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April 12, 1984 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-04-12

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The Semester May Be Ending -
But the Daily is Just Beginning!
WE'RE READY FOR
SPRING AND SUMMERI'

ARTS
The Michigan Daily Thursday, April 12, 1984 Page 6

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(PLEASE PRINT) LAST NAME FIRST
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Color
By Joe Hoppe
"G ET DRUNKER," yelled
someone in the Green on Red
audience at Joe's Star Lounge Tuesday
night, about halfway through the set.
"Hey, my liver can only take so
much. I got to drink my whiskey
diluted these days," said Dan Stuart,
who sang and played the guitar. Then
he wheeled his big red Gretsch with the
long silver whammy bar around,
picked up his glass of watered whiskey,
and drained it.
And as the night went on, he did in-
deed get drunker. By the time they
stopped playing, old Dan was thrashing
all over, having lots of fun, missing
lots of notes, and making a whole lot of
loud and distorted noise. That's just the
kind of band Green on Red is.
They're better live than they are on
the album - it's hard to get that reeling
enthusiasm down on vinyl. It's also
hard to get the kind of honesty Green on
Red appears to have so much of down
on a recording (talking about Gravity
Talks, on Slash, here). The band looked

like it was just full of a lot of nice guys.
The kind that hangs out at the bar
before and after the set, the kind that
;answers thetcallsin ethe audience
,(although they never did play
"Freebird").
Then there was the music. It's just so
pretty on the album, notes all
separated, produced, mechanical. The
music on Gravity Talks is mainly
baroque, and mainly nice.
Live at Joe's, their music was a mon-
ster. A mean distorted paisely monster
with real teeth. But still a friendly kind
of beast, when it came right down to it.
Live performance can be a kind of
great narrower, a great concentrator
so that the songs come out more as the
essence of what's on the album. Half
the time Stuart wasn't even singing
things to the same tune; but everything
you could want, and so much more, was
there.
Green on Red did a couple of covers.
They did "Hurricane," by Neil Young,
and they gave it the same kind of
treatment they did their own songs.
Neil Young-stuff got broadcast on a
narrow beam, full of keyboard poun-
dings and drunkenly missed notes.

Other fun cover choices; Patti
Smith's "Dancing Barefoot," and it all
ended up with Lou Reed's "Vicious,''
hopped up and almost unrecognizable:
That should give you an idea of'the kingl
of bandGreen on Red is, look at those
nice covers.
Oh, it was a fun time. They evep
played all the best songs from their
record; "Brave Generation," "Ol
Chief," "Five Easy Pieces," "Blue
Parade," and even "Snakebit" with its
silly lyrics (So you think that you
know/Religion and Science/What a
Show)was tolerable live.
An older song they played on one of
their many "encores" - "Black
Night:" Screaming rocking about
living on Hollywood Boulevard. "I
know you think that it's all open white
shirts and gold chains, but it's really
like Times Square," said Stuart. "Full
of drunks, and bums, and people who
just got released from mental in-
stitutions."
Green on Red only played for an hour
and a half, but they were still lots of fun.
Green on Red was the band in Ann Ar-
bor Tuesday.

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Renting a basement
may not be a good deal

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AND WE CAN MAKE YOURS A LOT PRETTIER, FOR A LOT LESS.

(Continued from Page 1)
me up at night."
One Ann Arbor couple recently ex-
perienced the gamut of basement apar-
tment woes, before they moved out
when the unit was cited for 17 violations
of the city's housing code.
According to documents filed with
Student Legal Services, the couple,
whose names are being, withheld as
they can no longer be reached, signed a
12-month lease and moved into their
apartment in September 1982.
THE FIRST MONTH was the only
comfortable one. After a heavy rain in
December, drains in the kitchen,
bathroom, and outside the door backed-
up, and the couple also discovered more
drains underneath their living room
carpet. There were also problems with
insects and poor ventillation.
When the city housing inspector
looked at the site, the violations in-
cluded: low ceilings of six feet in some
places rather than the required seven
feet; drainage problems; the bedroom
did "not meet the requirements of light,
size and ventilation;" more than 50
percent of the apartment was below
ground level, and numerous other
repair problems.
The landlord eventually agreed to
pay the tenants $1,000 in an out-of-court
settlement.
BUT THE APARTMENT was dried
out and rented to other tenants although
some of the code violations were not
corrected.
In a process called a variance, the
city's Housing Inspection Bureau, can
allow landlords to rent out apartments
or houses even though the units do not
strictly meet the city's housing codes.
In a letter to the couple's landlord,
William Yadlosky, supervisor of the
bureau wrote: "Although, technically
the basement apartment does not meet
the requirements of ceiling height and

outside grade, I do not deem the apar-
tment as uninhabitable," Yadlosky
wrote the landlord.
ONE OFFICIAL in the city's building
department, who asked to remain
anonymous, said variances of this kind
are issued routinely. "On paper the
place is legal (but) the unit isn't any
more habitable because it has an ad-
ministrative decree," he said.
In the case of the couple's apartment,
the unit had been inspected several
times, but only in the 1983 inspection
was it cited for the low ceilings and sit-
ting more than 50 percent below
ground.
"Ideally every technical violation is
supposed to be cited and dealt with,"
Yadlosky said, but he said there is a
shortage of inspectors now. The housing
department only has four inspectors
now, compared to nine or 10 in past
years, according to Yadlosky.
ONE OF THE recurring problems
with basement apartments according
to Lipson of Student Legal Services, is.
that they were never meant to be apar-
tments in the first place, and the efforts
to convert them have not been suf-
ficient.
"These units look to the prospective
tenants to be cosmetically nice but as
is often the case, mechanically they are
substandard," he said.
But for those who like it a little cooler
and darker, there is at least one thing
going for basement apartments - the
cost. Many landlords price their
basement units about 10 percent lower,
than their other units.
"The major advantage to living in the
basement is that it is comparatively
cheaper than apartments on the other
levels," said LSA sophomore Simone
Scupi. "The lack of light and colder
temperatures are disadvantages,
though. I would only spend one year
living there," she said,

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