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October 18, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-10-18

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, October 18, 1983
UAC opens '83

Rx.. M A T1f'K7 K TUTQLU'I

tyiMA.' IYr LLjIarilmj
This year's homecoming means more than just a
football game, beginning with a dance in the Union
Ballroom tonight and ending Sunday with two.
popular rock performers.
Staffers at the University Activities Center, who
have organized most of the week's events, say they
will be offering students "a totally new look at
homecoming," according to senior Terri Grumer of
UAC..
THE CLIMAX of the week will be at Saturday's
game between Michigan and Iowa, when winners will
be picked at halftime for the homecoming raffle. The
grand prize will be a year's use of a Dodge Daytona,
complete with warranty, maintainence, and in-
surace.
Raffle tickets have been on sale for three weeks,
and proceeds from the drawing will be donated to
student finanical aid. UAC members hope to sell
20,000 tickets, said Homecoming Publicity Chair-
woman Nancy Ellis.
To lead up to the game and drawing, UAC has plan-
ned several nights of fun and games. Tonight, the
New Dittlies will bring rock and roll to the Michuigan

Union Ballroom for students' danci
HOMECOMING events on Thurs
mass-consumption, with the Union
contest at 8 p.m. kicking off the e
The one who eats the most free
minutes wins.
For those who prefer liquid cons
don't have any midterms Frida
homecoming progressive bar ma
at 8 p.m. Participants will trave
Time Charley's, and Dooley's, whe
special card stamped..
The first 300 people who come to t
for their fourth stamp will receive
T-shirts, and everyone with two
eligible -for a raffle for concert
prizes.
FRIDAY BRINGS more food, w
Za" - a 312-foot-long Sicilian-style
the world's largest ever made. T
from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., when v
slices for $2 apiece.
Friday night will feature the trad
pep rally. The parade will begin a

Homecoming
ing pleasure. Mudbowl, on the corner of South University and
sday center around Washtenaw, and will travel along South University to
's ice cream eating its final destination in front of the Union. Several
vening of feasting. University organizations will present floats, which
ice cream in 15 will be accompanied down the street by the Michigan
Marching Band.
umption (and who THE PEP RALLY also begins at 7:30 p.m., and is
ay morning), the sponsored by Alpha Delta Phi fraternity, on the cor-
rathon also begins ner of South State and Madison. Michigan football
el to Rick's, Good coach Bo Schembechler, the Michigan cheerleaders
re they will have a and pom-pon girls, the marching band, and former
gymnastics coach Newt Lokin will lead the cheers for
he University Club the Wolverines.
free homecoming Homecoming Day gets off to an early start, with
o stamps will be the Go Blue Run, sponsored by the Student Alumni
tickets and door Council. The North Campus race will benefit the
University of Michigan scholarship program. And at
vith the "Ultimate 10 a.m., Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity will wallow
pizza - said to be in the Mudbowl with Phi Delta Theta in the annual
he pizza will cook football struggle.
olunteers will'sell The homecoming week draws to a close Saturday
night with a performance by the Tubes at Hill
itional parade and Auditorium, and a Sunday night appearance by
t 7:30 p.m. at the Jackson Browne at Crisler Arena.

Shamir appoints new finance minister

JERUSALEM (AP) - Prime Minister
Yitzhak Shamir overcame opposition
within his ruling Likud bloc yesterday
and appointed Yigal Cohen-Orgad, an
economic consultant and political
hawk, as finance minister.
Liberal Party deputies of Shamir's

initially opposed Cohen-Orgad for the
finance post, and their later acceptance
removed a major hurdle in the path of
Shamir's week-old government. Cohen-
Orgad's appointment is to be presented
to Parliament today and is virtually
certain of approval.
Industry Minister Gideon Patt, who

heads the Liberal Party and was a con-
tender to replace Aridor, announced on
Israel Television after a meeting with
Shamir that he congratulated Cohen-
Orgad on his appointment.
THE LIBERALS had threatened to
leave the governing coalition if they did
not receive the finance post, and Patt
gave no reason for the party's sudden
about-face.
An Israeli Television commentator
said the Liberals might be given the
Foreign Ministry, now held by Shamir,
and a deputy premiership.
The appointment of 46-year-old
Cohen-Orgad gives the Cabinet's top
posts to hardliners who refused to vote
for the 1979 Israel-Egypt peace treaty.
They are Shamir, Defense Minister
Moshe Arens and Cohen-Orgad.
COHEN-ORGAD said in 1979 that he
opposed the treaty because it did not in-
clude his demand that Egypt promise in
advance to agree to Israel's "right" to
remain in the occupied West Bank of
the Jordan River.
Israel Radio said Cohen-Orgad is
building a house in the West Bank set-
tlement of Ariel, which the government
plans to turn into a major urban center.
Israeli doves have claimed that
government expenditures on Jewish
settlements in the West Bank is a major
cause of the economic upheaval.
AS THE senior member of Shamir's
Herut faction in the parliamentary
finance committee, Cohen-Orgad shar-
ply criticized Aridor, saying he had not

