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October 09, 1984 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-10-09

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e

ARTS
Tuesday, October 9, 1984

The Michigan Daily
r ..

Page 5

.just

another letter in the alphabet

B C. E. Krell
WTM .... uh,..... huh,...... .
.well,. . . . .gee, . . . ...well,
.. . .I can't think ....... of ......
anything ...... to ...... say .......A .
. . rFfor assholes, like most of their fans
. .. 1 is for boring ... C is for cocky, like
theit eplacements . .. D is for dullness
lik'e'Exene's mind.. . E is for Exene, a
ditst . .. F is for fruitless, which this ar-
ticle is ... G is for gnarly ... H is for
Haimurabi, who never gets his name
in'tiie paper . . I is for inspiring, like
'Color Me Impressed" . . . J is for
Jers, like the people who wouldn't let
anyne dive for the Replacements...
X 'is for kill . . . L is for lalalalal,
which X sang a Lot . . . M is for
monotonous, more more more ... N is
nothing, which is what I have to say ...
O is for Osterberg, James, who
probably wasn't there ... P is for pret-

ty, like the backdrop . . . Q is for
quagmire...
R is for rip roaring rockin
replacements ... S is for superfluous . .
. T is for tornado, a picture of which was
on the interesting backdrop. . . U is for
Ugly .. . V is for vacuous coffee-nosed
perverts.. . W is for white as in race.
Everything was white. White as in
White Girl.. . another ho hum ho hum
ho hum ho hum white song by X. . . X is
just another letter in the alphabet ... Y
is for yucky. . . Z is for what X should
change their name to.
Now you have to do some real writing
boy. A striped paper cup. Holds about
twen or telve ounces. Throw in a bunch
of ice cream. Roll it up into a big soft
cold sticky bad aftertaste ball with a
bunch of air in it.
Perhaps it's a few days to old. Pour in
some skim milk. Stick it in a motorized
electric blender. Whiz whiz whirr thwip
thwip bzz bzz. Stop. Wait! You've
beaten it too much. Now it's just thin
scummy residue dope liquid.

Here we go gathering nuts in May, no,
October in Ann Arbor. Raking up a big
pile of red brown yellow leaves. Rake
rake rake. A nice big pile o' leaves. OK,
the Replacements are like raking a big
Fall pile of leaves and getting a nice
long heavy start, running like hell, and
leaping into the pile.
Revel ye, in the pile. Throw the
leaves about, swim in them. Old leaves,
new leaves throw leap, be gay. X is a
bad paper cup of ice cream that's been
overbuzzed.
I can't be any clearer than that.
Splash. Henry the fly leaps into the
bowl of pea green puke thick soup and
calmly swims about, having no care in
the world but the taste of his own good
soup, and the gross way in which the
sediment clings to his pubic hair. Wait.
Things look bad for our snotty insect as
huge letters of gummy noodle paste
begin to attack him. A is for assholes . .
The bowl spills as the San Andreas
fault gapes on the Michigan Theatre.

The best reggae band in Michigan

B Andy Weine
'MON 'N GET some fire in ya
feet!" yelled O.C. Roberts,
who led the Samaritans at the U-Club
Saturday night.
And the audience listened to him,
dapcing on a packed floor to sensational
Weggae music.
#ut it wasn't the sort of beat that
us4ally rocks the U-Club. Unlike many
hard-driving local bands, the
Saaritans played a more laid-back
anijmellow beat that didn't blare and
sqrpe your eardrum like sandpaper.
YeS; their music had irresistible dance-
appeal with the distinctive reggae
rhythm.
.The band was large, having six and
sometimes seven members, but the
ound wasn't cramped too tightly. The
members deftly utilized many in-
struments to create their great rhythm,
playing bongos, cowbells, tambourine,
various donging instruments, and
even a bird tweeter.

