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December 08, 1983 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-12-08

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The Michigan Daily - Thursday, December 8, 1983 - Page 5

Baker may leave

White

House for baseball field

WASHINGTON (AP)-President
Reagan wants him to stay, but White
House chief of staff James Baker III of-
fered no more than an underhanded
reply yesterday to reports that he' s in
line to become commissioner of
r3 baseball.
Caught by reporters at a ceremony
honoring the king and queen of Nepal,
Baker was asked: "Are you going to
play ball?" And his only response was
a underhand sweep of his pitching
arm-as if softball, not hardball, is his
game.
REAGAN'S CHIEF spokesman,
Larry Speakes, was just as
unenlightening, advancing an official
no comment spiced by wisecracks-as
in "He already chews tobacco, if that's
helpful."
If Baker does wind up serving the
national pastime rather than the
presidency, he wouldn't be the first to
jump from the Potomac to the playing
field. A.B. "Happy" Chandler, once the
Democratic governor of Kentucky, left
the Senate in 1945 to become baseball's
commissioner.
And Lawrence O'Brien, the com-
missioner of the National Basketball
Association, was a key adviser to
presidents John Kennedy and Lyndon
Johnson as well as Democratic national
AP Photo chairman.
SPEAKES, ASKED about reports
from the major league meetings in
uts," died in a Minneapolis Mashville, Tenn., that Baker was the
torof a juvenile detention leading candidate for the job being
vacated by Bowie Kuhn, read a formal
Haitians jobs

'The truth is there's been a mixup. He's go-
ing to replace Billy Martin as manager of
the (New York) Yankees.'
- Larry Speakes
presidential spokesman

statement: ''In the past three years,
there have been several press reports
of job changes for Mr. Baker, and we
didn't choose to comment on them then,
and we don't intend to start now.''
But reporters pointed out that on
other occasions, when Baker was men-
tioned for jobs ranging from U.N. am-
bassador to the Senate seat of Texas
Republican John Tower, Speakes did,
in fact, deny such reports. Still,
Speakes stuck to his formal statement,
adding: "This is what Baker wanted us
to say, and this is what we're saying...
He did add that he already chews
tobacco, if xthat's helpful in gettin' the
job."
Speakes also said Baker was not
unhappy in his job and that he had not
discussed leaving with Pr-esident
Reagan. Does Reagan want him to
stay? "I'm sure he does," said
Speakes.
REAGAN, WHEN asked about the
reports, said, "I was as surprised as
anyone to read that."
At another point, Speakes joked,
"The truth is there's been a mixup.

He's going to replace Billy Martin as
manager of the (New York) Yankees.
"The main reason is he wants to be in
the television commercials. The press
office will begin accepting orders for
World Series tickets the first of the
year. I have a statement from (Baker
deputy) Dick Darman, who is from
Massachusetts, who says, 'This could
be good for the (Boston) Red Sox.' "
IF BAKER WERE to take the post,
which would involve considerable lob-
bying in Washington as well as
mediating disputes between owners in
the major league, he could draw on
many of the same strengths that have
served him through three years of
political wrangling in his present job.
Regarded as a strong administrator
within the White House, Baker has built
a reputation around town as a
pragmatist skilled at shaping consen-
sus and compromise on complex,
divisive issues. His intervention in the
struggle to save the Social Security.
system last year was indicative of his
ability to forge an agreement when
other negotiators had tried and failed.

{Goodbye Charlie Brown
Charlie Brown, the inspiration for Charles Schulz' hapless pitcher in the comic strip "Peant
hospice Monday night after a seven-year bout with cancer. Brown, 57, was program direc
center.
AIDS scare costs

MIAMI (AP) - Many Haitians are suffering from
job discrimination, some even being fired, because of
unjustified fears that they can spread the deadly
disease AIDS, community leaders say.
"Us Haitians, we are poor, we are black, we don't
have the power to deal with the publicity," said Ringo
Cayard, who helps run a family grocery store in
Miami's Little Haiti.
"BY CREATING a stigma on this community, a lot
of people are losing jobs or having difficulty in fin-
ding jobs," said Dr. Jean-Claude Desgranges, a
'spokesman for the Haitian Coalition on AIDS.
Of 2,753 cases of acquired immune deficiency syn-
drome reported to the federal Centers for Disease
Control as of Nov. 15, 4.8 percent were among
Haitians. Homosexuals made up 72 percent of those
cases and intravenous drug abusers an additional 17
percent. Researchers say the disease, which breaks
dow# the 7bgdy's immune system, appears to be
spread by seicual cont.c, contaminated meedles and
blood transfusions, not casual contact.
Haitian physicians argue there is insufficient

