r o i w .rw c v v u
PERFORMERS
Walt Disney World Co., Orlando, FLv
DANCERS, SINGERS and MUSICAL
salaries for chorus and principle per
between $298. and $432., plus exce
SITE: CHICAGO, ILLIN
January 25, 1986
Columbia Colleg
"11th Street Thea
62 East 11 th Stre
(between Michig
10 a.m. females;
REQUIREMENTS: Must be 18 years
B ring Resume/Pi
All positions requ
2. OLLEGE INSTRUMENTALISTS -A
ORCHESTRA AND BANDS
Walt Disney World Co. and Disneyla
college undergraduate instrumenta
summer positions with weekly stiper
conductors/clinicians, plus housing
SITE: CHICAGO, ILLIN
January 25-26,1
DePaul Universit
Fine Arts Buildin
804 West Belden
9 a. m. -5 p.m.
REQUIREMENTS: Must be 18 year
Bring Resume an
Prepare Excerpts
For specific information and requirerr
(305) 828-1576 (Dancers,
305' 828-1717(Code
Call onday- Friday

Sunday

?great look derervei anoth4
Come to Hair EHpreff during our Grand Opening
and get a great haircut along with a card to get
your neHt haircut FREE

Highlight

Hillel is holding a workshop on "The Toll of Jewish
Unlearning the Effects of Anti-Semitism," with Dr.
Marcuse. The program will begin at 1 p.m. at Hillel.

Minority Status;
Ricky Sherover-

Meetings
Ann Arbor Go Club - 2 p.m., room 1433, Mason Hall.
Miscellaneous
Asian American Assoc./Minority Student Services - Panel, The Rise
of Anti-Asian Violence: Reasons and Responses, 1 p.m., room 126, East
Quad.

U *f vA%0u1 'M r W p I~E -

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