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December 08, 1983 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-12-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Michigan Hockey
vs. Ferris State
Friday, Saturday, 7:30 p.n.
Yost Ice Arena
The Michigan Daily

SPORTS

Michigan Ticket Department
is no longer accepting
applications for
Sugar Bowl Tickets

Thursday, December 8, 1983

Page 7

Penn State pins matmen

SCORES

College Basketball
Louisville 79, Iowa 58
Duke 82. Ohio U. 63
Wayne St. 67, Orchard Lake St. Marys 48
N.C. State 82, W. Carolina 61
Wisconsin 90, N. Illinois 68
Northwestern 40, Notre Dame 36

NBA
Philadelphia 133, Denver 128
Cleveland 106, Atlanta 92
Boston 100, Indiana 95
NHL
Minnesota 7, Detroit 2
N.Y. Rangers 7, Washington 5

By GARY EFFMAN
Pound for pound the wolverine is
believed to be the most ferocious
animal in the North American wild. On
the mats last night, however, the
Wolverine wrestlers met Penn State
and though proving themselves no
pussycats, they simply were not
ferocious enough for the Nittany Lions.
When the grappling was done, the Lions
were on top, 24-16.
The match started as would be expec-
ted when two excellent teams meet
head to head. Penn State's Carl
DeStefanis (118 lbs.) drew first blood
for the Lions, winning a superior
decision, 18-5 over Michigan's William
Waters. Michigan All-American Joe
McFarland (126 lbs.) returned the
favor with 'another superior decision,
29-9, gaining the five points for a
greater-than-12-point victory, to tie the
team score at five.
THE TWO TEAMS alternated win-
'ning the next two matches. After John
"Manotti decisioned Michigan's Mike
DerGarabedian in the 134-lb. class,
Wolverine Tony LaTora, (142 lbs.)
showing no signs of the injury sustained
at the Wolverine Open, won a major
decision, 12-3, over Gary Kaschek. The
four points for the victory put Michigan
on top 9-8 in team scoring.
It was the last time the Wolverines
led in the match. As coach Dale Bahr
explained, "They have just a little more
balance than us."
Nowhere was this more evident than
in the weights from 150 lbs. through 177
lbs.
PENN STATE swept the four weight
'classes beginning at 150 lbs. In this
Smatch Chris Bevilacqua decisioned
Brian Flack; 8-3. The Nittany Lions
followed with a major decision by Greg
Elinsky over Kevin Hill, 13-5 and a
superior decision by Eric Brugel, 22-9

.i

over Bill Elbin and capping the sweep
with Dan Mayo's 14-5 major decision
over Dan Richards.
At this point Penn State had the mat-
ch clinched at 24-9. But Michigan's Kirk
Trost (190) won an 11-5 decision over
Bob Harr, and heavyweight Rob
Rechsteiner, though severely hampered
by a deep thigh bruise, ended the match
on a high note for Michigan winning a
major decision over Chris Bilodeau,
14-3.
Bahr did not seem surprised or
unhappy with the loss.
"They're sixth in the nation and I'd

put them even higher than that," he
said. "We've wrestled the best teams in
the nation and they are up there."
AS FOR THE apparent weakness at
the middleweights, Bahr had an ex-
planation.
"We got back from the Vegas (Las
Vegas) tournament on Sunday," he
said. "Guys like Hill and Elbin can't
lose eight or nine pounds in only two
days of practice. "We'll just have to see
if they can handle the weights and
maybe we'll have to reshuffle them."
It was the first dual match of the

season for the two teams following very
successful preseason tournament
showings. The Nittany Lions, ranked
sixth nationally, came into last night's
match fresh from the Penn State In-
vitational Tournament in which they
claimed individual championships in
five of the 10 weight classes.
Michigan similarly was successful in
last weekend's Caesar's Palace
Collegiate Wrestling Invitational. Out
of 44 teams, the Wolverines took seven-
th place, claiming five place-winners.

The University
Activities Center

I

is accepting
positions for

applications for the
Excutive Offices:

Vaily roto by 1OD WOOLF
Michigan sophomore Kevin Hill pulls Greg Elinsky of Penn State down to the mat in last night's wrestling match. Elin-
sky won with a major decision over Hill, while Penn State defeated Michigan.

