100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 08, 1983 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-12-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

4

ARTS
Thursday, December 8, 1983

Page 6

The Michigan Daily

Entertainment world: trials, tribulations

Olivier ill
LONDON (AP) - Actor Laurence
Olivier, 76, underwent a two-hour kid-
ney operation Wednesday and is in
stable condition at London's St. Thomas
Hospital, his agent said.
"I suppose any operation on the kid-
ney and on a man of his age is a major
one," lord Olivier's agent, Laurence
Evans, told The Associated Press. "But
we're very optimistic. The operation
was successful." Olivier was admitted to
the hospital a week ago and surgeons
decided over the weekend they would
have to operate.
In October, Olivier finished filming
for the British television version of
John Fowles' novel "The Ebony
Tower."
Too, too hot
WASHINGTON -(AP) - Comedian
Bob Hope may entertain U.S. Marines
and sailors stationed in Lebanon during

the Christmas holiday, Navy and
United Service Organizations officials
said Wednesday. USO spokesman Paul
Regaski said that "Bob Hope is con-
sidering it," but final details have not
been worked out.
Navy officials said Hope, 80, had of-
fered in a letter to travel to the Beirut
area to entertain American servicemen
- a Christmas tradition he began'
during World War II. Pentagon sources
who spoke only on the condition that
they not be identified said that if Hope
makes the trip this year he probably
will not land in Lebanr jut will give
his shows aboard Navy ships offshore,
with Marines being ferried out to the
U.S. fleet. "It is too hot in the Beirut
area for him to go there," said one
source.
Koppel halved
NEW YORK (AP) - "Nightline,"
ABC News' late-night program an-
chored by Ted Koppel, will be cut from
an hour to 30 minutes Feb. 20, Roone
Arledge, president of ABC News, an-

nounced Tuesday at ABC's Board of
Governors meeting in Honolulu.
Arledge said the reason was to achieve
the greatest number of stations which
would carry the program live. In its
one-hour format, "Nightline" suffered
lower ratings as dozens of affiliates
delayed the program.
"Nightline" began as a 30-minute
show, but it went to an hour earlier this
year when its follow-up news program,
"The Last Word," was cut from one
hour to 30 minutes and was later can-
celled.

His better half
NEW YORK (AP) - Fonzie in Drag?
Playwright Harvey Fierstein has
reportedly asked Henry Winkler, best
known as the leather-jacketed, tough-
talking Fonzie on television's "Happy
Days," to play the transvestite lead in
Fierstein's Torch Song Trilogy.
Winkler and Fierstein have met
several times, the Daily News reported
Wednesday. "Winkler told Harvey that
the TV show has been cancelled.
Winkler loves Torch Song and wants to
do it," the newspaper quoted a
spokesman for the play as saying. The
spokesman, who was not identified,
said Winkler probably would join the
play's national company and even-
tually join it on Broadway.
Home again
.STOCKHOLM, Sweden (AP) -
Director Ingmar Bergman has retur-
ned "home" to the stage of the Royal
Dramatic Theater of Stockholm, from
which he was removed by police eight
years ago in a tax dispute. Bergman,
65, called his cast to a first meeting at
the stage Tuesday for a production of
Shakespeare's King Lear.
In the spring of 1975, Internal
Revenue agents sent police to fetch him

at the theater, suspecting him of tax*
evasion.
Bergman suffered from a nervous
breakdown and went into exile in
Munich, West Germany, where he
resumed his directing career. He
visited Sweden and spent summers at
his island home, but had no major
engagements in Sweden until now. He'll
return to Germany next year. ie told
reporters the Royal Dramatic Theater
is one "I have grown up with for
decades, been director and chief at and
which I love. It is a theater for a
lifetime...."
Off the hook
LONDON (AP) - Former Beatle
Paul McCartney says a paternity suit
filed against him by a West German
woman "has turned out to be a com-
plete fake."
"I knew it all along because she said
we knew each- other intimately for
years, but I couldn't remember her fir-
st name. My memory's not that bad,"
McCartney was quoted as saying in an
interview published Wednesday in a
British weekly magazine.

Erika Huebers, 41, has filed suit
against McCartney in West Berlin
demanding child support for her 20-
year-old daughter Bettina, whom she
claims was fathered by McCartney
when he was singing with the Beatles it
Hamburg.
McCartney has denied the charge an
taken blood tests he says prove he
couldn't be the father.
Cable collection
NEW YORK (AP) - So what's wrong
with putting Beethoven and Foggy on
the same cable-TV channel? The won-
der is that no one thought of the Arts &
Entertainment Network before now.
If it sounds like the marriage of
Hearst-ABC's Alpha Repertory
Television Service and RCA's dormant
Entertainment Channel, it is. The two
parties were expected to sign the
merger papers today. And it means,
starting Feb. 1, a mix of classical
music, like Beethoven's Concerto No: 1
in C, and comedy, like "The Last of the
Summer Wine," featuring Clegg, Coin-
po and Foggy, the three elderly gents
who get involved in extremely unlikely
situations. There's more, of course, t9
the new station than just that. Drama
theater, the cinema, music, opera, dan-
ce, art, poetry and literature will all be
presented.
What's behind the merger? Survival,
no doubt, in the increasingly chancy
world of cable TV. And that seems to
demand a lineup of shows that will ap-
peal to as-many people as possible,
while attracting advertisers interested
in a so-called "upscale" audience. It
might be Wilkie Collins' "Woman in
White" one evening, with "Bach Goes A
Fast" the next, "A Midsummer Night's
Dream" the third night, and maybe
yBritish comedy shows "Two's Com-
pany" and "Kelly Monteith" the fourth.

