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January 10, 1984 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1984-01-10

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IN BRIEF

Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, January 10, 19b4
U.S. plans more Salvadoran aid

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Reagan administration
is planning to seek an additional $140 million in
military assistance for El Salvador this year, the
largest single weapons aid request yet for the
beleaguered Salvadoran army, officials said yester-
day.
If approved by Congress, the new proposal would
push total U.S. military aid totthe Salvadoran army to
more than $200 million for 1984. By comparison, the
United Staes provided $81.3 million in military aid
last year.
ADMINISTRATION officials, who spoke on the con-
dition they not be identified, said the new aid package
would include El Salvador's first large troop-
carrying helicopters, to improve the army's mobility.
Last week, leftist Salvadoran guerrillastdestroyed a
-key bridge, limiting the army's ability to reach the
eastern third of the country.
"If you agree that they need more mobility, they
can use itanow, not two years from now" said one
- senior official, explaihing the proposed large jump in
military aid.

Meanwhile President Reagan plans to ignore a
reported recommendation by the Kissinger Com-
mission on Central America linking future military
aid for El Salvador to improved human rights per-
formance in that country, presidential spokesman
Larry Speakes said.
UNTIL LAST summer, Congress had insisted that
the administration certify improved human rights
performance at six month intervals as a condition for
continued military assistance. But last November,
Reagan vetoed a congressional amendment to extend
that requirement.
When aid was tied to the certification, Speakes
said, "We thought it didn't serve any purpose
because each time one of these reports came due the
right and the left rose up and tried to influence the
report by intimidation."
In a December visit to El Salvador, Vice President
George Bush told Salvadoran leaders that the ad-
ministration was prepared to seek a substantial in-
crease in aid if army officers linked to rightist death

squads were expelled from the country. Bush set
Tuesday as a deadline for action.
LAST WEEK, administration officials said they
were pleased that three of the officers cited by Bush
have been transferred to posts in other countries.
Congress is considered likely to trim the new
request amid growing concern that the Salvadoran
army, plagued by poor morale and increasingly on
the defensive, is less in need of equipment than better
leadership.
The proposed $140 million military aid increase
must still receive formal approval from Reagan
before it is sent to Congress, probably next month,
the officials said. Congress has already approved
$64.8 million in military aid for El Salvador this year,
with 30 percent - or about $20 million - withheld
pending a verdict in the case against five Salvadoran
national guardsmen accused of slaying four
American churchwomen in December 1980.
The largest previous request for military aid to El
Salvador was for $110 million a year ago. Congress
approved half of that.

U.S. issues revised 'Baby Doe' regulations

WASHINGTON (AP) - The Reagan
administration revised its "Baby Doe"
regulations yesterday to give special
hospital review committees primary
responsibility for assuring medical at-
tention for handicapped infants, and
make the government "protector of last
resort."
Health and Human Services
Secretary Margaret Heckler and
Surgeon General Everett Koop, a
pediatric surgeon for more than 30
years, announced the new version of the
much-debated rules, which will go into
effect 30 days after they are published.
THE REVISED regulations are in-

tended to strike a balance between the
views of the medical community op-
posing federal intervention and those of
some advocates of the disabled and an-
ti-abortion groups which support an ac-
tivist federal role.
"We have traveled a long and con-
troversial road in order to translate this
administration's commitment to serve
as a protector of last resort for those
children into public policy," Heckler
told reporters.
"We hope that the issuance of these
new rules will foster a new process of
cooperative efforts and sensible ap-
proaches to advance the principle that

life-and-death medical treatment
decisions for infants be based on infor-
med judgment of medical benefits and
risks, and not on stereotypes and
prejudices against handicapped per-
sons," she said.
THE NEW RULES accept a proposal
advanced by the medical community
under which hospitals voluntarily
would establish infant care review
committees to tackle tough decisions
about the kind of treatment to be given
handicapped newborn babies.
The regulations suggest that the
committees include medical personnel,
an attorney, a member of the com-

EVEN STRAIGHT A'S CAN'T
HELP IF YOU FLUNK TUITION.

munity and a representative of a
disability group.
The earlier version of the regulations,
which three medical groups suc-
cessfully challenged in court, called for
posting placards prominently in
hospitals with a warning against
discriminatory denial of food or
medical attention to handicapped in-
fants.
The placards also would carry a toll-
free hotline number where anyone
could report suspected cases.
Koop said the hotline will remain in
operation. But the government now
wants hospitals to post notices 5 inches
by 7 inches in places where hospital
staffs congregate. These notices will
carry the phone numbers of the infant
care review committee in the hospital,
state child protection officials and the
government's hotline number.
Koop said that wherever federal of-
ficials feel the need to inquire about the
treatment being given a handicapped
infant, they will make requests for in-
formation first through the hospital's
infant care review committee. Koop
said he expects most hospitals to
establish such committees.

Complied from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Jordan's parliament approves
amendments on elections
AMMAN, Jordan - Jordan's parliament yesterday approved constitution-
al amendments permitting election of representatives for the occupied West
Bank in a move that could lead to a breakthrough in Middle East peace
negotiations.
Meeting for the first time in nearly a decade, the lower house and senate
voted unanimously to amend the constitution to allow elections of a new
parliament with West Bank representation.
The move could presage an attempt by King Hussein to represent the West
Bank's.1 million Palestinians in a new peace initiative, with or without the.
badly divided Palestine Liberation Organization, Western diplomats said.
Under the amendments, elections would be held for 30 representatives
from the East Bank, Jordan proper. They would elect 15 representatives
from the West Bank, who in turn would elect another 15 from the occupied
territory.
Previously, Jordanian law required electioned in the East and West Banks
to be held simultaneously out with the West Bank under Israeli control all
elections in Jordan were barred.
Court lets Detroit quotas stand
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court spurned a Reagan administration
request yesterday- and refused to review racial quotas used to promote
police officers in Detroit - a system white officers say is "reverse
discrimination."
The administration had urged the court to use Detroit's program for
promoting police lieutenants as a vehicle for reviewing public employers'
use of racial quotas. Giving absolute preferences in hiring or promotion to
people who have not actually suffered bias is unconstitutional, the ad-
ministration argued.
The justices' response was to let stand, without comment, a ruling
allowing the city to use the quota system.
Detroit's affirmative action program, adopted in 1974, calls for promoting
an equal number of black and white police lieutenants to ma e up for
historic exclusion of blacks.
Five white police lieutenants passed over for promotion.
Navy wins antenna fac'iity land
LANSING - Opponents of Project Elf yesterday said the U.S. Navy last
month won a court-approved condemnation of state land for the antenna
facility - a move that apparently squelches some attempts to stop the
development.
A Navy official later confirmed that the military had won U.S. District
Court approval of the condemnation of state-owned land in the Upper Penin-
sula, but said the action was a "fairly simple" move merely to protect the
Navy's title.
Commander Mark Baker, who called the action "a friendly condem-
nation," said it does not affect private property.
Stop Project ELF spokesman David Merritt accused the Navy of using
"Gestapo-like tactics" regarding the 892 acres of land. Merritt said the Navy
action would, if it remains unchallenged, thwart at least one suit against the
state as well as pending anti-ELF legislation.
Five Central American nations
finalize modified pact for peace
PANAMA CITY, Panama - Five Central American foreign ministers have
agreed to a peace plan that seeks to end violence in the volatile region
through free elections and reductions of arms and foreign military advisers.
The agreement reached Sunday is a modification of a proposal submitted
two weeks ago by the Contadora nations of Venezuela, Panama, Mexico and
Colombia. It capped a year of mediation efforts by those countries, who first
met in January 1983 on Contadora island off the Panamanian coast.
The pact calls for an inventory of arms, bases and soldiers in each of the
five Central American countries - Costa Rica, Nicaragua, El Salvador,
Honduras and Guatemala - and the subsequent control and reduction of
these to bring "a reasonable balance of power in the region."
The military advisers issue requires a census in each country and adoption
of a calendar for reduction "with a view towards elimination" of the ad-
visers.
Dropped from the Contadora proposal was, among other things, a call for a
moratorium on new arms acquisitions after Feb 29.
Commissions are to be set up by the end of January to prepare studies and
recommendations.
Rebels bomb Nicaraguan port
U.S.-backed rebels claimed yesterday that their forces mined Nicaragua's
main Pacific port and the Nicaraguan government radio charged that
guerrillas planes and speedboats bombarded another Nicaraguan port for
the fifth straight day.
The government's Voz de Nicaragua charged warplanes "left the base of
Amapala and El Tigre" in Honduras and rocketed the port of Potosi twice
Sunday afternoon, causing damage but no injuries.
The attack started with reconnaissance flights by two planes that fired
flares. Later, an unidentified plane accompanied tgwo "Pirana" speedboats
that fired on the port and the customs building, the Voz de Nicaragua said.
Rebels of the Nicaraguan Democratic Force, the FDN, have taken respon-
sibility for the daily attacks on Potosi and other small ports nearby since
Wednesday.

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Tuesday, January 10, 1984
Vol. XCIV-No. 82
(ISSN 0745-967X)
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
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