medical evidence to classify all Haitians as a high-
risk group. They say Haitian culture deeply disap-
proves of homosexuality and drug abuse, making
Haitian AIDS victims unlikely to admit to either ac-
tivity.
THE PHYSICIANS, represented by the 60-member
Haitian Medical Association, also claim that un-
sanitary conditions in Haiti, such as use of un-
sterilized neeldes, could make the AIDS problem
worse among Haitians there than in the United
States.
"There are far more whites that have it," Cayard
said Tuesday.
"But it's very convenient to say, 'the Haitians, they
have AIDS.'
"IT'S A TREMENDOUS problem," he said.
"People are losing their jobs, people have been told,
'I don't want you here because you might have
AIDS.' "
Dr. James Curran, director of the AWSitask force
at the CDC, said Haitians are being kept as a high-
risk AIDS category because "the figures sort of.

speak for themselves in the sense that they pointed
out that 5 percent of all AIDS cases have been of
people born in Haiti." He said fewer than 20 percent of
the Haitian AIDS victims are homosexuals or drug
abusers, other high-risk categories.
But he added, "Any implication that these people
pose substantial increases of transmitting AIDS to
others is misconstrued."
CAYARD SAID Haitians were badly hit by job
discrimination because many work in service in-
dustries and have close contact with people or
products, such as hotels, restaurants, and in
agriculture.
No figures were available on the number of
Haitians who might have lost jobs or been denied new
positions because of the AIDS scare. But officials say
the publicity aggravatged an already severe unem-
ployment problem.
The unemployment rate among, the more than
20,000 Haitians in Miami's Little Haiti section is 27
percent, more than twice the rate among other blacks
in Dade County and four times the rate for the county.

'f4
All

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Film hurts veterans image
(Continued from Page 2) ficial who represents the National
whether the health of servicemen was Veterans Task Force on Agent Orange
jeopardized by the herbicide sprayed in on the panel, said the videotape con-
Vietnam and urges the VA staff to show veys the message, "well everything's
professional, compassionate concern to just fine. We're not having any
worried veterans until answers are in. problems. Everybody's doing just
But after viewing the tape Tuesday, good; just keep ahead with what you're
members of the VA's Advisory Com- doing."
mittee on Health-Related Effects of AS FOR stereotyping, said Walkup:
Herbicide said it takes too rosy a view "Uniformly, every Vietnam veteran (in
of the problem and of the VA's handling the tape) is either bearded and over-
of worried veterans. They said it rein- weight, bearded and disheveled, in a T-
forces a stereotype of Vietnam shirt, a minority person-things which
veterans as failures. say that these are not our kind of
Hugh Walkup, a Seattle welfare of- people."
Sales slow for tour tickets

panel says
Frederick Mullen, who represents
Paralyzed Veterans of America, said
the tape "portrays the Vietnam veteran
in a denigrating way. We've asked that
it be pulled immediately, that they
cease and desist showing it."
"As of this moment there are no plans
to scrap the videotape," Donna St.
John, a VA spokesman, said.
"WE HAD ASKED to be allowed to
adit this film, but by the time we knew
they were releasing it, they had already
released it," said Mullen, who chairs
the. subcommittee of the advisory
committee that reviewed the tape.

uau-
restaurant and bar

Small Computer, Big Deal.

(Continued from Page 1)
morrow is the last day to sign up for that
tour, and estimated that there are
about 200 spaces still available.
Despite the lag in package tour sales,
single ticket business is high, said
ticket manager Al Renfrew. The
C Jniversity was allotted 12,500 tickets
r the game, and Renfrew said his of-
'lice will probably be sold out of the $20.50
tickets in another day or two.
Renfrew could not say how many of the
tickets went to students, but a

spokeswoman from the ticket office
said the number is "very low."
Students are guaranteed a ticket to
the game, but Renfrew said to get
priority seating students, faculty, and
staff must have their applications in by
tomorrow.
Most fans have chosen to provide
their own transportation and pass up
the packaged tours, but local travel
agents say airline tickets to New
Orleans are scarce; both Boersma
Travel and Faber Travel say they are
almost sold out.

7 HAIRCUTTERS
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11

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