ANN ARBOR1:1]

_ __,_ _ __ _. 1

SEE BOTH "D.C. CAB" AND
"NEVER SAY NEVER"
FRI. 12/9/83 at 6:50 or 9:05 P.M.

it

IL

Z INDIVIDUAL THEATRES
5h Ave of Liberty 761.9700

MAJOR STUDIO SNEAK PREVIEW
TOMORROW AT 9:05 P.M.
Starring:
MR. T, IRENE CARA,
MAX GAIL.& GARY BUSEY
Their cars were broken.
Their company was almost out of business.
' And even the drivers were wrecks.
Then they met Albert Hockenberry,
a small-town boy with a big dream...
that, despite these impossible odds,
they could make it.
And now, no one -not even the sleazy
commissioner nor the crooked competition -
better stand in their way.
k)S
They won't stop
'til they get to the top.
(R) .

Winkler
... dresses up

1983 Soph Show
GODSPELL

December 8th and 10th at 8:00 p.m.
December 9th at 10:00 p.m.
Mendelssohn Theater
TICKETS are $5.00 and are available

McCartney
... not the father

Tricky Dickies

at the Michigan Union
and at the door

Ticket

Office

By Larry Dean
IT'LL BE A HOT NIGHT at Joe's Star
Lounge on December 8 when the
Dickies, another California export, take
to the stage with their zany antics and a
whole new line-up.
Well, "whole new" isn't exactly the
truth. Guitarist Stan Lee and vocalist
Leonard Phillips form the nucleus of
the Dickies, as they did in the far-flung
days of yore when they headlined at the
Masque and the Whiskey - two of
L.A.'s hottest "punk" venues. Back
then, the band was a must-see for those
endeared to on-stage decadence in the
Zappa vein - lots of unpredictability
from Phillips in a volatile theatre of the
absurd revolving around crunching in-
strumental silliness.
There has been nary a peep from the
Dickies since keyboardist/saxophonist
Chuck Wagon died in 1981. Wagon's
death caused some tremors to infiltrate
the groups' good humor, and nearly a
year was spent in mundane duties such
as picking new management, new
members, and in divvying up the bucks.
However, these irksome occurrences
weren't enough to stifle the Dickies'
ideal. Things got together, and Lee and
Phillips went into the studio to cut some
new tracks. These included a romantic
ballad, "She's A Hunchback," and a
new trashing of a contemporary rock
albatross, Zep's "Communication
Breakdown." This handy adaptation is
earnestly displayed alongside their

versions of "The Sounds of Silence,"
"Nights In White Satin," and the an-
themish "Banana Splits Theme Song,"
all which remain true to the Dickies' ar-
tistic declarations.
To go along with these new tunes,
some more studio time was booked, and
the band cranked out a few more tunes
to constitute an eight-song EP. To whet
your appetite, these include "Pretty
Please Me," "Wagon Train," "If Stuart
Could Talk," and the title track,
another ambitious thematic piece en-
tiled "Stukas Over Disneyland."
The Dickies are not your average
L.A. pop band; they sure don't fit in this
neo-psychedelia mode that has
everyone drooling these days! What
they do is return us to the halcyon times
when pop music was synonymous with
fun - and that's what they should be:
fun, spunky, and gregarious. Be in the
mood for the Dickies, Thursday night.
Since the Daily ceases publication on
Friday, a word has to be put in for
another band journeying through A-
squared and Joe's, specifically, on the
14th - the Neats. This Boston quartet
has played in town priorly, and
generated a good response from the
audience-at-hand. The music? Boppy
pop with the proverbial edge. See 'em
before packing it all up and going home
to wherever for holiday cheer - con-
sider both the Dickies and the Neats
pre-cheer, all tempa-cheer, anything
but Blue Cheer! And have a great new
year.

S
U
G
A
R

E
L
B
R
A
T
O

$14800
(Double Occupancy
Tax Included)
Includes -
E THREE NIGHTS LODGING
* 1 DINNER FOR TWO IN
BOGIE'S RESTAURANT
* 2 "SNACK -SACKS"FOR
THE GAME
TRANSPORTATION TO
GAME ADDITIONAL-
$25.00 Per Person
ADD. NIGHTS $35.00 s/d
OFFER GOOD DEC. 31 - JAN. 2

1I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan