100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 04, 1984 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-11-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Sunday, November 4, 1984
FREE TRIP TO THE ROSE BOWL
(RESTAURANT)
333 E. Huron
(across from the Ann Arbor News)
U .U
Daily 8-8; Sun. 9-5 .
This ad is redeemable for a complimentary
vegetable or dessert.
.

Sandinistas hope vote
will legitimize regime

IN BRIEF
Complied from Associated Press and
United Press International reports

HILLEL'S
BEIT MIDRASH PROGRAM
announces the 1st session of the
mini-course series -
GENESIS THROUGH THE
EYES OF MIDRASH
taught by Prof. Aaron Twersky,
visiting professor at U-M Law School
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 5 - 7:00 P.M.
1429 Hill

MANAGUA, Nicaragua (AP) - The
leftist Sandinista government,;assured
of winning today's elections, pushed
hard for a strong turnout to back up its
claim that the vote is legitimate,
despite the lack of substantial op-
postion.
Officials predicted that 80 percent of
the 1.58 million eligible voters would go
to the polls today. Some residents said
Sandinista militants were pressuring
them to vote.
THE OFFICIAL Sandinista newspaper,
Barricada, carried a headline quoting
Mariano Fiallos, president of
the Supreme Electoral Council, as
saying, "The citizens will turn out
massively at the polls."
The elections for president, vice
president and a 90-member national
assembly, to serve six-year terms, are
the first since the Sandinistas came to
power five years ago in a bloody
revolution that ended 42 years of rule by
the rightist, pro-America Somoza
dynasty.
Today's election will be the first here
since 1974, when Anastasio Somoza
Debayle was elected to a second, six-
year term that was cut short by the
revolution.
The Sandinista National Liberation
Front is campaigning against five
small parties. All of them are leftist or
have cooperated with the government
to some degree.
A SIXTH small party, the Liberal In-
dependent Party, remained on the
ballot, but its presidential candidate,
Virgilio Godoy, announced two weeks
ago he would not campaign.
Godoy gave the same reasons as the

major opposition coalition, the
Nicaraguan Democratic Coordinate,
for not participating in the elections.
The coalition said the Sandinistas did
not allow conditions for a free and open
election. They complained of press cen-
sorship and restrictions on assemblies.
Although there were no expectations
that the opposition coalition of four
political parties, two labor unions and
the leading private enterprise group
would have won, there were estimates
that it could have taken as many as one-
third of the seats in the assembly.
A WIDE-open race would have helped
the Sandinistas in their effort to im-
prove their prestige abroad and deflect
criticism that they are moving toward
totalitarianism. It would also have im-
proved their status domestically.
An estimated 75,000 people turned out
for a final Sandinista campaign rally
Thursday night, but there were few
other visible signs of the election other
than the usual black and red adver-
tisements of the Sandinista Front.
At a news conference, Daniel Ortega,
the Sandinista presidential candidate
and current junta coordinator,
reiterated his claim that American in-
vasion was imminent.
Interior minister Thomas Borge told
reporters he had learned from sources
close to the American government that
a direct intervention is planned in the
months after the election.
U.S. officials have denied repeatedly
that any such plans exist. The Reagan
administration supports Nicaraguan
rebels fighting the Sandinistas in nor-
thern and southern Nicaragua.

PRESIDENTIAL
DEBATE
BETWEEN NAT'L REPS OF
COLLEGE DEMOCRATS
REPUBLICANS
DVOTE VOTEDVOTED VOTED VOTE
MONDAY NOV 5TH AT 4:00,
KUENZEL ROOM, UNION
SPONSORED BY: MSA, COLLEGE DEMS,
COLLEGE REPS, LSA-sg,
VP STUDENT SERVICES, UAC et al.

Campaign nears end,
taxes still the issue

NOW HIRING
UM students only
Part - time work
available in all
Food Service areas.
Apply in Person, Rm. 2400, Michigan Union

From AP and UPI
Walter Mondale and President
Reagan are ending the 1984 campaign
the same way it began, with Mondale
accusing Reagan yesterday of planning
a "tough, rough tax" increase and the
president saying heatedly it just wasn't
so.
Both men were crisscrossing the
Midwest - Reagan pushing toward the
possibility of an unprecedented 50-state
sweep next Tuesday, Mondale striving
to win what would be the biggest
presidential upsetin memory.
MONDALE, barnstorming across
four states, told several thousand sup-
porters in Mount Clemens, Mich. that
Reagan "talks a good game about trade
and taxes but it's all talk and no jobs."
With aides seeing an upturn to Mon-
dale in key Democratic strongholds, the
Democratic presidential candidate set
out on a swing through Michigan, rural
Illinois, St. Louis, Mo., and Memphis,
Tenn., in a last-ditch wooing of the par-
ty's key constituents.
Mondale promised the audience in
Mount Clemens, which included many
union members, that he would support
domestic content legislation and multi-
year quotas to help restore prosperity
to the ailing auto industry.

