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April 12, 1984 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1984-04-12

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The Michigan Daily -Thursday, April 12, 1984 - Page 7

wcOt3 B 1 EN TICf4O fPcTURS T3yCECI

The Band plays on

714E TOLL
L& CLQ(tIE

A 5RIVEN MORNING: NEMB~ERT THE
TROLL AWOKE TO FIWD) HE WAs NO
LO.CN&EtR MIRVD &TWAT A CROWvWAS
L/-k/6H ICKArIATMON T"-IE LEtD&E -%-
AIva ah /

r

THE RAIN$ .TH-AT HAD SLOSRED AL-L 71-f-
Pe'EVIDU~S WEEK H-AP SPOIll-D THE CHAIRS
AND EVEN4IW THRE \AAsA PULPLE
Or PW5S1ifATI >N( ifK*et THE
1TR6IVE~5A~Tc5R USED TO 51A'*P.
6 6 U t SCOV ' Y Ef!'SA.
j - ARGJ CB- F-E WOX)LPI
E.?LUNCH AT DRAKE5.

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A TgEN PWAFIE P 15Y
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11

(-AWK AND LNOU E .
SEVER4t.. ME w t T14 NO cOL-
LARS CHASED TE 1ROW& .
-NRI~EATE'AJED TO SWAT H (M
WITH T10<~5. NC4 EScAFtP-

-- -- Second Chance is quite a bit smaller
By Joseph Kraus than most of the arenas that he is used
- - --- to filling.
Rick Danko, bassist, was certainly
T HE LAST Waltz was supposed the most well-preserved of the group.
to be it. Matching his jet-black hair to the
Reportedly, The Band, one of the others' gray, and sporting a "Nobody
most successful bands of the '70s, broke for President in 1984" t-shirt, he
up because they didn't feel they could seemed at least 20 years younger. Un-
continue to record at the level of quality fortunately, his voice hasn't held up so
they had established. And that was well as might have been hoped, but he
what the Last Waltz was all about - get certainly gave his all and on a few
out while there's still something left. numbers seemed to recapture his old
Well, the good news is that The Band throat.
still has more than a little something Danko's bass playing was fine, but
left. when he switched to guitar, he seemed
They made it very clear Tuesday to use it more as a showpiece than an
night that they are professional instrument. The big key, though was
musicians of the highest caliber, but stage presence, and Danko more than
even more than that, they had a good delivered. For most of the evening the
time just playing some great songs. others were trapped behind drum sets
They have aged. There is no doubt of or keyboards, but Danko did enough
that, but each has grown in a different jumping around and hand waving for
way. them all.
Leven Helm, drummer, mandolin Richard Manuel was another who
player, harmonicat and singer, was in couldn't be ,recognized from the old
superb form. Doing less of the drum- albums, but ideas of "over-the-hill"
ming and singing than the albums stopped then and there. If anything, he
would lead one to expect, Helm excelled has improved as a musician, and he
on the mandolin and harmonica. proved his absolute versatility by
Although his features have aged beyond playing two or three different types of
recognizibility from the old album keyboards as well as playing close to
covers, his voice seemed brand new half of the drum numbers. His voice
and he used it to great affect on most of was a little weak, but he put in more
the highlight songs than enough emotion to make up for it.
Probably the most amazing thing Keyboardist and saxophonist Garth
about his performance, though, was Hudson was the show's ace in the hole.
that he seemed to be enjoying himself Although he spent most of the night
- even though he's been in the business behind his keyboard in a background
for over 20 years, and even though the type of spot, he would step into the
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- ~
/L
------'---

A GCyW~PcFTAX~I W1EN4T BY,. -T"EY, L- ~SEEM -
EpLIKTHEYVE=RE HL\VIN &COP TIMET.
Tht-tj, FR;;OM A(PDS Fi4 XT A \TRCT HEi
I3AJT 1T E W4NS A TPAJ( / 7-ANO wVksl
- '\' T*H/0Ps U-

spotlight at irregular intervals - not so
often to make it a cliche, but often
enough to make it a vital part of the
show - and absolutely light up the
stage with his sax. He gave the whole
show a shot in the arm, and when he'd
sit back down, the rest of the gang
seemed to play all the harder.
Robbie Robertson's guitar playing
chores were taken over ably by Earl
Cates, and the rest of the Cates
Brothers, who also served as opening
act, added all around instrumental and
even vocal support.
The Cates opening set lasted about 25
minutes, and if the band following them
had been any less good than The Band,
they might have gotten an encore, but
as it was they got to show their stuff
during the main set.
It was a great concert. The Band did
most of their great songs, songs like
"King Harvest," "Rag -Mama Rag,"
"Stagefright" and "The Weight," but
not all of them - notably omitting "Up
on Cripple Creek."
Looking back on it, nothing more can
be said. The Band was, and still is, one
of the greatest American rock bands of
them all.
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* Communication era is an open book

be'

558

WASHINGTON (AP) - Despite the
.tompetition of television, more than
;half of American adults read books, ac-
cording to a study released yesterday,
'and one reader in three manages to go
through a book a week.
"In the age of electronic entertain-
ment and personal computers, books
are thriving," said the study, conducted
for the Book Industry Study Group, a
non-profit organization representing
publishers, book manufacturers, sup-
pliers, wholesalers, -retailers,
librarians and others in the book
business. The study was based on 1,961
hour-long interviews last October.
The percentage of Americans who
say they read at least an occasional.
book has barely changed in five years,
,the study said. It is 56 percent now and
,was 55 percent in 1978, when a similar
survey was conducted.
But the distribution of readers in the
population has changed, the report
notes, and it terms the trend "distur-
bing."
BIOLOGICAL
ANTHROPOLOGY
Introduction 161 (Div. 318)

Heavy readers are reading more
books and light readers fewer. And
young people aren't reading as much as
the young used to.
The proportion of heavy readers has
doubled, from 18 percent of all book
readers five years ago to 35 percent.
today.
Heavy readers are those who claim to
have read 26 or more books in the last
six months - at least one a week, on
average. They said they spent 14 hours
a week reading books.
The heavy readers account for 75
percent of all books read and buy about
half of the books they read, borrowing
the others from friends or libraries.
They also read more magazines than

non-book readers, but fewer
newspapers, and are likely to be
moviegoers, to subscribe to cable and
pay television and to watch public TV
than non book-readers.
But the study found that book reading
has declined among the young. In 1978,
three-quarters of those aged 16 to 21
said they read books, and that's now
down to 63 percent. The proportion of
young people who confine their reading
to newspapers and magazines grew
from 9 percent to 29 percent.
People who said they read 10 to 25
books within the last six months ac-
counted for 26 percent of all book
readers, about the same as the propor-
tion in 1978.

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