done enough to cut government spen-
ding and subsidies on basic com-
modities.
Shamir succeeded Prime Minister
Menachem Begin, and Finance
Minister Yoram Aridor left the Cabinet
last week in a furor after his plan to link
Israel's shekel to the dollar was rejec-
ted. He made the proposal after the
government last week devalued the
shekel by 23 percent and hiked the price
of basic foodstuffs by 50 percent.
Those actions led to a two-hourstrike
Sunday by an estimated one million
workers - 70 percent of the country's
work force.
The opposition Labor Party has filed
a no-confidence motion in Parliament
that is to be debated today or tomorrow.
Shamir's government was endorsed
Oct. 10 by a 60-53 parliamentary vote
and was expected to defeat the motion.
ISRAEL'S staggering economy
received another boost with an
agreement between the government
and private banks designed to avert a
stock market crash. The market was
shut down Oct. 9tafter panicky Israelis
pushed to sell their stocks and ' buy
foreign currency, especially U.S.
dollars.
Stock Exchange general manager
Yossi Nitazni announed that trading in
bonds would resume Thursday and
general share trading would begin
again Sunday.

For exceptional College Grads
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IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Reagan names McFarlane to
national security advisor's post
WASHINGTON - President Reagan named Middle East special envoy
Robert McFarlane as his national security adviser yesterday, saying the
former Marine officer "shares my view about the need for a strong
America."
McFarlane, a 45-year-old former Marine lieutenant colonel and foreign
policy professional who worked in the Nixon and Ford administration under
Henry Kissinger, immediately took over the job from William Clark, who
Reagan is nominating as secretary of interior, the White House job does not
require Senate confirmation.
In his new job, McFarlane will be responsible for briefing the president
each day on foreign policy developments and summarizing for him the
various options presented by the State Department and other foreign policy
experts.
After serving as a national security special assistant in the Nixon and Ford
administration, McFarlane joined the Republican staff of the Senate Armed
Services Committee.
Battles rage in S. Beirut slums
BEIRUT, Lebanon - Artillery and small-arms battles broke out yesterday
in Christian and Shiite Moslem slums south of Beirut, and U.S. Marines at
the airport eased an alert and evacuated two wounded men from front-line
bunkers.
Residents in Ain Rummaneh, a Christian area along the old "green line"
that bisects Beirut into Christian and Moslem sectors, reported a Lebanese
army tank fired its cannon on the neighboring Shiite sector of Chiyah.
Sniper fire and artillery barrages also were reported in the surrounding
Shiite areas of Bourj el-Barajneh, Sfeir, Metahan, Sannin and Barid.
There were no immediate reports of casualties. ]
Smoke hung over Souk el-Gharb, the mountain ridge town held by the
Lebanese army above the Marine base, and the sound of heavy artillery and
rockets could be heard from the airport below.
A photographer, Don Mell, reported from the airport that mortar shells
fell about a half-mile from Marine positions in the area between Lebanese
army posts in Khalde and the Druse-controlled town of Shweifat.
Berkeley prof gets Nobel Prize
STOCKHOLM, Sweden - Gerard Debreu of the University of California at
Berkeley won the 1983 Nobel Prize in economics yesterday for showing
mathematically how the market system achieves a balance between supply
and demand.
Debreu, 62, a French-born professor at Berkeley, was the 12th American to
win the economics prize in the 15 years it has been awarded.
The economist was cited for abstract mathematical models that confir-
med Adam Smith's "invisible hand" theory - the action of competing .forces
that stabilize prices in an unregulated economy.
The theory has been the linchpin of capitalism from early"laissez-faire"
systems to "Reaganomics" and other movements to reduce government in-
fluence in the market-place.
Debreu, a U.S. citizen since 1975, will receive a gold medal and 1.5 million
Swedish Kroner or $200,000 in Stockholm Dec. 10.
Yale lab loses infected hamsters
NEW HAVEN, Conn. - Traps were set and food was put out around a Yale
University medical laboratory yesterday as researchers crawled on the
floor looking for three disease-infected hamsters that escaped from their
cage, a school spokeswoman said.
But officials believe the rodents carrying a potentially fatal virus had
burrowed into bags containing old bedding removed from the rodent cages
and were incinerated, Yale medical school spokeswoman Marjorie Noyes
said.
The hamsters were used in experiments and had been infected with the
virus that causes Creutzfeldt-Jakob Sydrome, which attacks the nervous
system and results in dementia. Noyes said the virus can only be transmit-
ted to humans through contact with infected brain tissue.
"The disease is extremely hard to transmit," she said, emphasizing there
was little hazard to anyone in the building.
The rodents escaped Oct. 3 from their cage in the university's Department
of Epidemiology and Public Health in the Yale Medical School. Edward
Adelberg, the deputy provost for biomedical sciences, said they escaped
when their cage was warped by a heating process used to decontaminate in-
fectious materials.
Engineer charged with leaking
secret papers to Soviets
SAN FRANCISCO - An American engineer has been charged with stealing
and passing to Soviet-bloc agents documents aimed at helping the United
States survive a nuclear attack, the Justice Department said yesterday.
About 100 "extremely sensitive" classified documents allegedly were
passed in a series of 14 meetings over a 4-year period. They were turned
over to Polish intelligence agents who routed them to the Soviet Union, the
Justice Department said.
The documents included the information on the Minuteman Intercontinen-
tal Ballistic Missile and the ballistic missile defense research and develop-

