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April 12, 1984 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-04-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Mailer
advises
HIopwood
winners
(Continued from Page 1)
where it came from; it was a gift.
"I WONDER ONCE in a while if the
gods don't just look down and decide
they want a novel written and just
choose the deliverer," he mused.
In summing up the writing prospects
of the student winners, Mailer said that
", nothing lifts our horizons like a bit of
luck or the generosity of the gods."
THE HOPWOOD winners, along with
scattered members of the audience,
took the opportunity to chat with Mailer
in the Rackham Assembly Room after
the awards ceremonies. Mailer
graciously congratulated the winners
and patiently spoke to enamoured fans.
Brenda Flanagan, winner of the
Major Drama award, was honored for
her play, When the Jumbie Bird Calls.
It was the first play from the School of
Education doctoral student. Flanagan,
the mother of three children, began
writing her story of an Islamic
revolution in the Caribbean after she hit
a snag in her dissertation. "I decided to
take a break from my dissertation and
try writing this play," she said. "I
didn't really know anything about
playwriting, but I had a story that wan-
ted to come out," she said.
Flanagan, who was born in Trinidad,
became inspired by her Islamic priest
brother during her last visit to the
Caribbean. Flanagan used a Caribbean
dialect in order to convey the ethnic
flavor of the piece.
200 Million People,
And Only 35,000
Get to Read
mibgan vatI I
SUBSCRIBE NOW
764-0558

Hopwood winners

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, April 12, 1984 - Page 5
Doctors set up care guidelines

Arthur Versluis
Novel --- $2500
Laynie Deutsch
Poetry - $2200
Alyson Hagy
Short Story - $2200
Brenda Flanagan
Drama -$2000
Kimberly Kafka
Short Story - $1500
Joseph Matuzak
Poetry -$1100
Jane Kernicky
Essay -$1000
Judith Kirscht
Essay -1000
Kathryn Crawley
Short Story - $1000
Laura Kasischke
Poetry -1000
Drama - $1000
Paul Grams
Drama -$800
Igor Levin
Drama - $800
Julie Bernstein
Drama - $800
Nan Parrish
Drama -- $800
Kenneth Jakubowski
Essay -$800

Maureen Megerian
Essay -$800o
Dennis Harvey
Fiction - $800
Bradford Parks
Fiction-$800
Joseph Shea
Fiction -$800
Adam Davis
Poetry -$800
Wendy Martin
Poetry -$800
Dana MeCrossin
Poetry -$800
Sebastian Rotella
Drama - $600
Mark Bransdorfer
Essay - $600
Carole Bernstein
Essay -$600
Ted Lardner
Poetry - $600
Charles Schulman
Drama -$400
Deborah Montwori
Essay -$400
Judith Lantz
Fiction - $40U

BOSTON (AP) - New guidelines by a
team of prominent doctors say it is
ethical to withhold drugs and
sometimes even food and water from
mentally deranged elderly patients who
are hopelessly ill, as long as they are
kept comfortable while they die.
The report, published in today's New
England Journal of Medicine, was
prepared by doctors who gathered at
Harvard Medical School. It is intended
to provide criteria for physicians who
must make life-and-death decisions for
gravely ill patients.
IN GENERAL, the researchers con-
tend that doctors must always obey the
patients' own wishes, but they say
aggressive treatment is wronger if it
only prolongs a painful death. Such
treatment decisions are especially dif-
ficult if patients are too sick or
deranged to say how much care they
want.

"Severly and irreversibly demented
patients need only care given to make
them comfortable," the guidelines say.
"If a patient rejects food and water by
mouth, it is ethically permissible to
withholdnutrition and hydration water
artifically administered by vein or
gastric tube."
They said doctors can withhold an-
tibiotics for pneumonia and medicine
for other diseases unless the care is
needed to keep the patient comfortable.
THE GUIDELINES were drawn up
at a meeting chaired by Dr. Daniel
Federman, former president of the
American College of Physicians.
Among those attending were doctors
from Hennepin County Medical Center
in Minneapolis, the University of
Virginia Medical Center, the Mayo
Clinic and the medical schools at Har-
vard, the University of Pittsburgh,
Johns Hopkins and the University of
Texas.

"The idea was that if a group of
prominent physicians took the lead in
suggesting what is possible that these
principles might become accepted
among the general physician
population," said Dr. Sidney Wanzer of
Emerson Hospital in Concord, Mass.,
who wrote up the group's conclusions
for publication.
Wanzer said he expects the recom-
mendations for withholding food and
water from deranged patients to be
controversial, even though such
decisions are made daily in nursing
homes.
"These poor, pathetic beings just go
on and on, and people have felt uncom-
fortable in the past about not giving in-
travenous fluids or antibiotics or
nasogastric feeding if they quit desiring
this spontaneously," he said in an in-
terview. "and yet we feel that it is
ethical not to push ahead with those
things."

In addition to the Hopwood Awards, two other honors were awarded to
student writers. Nan Parrish won the Kasdan Scholarship in Creative
Writing, and the Jeffery L. Weisberg Memorial Prize in Freshman Poetry
was awarded to Mary^Jaklevic.

STUDENTS- DO YOU NEED A FULL TIME SUMMER JOB?
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U of M STUDENT AND FACULTY/STAFF
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Contact Debbie Dioguardi at the Michigan Daily
764-0554

WHAT'S THE CATCH?
You must be aggressive, willing to learn, be an above average
student and enjoy talking on the phone. Call our toll free
number 1-800-621-6426 to set up an interview date while in
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Ask for Mr. Davis when calling.

A

Special

Invitation

Wayne State University
U-M Students
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