FORMER 'M'STAR NOW PROMOTER AND COMMENTATOR:

President
Vice-President of Finance
Vice-President of Programming
Vice-President of Publicity and
Promotion
APPLICANTS MUST HAVE EXPERIENCE
Job descriptions and applications are available at
the UAC offices, second floor of the Michigan Union
starting Friday, December 9th, 1983
Applications are due by Friday, January 20th, 1984
qualified applicants will be contacted for interviews
for more information call UAC 763-1 107

MacKay still nets success in tennis

By ADAM MARTIN
Is there life after competing in the
pro ranks?
There certainly is-if you're Barry
MacKay.
MACKAY, A 1957 graduate of
Michigan, starred from 1955-57 as a
member of the Wolverine tennis team
before turning professional in 1961.
Now, however, MacKay-48 years
young-may not be playing competitive
tennis, but you can bet neither the com-
petition nor the game is out of his
system.
"I miss the competitiveness (of ten-
nis)," said MacKay. "But I'm very ha-
ppy with what I'm doing now, and I'm
glad I'm able to stay with sports."
MACKAY IS currently the head of the
Barry MacKay Sports Corporation, a
San Francisco-based company involved
in several ventures, including
promotion of the TransAmerica Open, a
$265,000 Super Series event on the Volvo.
Grand Prix Tennis circuit.
In addition, the Dayton, Ohio native
works as a tennis commentator for the
USA network,. a cable TV station, the
Public Broadcasting System (PBS),
and has also done some TV work for

Home Box Office (HBO).
MacKay also is involved in
developing tennis camps for under-,
privileged.youths.
AFTER ACCOMPLISHING so much
in the 18 years since he left the pros,
Alum ni*
Update
does Barry MacKay have any future
goals?
"I think I would like to be able to
create a permanent tennis or multi-
sports/entertainment center in the Bay
area," said MacKay.
For now, though, the former
Michigan tennis captain is content to
deal with the hefty share of competition
in his current life.
MACKAY SEES certain parallels
between his present broadcasting effor-
ts and his competitive experiences in
the tennis world.
The 1957 NCAA champion said,
"Tennis ties over to what I'm doing
won ammmmmmu , ,

today-the experiences from com-
peting are certainly invaluable in the
big world."
MacKay looks forward to the
business-oriented aspects-selling
sports to communities and to sponsors.
"I'm better at these things," MacKay
commented. "And frankly, they're a
little more lucrative." '
AS A PLAYER, MacKay was noted
for his intensity. He recalled, "I
thrived on pressure and com-
petitiveness."
MacKay contends with similar
pressure as a broadcast journalist. On-
ce again, his experience and backround
aid his current work.
"There's a lot of pressure in
television, especially at courtside,"
where the former U.S. Davis Cup
champion does most of his TV work.
"YOU HAVE 60 seconds to interview
a player-it's a real timing thing, a
challenge," MacKay said.
Still, surmounting the pressure
requires a certain camaraderie among
players and interviewers. MacKay
feels he has developed close relation-
ships with several players.
"You have to get to know the players;
you have to have a feel for it."
MACKAY STRESSES camaraderie,
remembering an incident with
Guillermo Vilas a few years back.
Vilas had made it through the semi-
final round of the Italian Open after a
grinding five-set match in super hot
conditions. MacKay recalled, "He just
looked as though he didn't want to be
bothered." The men upstairs urged
MacKay to get an interview, but
he refrained.
It paid off.
"THE NEXT day, he wins (the
finals) and walks right by about. 25
reporters and puts his arm around me
and said like 'what do you want to
know'," MacKay said.
Obviously, not all players grant
MacKay such respect, but he knows
how to cope with the situation.

"Youdevelop a sense of' when or
when not to talk, and sometimes you
have to tell the director 'we better
pass'."
This sense of timing has boosted
MacKay in many of his endeavors, and,
at 48 his time has just begun.

. .

THE TURKEY IS WAITING

_

THE TREE WILL BE TRIMMED
WILL YOU BE THERE?
NOT WITHOUT A RIDE!I
$1 May Find You One..
CALL MICHIGAN DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
764-0557
and place your ad today!

Sports information photo
Former Michigan tennis captain Barry MacKay, shown here in his playing
days, won thesNCAA championship in 1957.

Fridays
FROM ANN ARBOR
EXPRESS
TO
METRO AIRPORT & DETROIT

LEAVING MICHIGAN UNION

11:00am
2:00pm
A ':flnm

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