ment programs of the United States, according to federal authorities.
James Durward Harper Jr., a 49-year-old consulting engineer from Moun-
tain View, was arrested Saturday morning and held without bail after a brief
appearance yesterday before U.S. Magistrate Owne Woodruff.
FBI officials said Harper'allegedly ased his foreign contact for $1 million
and received more than $250,000 as an operative.
Vol. XCI V-No. 36
Tuesday, October 18, 1983
(ISSN 0745-967X)
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
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Reagan legally paves
way for candidacy

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From AP and UPI
WASHINGTON - President
Reagan, still refusing to say whether
he will run for re-election, became a
presidential candidate yesterday "in
the eyes of the law," and his campaign
chairman said he was "a solid
favorite" to win.
The president signed two letters at
his desk in the Oval Office. One
authorized Sen. Paul Laxalt, (R-Nev.),
to establish a campaign committee. A
second informed the Federal Election
Commission that he was "hereby
authorizing this committee as my prin-
cipal campaign committee..."
WHILE REAGAN refused to say

whether he will seek a second term, his
senior aides and advisers have said
they have no doubts.
The president told reporters who wit-
nessed the signing that he might an-
nounce his intentions "by the first of the
year." Asked whether his signature in
black ink on the letters meant that he
was running, the president replied with
a smile, "in the eyes of the law."
After the president signed the letters,
Edward Rollins, his assistant for
political affairs who is leaving the
White House staff to direct the commit-
tee to re-elect Reagan and Vice
President George Bush, said: "We're
100 percent confident the president is
running."

Greek traditions re-examined.

(Continued from Page 1)
back. Serenading is a social event in
which members of a fraternity or
sorority visit another house and sing
songs to one another.
But a policy that allows any member
of the Greek system to enter the house
would allow for anyone to be prowling
around, Rock said.
The Panhellenic Association and In-
terfraternity Council last year
established a new set of rules governing
the stealing of composites.
THE NEW RULES state that frater-
nity or sorority members must be
wearing some type of Greek insignia,
must raid before midnight, must enter
through the front door and remain on
the first floor, and must take only the
composite.
The new regulations were adopted

because sororities were"getting con-
cerned about safety and rapes, etc.,"
said Panhellenic President Katz,
"because we don't want people running
through the house in the middle of the
night."
Last year, members of a fraternity
broke in through the kitchen window of
the Alpha Phi sorority house and the
women in the house could not get into
the kitchen to protect it because the
doors were locked between meals.
"When we called police and said
there were fraternity guys breaking in
our house, they just said 'ha,' " said
sorority president Linda Potter.
Composite raiding is "a tradition and
has always been fun but could be
dangerous if not done in fun," Potter
said.

Center for Chir
The University

nese Studies
of Michigan

II ' °
rr t ,

third annual

Alexander

Eckstein

Memorial Lecture
Will Reforms Modernize
China's Economy?
SA ?1(4 Pcrl 1 Y

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