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November 04, 1984 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1984-11-04

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The Michigan Daily --Sunday, November 4, 1984 - Page 3
U-Club serves edible entertainment

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By STEPHANIE SIMON
For many dormitory residents, the
thought of scrounging up Sunday dinner
can be depressing.
Faced with staring at their rom-
mates' dirty clothes while they heat a
can of Spaghetti-Os in their hot pot,
many students have turned to the U-
Club, where a dinner and movie
program, like the growing number of
dinner theatres in the area, has put
some excitement into dining.
FEATURING movies like, Arthur,
All That Jazz, and Grease, the U-Club's
version of a dinner theatre also serves
up an Italian buffet for moviegoers.
Dan Segal, the U-Club's entertain-
ment coordinator, said the dinner and
movie night was created this term for
students who live in dormitories who
don't get Sunday dinner and for
students who just don't feel like
cooking.
"It's a get-away for the students - an
enjoyable break," Segal said. "And the
evening ends early enough, so that
people have time to study afterwards if
they want."
ONE PROBLEM U-Club officials had
to deal with for the theatre was the
screen placement and viewing accom-
modations, because the U-Club was not
designed to show movies.
"(The screen) is makeshift. We know
that, but we're also not a theatre; it is a
dining room," said Alan Brown, the U-

Club's marketing manager. "If the
evening continues to be successful,
we'll look into a large pull down movie
screen."
Reaction to the dinner and movie
night has been good so far this year. At
a recent showing of Attack of the Killer
Tomatoes, Brown said the U-Club at-
tracted 180 people to view the film.
KYLE LANGE, an LSA senior who
attended a recent showing, was pleased
with the movie and meal. "This is a
great idea - a total student package,"
Lange said.
One East Quad resident said the food
was "much better than anything I've
had in a dorm."
The U-Club is planning to show Being
There, Private Benjamin, and Oliver in
December. The cost for a dinner and
movie package is $4.99.
THOUGH THE dinner and movie
combination is new this fall to the U-
Club, the concept of a dinner and
theatre is an old idea.
In the Detroit area, the Somerset
Dinner Theatre has been in business for
eight-and-a-half years. "Business is
stable," said Al Loenstein, the owner.
"We have a mailing list of 9,000, special
shows for groups, and gift certificates."
The recent popularity of dinner
theatres has spawned a growth in small
theatres.
"There are twice as many com-
munity theatres today as there were

three years ago," said Florence
Larime, producer of a current musical
review at Lelli's Dinner Theatre in
Detroit.
"Dinner theatre was started to utilize
good talent in this town," she said.
Many performers will stay in the
Detroit area rather than going to New
York City to look for work, Larime said.
" DAILY FIRST MAT

SAYS
NO
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ZONE

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1
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TINEE ONLY $2.00........1..

Man the pumps Associated Press
The stern of the petrochemical tanker Puerto Rican is all that's still afloat
after the 632-foot tanker was ripped apart southeast of San Francisco by
three mysterious explosions last Wednesday.
-HAPPENINGS-

Dignitaries mourn Gandhi

Sunday

Highlight

The Professional Theatre Program presents their version of the Opera Die
Fledermaus at 2p.m. at the Lydia Menhelsohn Theatre.
Films
Cinema Guild - The Last Hurrah, 7 p.m., Prisoner of Shark Island, 9:15
p.m., Lorch Hall.
Mediatrics - The Obscure Object of Desire, 7:15 & 9:00 p.m., MLB 4.
Michigan Theatre Foundation - Dr. Doolittle, 4 & 7 p.m., Michigan
Theatre.
Hill Street Cinema - Les Violins Du Bal, 6:45 & 9:15 p.m., 1429 Hill Street.
Performances
The Ark - Sippie Wallace's Birthday Party with Jim Dapogny's Chicago
Blues Band, 2 p.m., 637 South Main Street.
University Musical Society - The Masterplayers, 4 p.m., Rackham
Auditorium.
Dance - Annual Faculty Concert, 3 p.m., Dance Building Studio A.
Performance Network - Dance Theatre II, 4 p.m., 408 W. Washington
Street.
School of Music - James Wilhelmsen Piano Recital, 4 p.m.; French Horn
Students Recital, 8p.m., Recital Hall.
Speakers
Comprehensive Studies Program - Kenneth Manning, "The Case of Er-
nest Everett Just," 6 p.m., Hale Auditorium, the Business School.
Miscellaneous
St. Francis Parish - Christmas Bazaar, 9:30 to 2 p.m., 2270 E. Stadium
Blvd.
Canterbury House - Episcopal Worship Service, 5 p.m., 218 North
Division.
Monda
Highlight
The College Democrats square off against the College Republicans in a
pre-election debate with national representatives of both groups at 4 p.m., in
the Kuenzel Room of the Michigan Union.
Films
Cinema Guild - The Battle of Algiers, 7 p.m., Lorch Hall.
Performances
School of Music - String Department Recital, 8 p.m., Recital Hall.
Performance Theatre Program - MacBeth, 8 p.m., Power Center.
Prism Productions - The Hoodoo Gurus from Australia, 10 p.m., Rick's
Cafe, 611 Church Street.
Speakers
College of Engineering - Richard Phillips, "The Apple Lisa and Macin-
tosh Training Session," 7 p.m., Carrol Auditorium, Chrysler Center.
Chemistry - Bob Howell, "Chemistry of Alkenylarene (Chromium) -
Carbonyl Complexes," 4p.m., Room 1200 Chemistry Building.
Philosophy - Richard Hare, "Patriotism and Pacifism," 8 p.m., Kuenzel
Room, Michigan Union.
Meetings
Comic Opera Guild - Organizational meeting for the March production of
The Brigands, 7:30 p.m., Burns Park Elementary School, 1414 Wells.

'Continued from Page 1)
assassination.
The new government, under Gandi's
son, Rajiv, was coming under sharp,
criticism for failing to control the
violence.
THE HINDU-Sikh violence was
blamed for the relatively small size of
the funeral-day crowds - smaller than
those that attended the cremation along
the same riverbanks of Gandhi's father
in 1964, and of the assassinated Indian
independence leader Mohandas Gan-
dhi in 1948.
Up to 300,000 lined the route while
200,000 watched the cremation. Police
said many stayed away out of fear of a
renewal of rioting.
Despite the violence, however, the
funeral was attended by leaders and
dignitaries from 104 nations.
Mourners included Secretary of State
George Shultz, Britain's Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher, Soviet
Premier Nikolai Tikhonov, First Lady
Imelda Marcos of the Philippines and
Yasser Arafat, leader of the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
Shultz said he complained "for-
cefully" to Soviet Premier Nikolai
Tikhonov on Saturday about Soviet
news- reports suggesting American in-
volvement in the assassination of Gan-
dhi.
In reports last week on the Gandhi
assassination, the official Soviet news
media blamed it on "India's opponents
abroad" and accused the CIA of sup-
porting Sikh extremists.
"He (Tikhonov) said he had looked
into it and the Soviet Union had no such
view,".Shultz said. "He suggested I was
wrong in saying the reports came out of
the Soviet Union."
Yesterday, the Soviet news agency
Tass said the State Department
"calumniously charged" that the
Soviet press was encouraging anti-
American sentiment in India and
WOMEN'S LIVES
Conversations on how women
grow and change.
(A brown-bag lunch series)
November 6, Noon
PRINGLE SMITH
Editor and Journalist, School of
Business Administration
at Guild House
802 MONROE
This program is sponsored by Guild House Campus Ministry
and funded in party by Michigan Commission/United Minis-
tries in Higher Education.

fomenting violence, because "some
people in the United States would like to
deflect the blame away from the true
culprits responsible for India's tragedy
and from their patrons."
Shultz also took the opportunity to
meet with several other foreign
leaders, including Gandhi's son and
successor, Rajiv Gandhi, who voiced
concern over U.S. arms sales to
Pakistan.
In his meeting with Gandhi, Shultz
said he reaffirmed the U.S. ad-
ministration's support for the "in-
dependence, integrity and unity" of In-
dia.
Shultz said he hoped to improve and
expand U.S.-Indian ties, which often
have been strained under Gandhi's
regime.
The new leader "came through with a
sort of quiet strength that I found very
reassuring," Shultz said. He said he
passed along a message from President
Reagan inviting him to visit in early
1985, and that although Gandhi did not
formally accept, he expressed a desire
to go.

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A Campus Traditioan

College clothing styles
have changed but college
lifestyles haven't.
Problems like studying late,
a busy social schedule, limited
finances, and mass produced
meals have faced generations of
students.
For over 20 years, Domino's Pizza
has been delivering pizza to
campuses all across the country.

Be part of a college tradition,
and give us a call for fast,
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ANN ARBOR LOCATIONS:
761-1111 . ..... East Ann St.
769-5511 ........ Broadway
761-9393 .. Packard at Dewey
769-4555 .... .. West Liberty
996-0881 ......North Maple

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