REAGAN, speaking yesterday at a
rally in Little Rock, Ark., declared that
taxes would be raised in a second term
''over my dead body."
"There's been some rumors floating
around about suspected tax increases
on our side," the president said. "Don't
you believe it."
He apparently was referring to
published reports that as part of its ef-
fort to reform the tax system, his ad-
ministration will propose eliminating
the deductions many federal taxpayers
now claim for state and local income-
tax payments and also will propose
taxing unemployment benefits and
workers' compensation.
"You can't trust Ronald Reagan, the
surprise president," said Geraldine
Ferraro in Dayton, Ohio, contending
that he would wipe out tax breaks for
the middle class and attack Social
Security if returned to the White House.
If taxes go up, she said, "let's raise
them fairly. If this president won't level
with us about it, then let's replace him
with one who will."
Vice President George Bush, cam-
paigning in Maryland, said a second
Reagan administration would have as
its objective a continuation of the
economic recovery and a verifiable
reduction in the pace of the arms race.

Baby Fae passes crucial days
LOMA LINDA, Calif. - Baby Fae, in the most critical period since her
historic baboon heart transplanteight days ago, was reported "right on
track" yesterday with no signs of rejection of the animal organ.
The baby, now 3 weeks old, underwent the transplant Oct. 26 at Loma Lin-
da, 60 miles east of Los Angeles.
Doctors at Loma Linda University Medical Center had another baboon on
standby should the tiny infant reject the primate heart and a human donor
cannot be found during the weekend.
The weekend was described as the most critical period - seven to 10 days
following the surgery - when rejection of transplanted human hearts nor-
mally occurs.
Doctorswere optimistic about the transplant because the infant is too
young to have a fully developed immune system and he body may not
recognize her new heart as foreign.
Youth held in Do yski mlurder
DETROIT - Police said yesterday a 16-year-old youth was the primary
suspect in the slaying of a man outside a downtown restaurant during the
World Series celebration.
A police spokesman said investigators believe the suspect shot Raymond
Dobrzynski, 27, or Ypsilanti, while trying to steal his car.
"He wanted a car to get home" after he was separated from his friends, a
police source told the Detroit News.
The newspaper reported the source said the youth apparently used his
father's pistol.
Dobrzynski was found in his car parked outside a restaurant about a mile
from Tiger Stadium where thousands of people swarmed into the streets af-
ter the Tigers beat the San Diego Padres to win the World Series.
He had been shot once in the back and was dead on arrival at Detroit
Receiving Hospital.
Irish fear revenge from Brits
DUBLIN, Ireland - An IRA political leader predicted Saturday that
Britain will seek revenge for last month's hotel bomb attempt to kill Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher and her Cabinet members.
"The British government is not going to sit back and allow the situation
where the cabinet was almost wiped out and not take reprisal action," Sinn
Fein President Gerry Adams said in an interview as the Irish Republican
Army's political branch opened its annual convention.
The IRA is outlawed in both the Irish Republic and in Northern Ireland,
but its political arm, Sinn Fein, is legal.
Adams said he expected that the British, either using their own agents or
Protestant gunmen, "are going to execute people. We have no doubt about
that at all."
The two-day Sinn Fein conference began amid tight security sparked by
fears that pro-British Protestants from Northern Ireland would seek to
avenge the Oct. 12 bombing in Brighton on England's south coast.
Priest's death revives Solidarity
WARSAW, Poland - An estimated 250,000 Poles attended the funeral of a
slain pro-Solidarity priest yesterday, and thousands of them then marched
three miles through Warsaw, cheering Lech Walesa and chanting "There is
no freedom without Solidarity!"
They bore Solidarity banners, and shouted Walesa's name. Walesa atten-
ded the service along with many other Solidarity leaders and spoke at the
funeral.
Walesa, his voice thundering through a bank of loudspeakers, told them,
"We shall never forget this death."
The crowd repeated his words, then broke into a deafening chant of
"Solidarity!"
It was the largest audience Walesa had faced since before the December
1981 imposition of martial law, which banished Solidarity.
Dozens of police with trucks and water cannon accompanied the marchers
along their route. Some police wore full riot gear, but they did not interfere
and no incidents were reported.
The restraint showed by police was a sign that communist authorities did
not want a confrontation on the day of Jerzy Popieluszko's funeral. The body
of the 37-year-old priest was pulled from a reservoir last Tuesday, 11 days af-
ter he was kidnapped.
Ethiopian relief airlift begins
ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia - British Royal Air Force cargo planes
carrying trucks, trailers and tents began arriving in Addis Ababa yesterday
as part of an international airlift to ferry food to millions of Ethiopians
faced with death by starvation.
The Ethiopian government has refused to give a potential death toll for the
famine, but unofficial figures have said more than 250 people are dying
daily in the worst-hit northern provinces of Eritrea, Tigre and Wallo.
Fifty-two other aircraft from the United States, the Soviet Union,
Bulgaria, Libya and South Yemen will also arrive within the next few weeks.
Two U.S. transport were scheduled to arrive tomorrow as were the first
planes from the Soviet Union. Three Libyan Hercules transports arrived
Friday.