The Samaritans are a fairly recent
phenomenon in Detroit. Band members
come from Jamaica and England, as
well as the Detroit area. The band has
played in this area for three years, and
in 1982, they won the title for best
reggae band in the Detroit area.
"We're the only reggae band I know
that's part American, part Jamaican,"
said keyboardist Ed Brown. "Our
sound hasn't gelled into something
unique yet."
Those influences were evident in
their refreshing variety of music. After
paying tribute to Bob Marley, the band
played several of his tunes, including
"Chase Those Crazies." Other songs
were distinctly Jamaican, relating
ghetto conditions and love in the island
forests.
One song had the audience yelling
along with O.C. Roberts, We party, we
party, we're Rastafari! In their
political songs, they maintain Reggae's
most powerful trait; its message of
protest.
Detroit influence was evident in a

bopping rendition of Smokey Robin-
son's "Just My 'magination." By far,
most of their material was similarly
soothing lovesongs, some in the Motown
vein, such as "I Will Never Let You Go"
and "I Love You So!"
No matter how slow the tune, though,
it always made you want to dance.
Perhaps there's a subtle political
message here, too, in getting people
"offa their rumpos," as Roberts said, to
enjoy music actively rather than
passively.
For those of you who missed dancing
to the best reggae band in Michigan,
take heart in the band's hopes to play
Ann Arbor again sometime in the win-
ter.
Next on the Samaritan's agenda are
the big cities of Texas. But what place
does reggae music have in booming, oil-
rich Texas? As Ed Brown said,
"There's not a whole lot of black
music there, but once they hear it,
they'll know it isn't just local or
national; it's the whole world."

Y
.
r

Daily Photo by DOUG McMAHON
The band, X, plays at the Michigan Theater on Saturday night.

Cleveland Orchestra comes to Hill

Reading
her poems
DONNA BROOK
BENZINGER LIBRARY
East Quad
UM News in
The Daily
764-0552

MICHIGAN STUDENT ASSEMBLY NEEDS YOU!
Positions are now available on the following Regental and University Committees:
STUDENT LEGAL SERVICES
RESEARCH POLICIES - One grad student needed
4t s , AFFIRMATIVE ACTION r
UNIVERSITY COUNCILU
Stop by the MSA office for a full listing of open committee positions.
Applications are available now.
DEADLINE for submitting applications is WEDNESDAY,
OCTOBER 10, 1984 - 5:00 P.M:
For more information contact Laurie Clement, 3039 Michigan Union, 763-3241

On Wednesday, 10 October, the
Choral Union Series will present the
Cleveland Orchestra. The concert will
be in Hill Auditorium at 8:30 p.m.
The orchestra will perform three
pieces: Mozart's "Symphony No. 38"
(the "Prague" symphony),
Beethoven's "Grosse Fuge," and
Schumann's "Symphony No. 2."
The orchestra is preparing the
ozart and Schumann pieces for a con-
cert to be given on 20 October in Car-
negie Hall in New York City with Itzhak
Perlman as guest soloist.
AINN
ARBOR
. 5th Avenue at liberty St.
761-9700
$1 75 TUESDAY ALL DAY
v"SEUCI E"NESWE

Christoph von Dohnanyi will conduct
the orchestra. Dohnanyi is the gran-
dson of the Hungarian composer Ernst
von Dohnanyi, who was one of the in-
structors of Sir Georg Solti, music
director of the Chicago Symphony Or-
chestra.
Christoph von Dohnanyi has conduc-
ted most of the major symphonies and
opera companies on both sides of the
Atlantic, including the Chicago Sym-
phony Orchestra and the New York
Philharmonic.

He was artistic director and principal
conductor of the Hamburg State Opera
until assuming the music directorship
of the Cleveland Orchestra earlier this
year, filling the sizeable space left by
the death of George Szell.
Tickets are available at the Burton
Tower Box Office. Rush tickets will be
available to students for $5.00, as op-
posed to the regular price of $18.00,
from 4:00 to 4:30 on the afternoon of the
day of the concert.

- Knute Rife

Pursue a Rewarding Career
Shape the Future of
Jewish Life
Enjoy Freedom and Flexibility

"SEDUCTIVF"NEWSWEEK
ANOTH ER
C 0UNTR
k> D IY10 ,70 ,9 0

:a°
' :

A
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k

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proudly presents
CAMPUS
MEET THE PRESS
STARTS TOMORROW
in the Kuenzel Room of the Michigan Union
Special Guest:
PRESIDENT HAROLD SHAPIRO

LAST 3 DAYS'
Emotionally Touching
and Richly Haunting...
WENDY HUGHES

OsI ato

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Courses Leading to Degrees in:
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