I4

I4

r

4

14

I

UNIVERSITY
CLUB

EATERIES &
COMMONS

THE
CLUB

A NON-DISCRIMINATORY, AFFIRMATIVE
ACTION EMPLOYER

I

The Department of Philosophy
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR
presents
RICHARD M. HARE
White's Professor of Moral Philosophy
UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD
in a Public Lecture
"PATRIOTISM AND PACIFISM"
NOVEMBER 5, 1984 - 8:00 P.M.
THE MICHIGAN UNION - KUENZEL ROOM
Admission is Free

Focus
on
America's
Future
Help Prevent Birth Defects
SSupport the
March of Dimes
BIRTH DEFECTS FOUNDATION

Candidates
tackle
deficits
(Continued from Page 1)
The political science professor said
the real strength of a nation like the
United States lies in the fact that the
American workforce, stability of the
government, and the health of our
existing systems is being maintained.
Organski suggested that it is here
where Mondale finds his best argument
against incumbent Reagan. If the
United States is doing well in these
three areas, as Republican rhetoric
suggests, a nuclear arsenal should be
unnecessary. If U.S. -Soviet
negotiations are successful, Organski
said, the threat which leads to defense
spending might be diminished.
The political scientist added that
"Mondale, in effect, is saying to
Reagan, you've used (Russian) un-
willingness to negotiate as an excuse."
POETRY READING
with
ALAN CHEUSE and DIANE RAPTOSH
reading from their works
Monday, November 5
8 p.m. at
GUILD HOUSE - 802 Monroe
ADMISSION FREE
Read

4

THIS SPACE CONTRIBUTED BY THE PUBLISHER

Vol. XCV - No.52
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967X) is published Tuesday through Sunday
during the Fall and Winter terms and Tuesday through Saturday during the
Spring and Summer terms by students at the University of Michigan. Sub-
scription rates: September through April - $16.50 in Ann Arbor; $29.00
outside the city; May through August - $4.50 in Ann Arbor, $6.00 outside the
city. Second-class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. Postmaster: Send
address changes to The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to
United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syndi-
cate and'College Press Service, and United Students Press Service.
Edtor in chief ............ BILL SPINDLE Sports Editor ............ MIKE MCGRAW M
Managing Editors................CHERYL BAACKE Associate Sports Editors .............JEFF BERGIDA
NEIL CHASE KATIE BLACKWELL
PAUL HELGREN
Associote News Editors ............ LAURIEDELATER DOUGLAS B. LEVY
GEORGEA KOVANIS STEVE WISE,
THOMAS MILLER
Personnel Editor...... ..............SUE BARTO SPORTS STAFF: Dove Aretha, Mark Borowski, Joe
Opinion Page Editors ................. JAMES BOYD Ewing, Chris Gerbasi. Jim Gindin, Skip Goodman,
JACKIE YOUNG Steve Herz, Rick Kaplan, Tom Keaney, Tim Makinen,
NEWS STAFF: Lauro Bischoff, Dov Cohen, Stephonie Adam Martin, Scott McKinlay, Barb McQuade, Brad
DeGroote, Nancy Dolinko, Mary Beth Doyle. Lily Eng, Morgan. Jerry Muth, Phil Nussel, Mike Redstone.
Marcy Fleischer, Bob Gordon, Rachel Gottlieb, Thomas Scott Salowich. Randy Schwartz, Susan Warner.
Hrach, Gregory HuttonBruceJacksonSeanJacksn.

COMnEDY

Ann Arbor's own

I W Comedy Theater
COMPANY Troupe

Ei
M
A
P
O
N
D
M
H

%%

Live

Carrie Levine, Jerry Morkon, Eric Mattson, Curtis
Maxwell, Molly Melby, Tracey Miller, Kery Murakomi, Business Manager ................. STEVEN BLOOM
Lisa Powers, Elizabeth Reiskin, Charles Sewell, Stacey Advertising Manager...........MICHAEL MANASTER
Shonk, Dan Swanson, Allison Zousmer. Display Manager ................... LIZ CARSON
Magazine Editor .................. JOSEPH KRAUS Nationals Manager............. JOE ORTIZ
Associate Magazine Editors ... PAULA DOHRING Sales Manager ................ DEBBIE DIOGUIARDI
1CfHN Mr.11: - -

i
S
y
1

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan