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April 15, 1983 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-04-15

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Page 2-Friday, April 15, 1983-The Michigan Daily
Center aids rape victims, families

(Continued from Page 1)
and family, the center operates a 24-
hour crisis line. The center, located at
4009 Washtenaw, also offers legal,
medical, and rape-prevention infor-
mation. It was opened in 1976 under a
federal grant, and now operates with
county, city and state grants.
Both individual and group counseling

is offered by appointment, although
Price said the center has not received
enough simultaneous response to form
a crisis group for family and friends.
She said group therapy is helpful so
"people can realize they are not alone.
There is a lot of supportive sharing that
can happen in a group atmosphere.
FAMILY AND friends receive help

from a different counselor than the vic-
tim unless otherwise requested.
Counselors at the crisis center help
friends and family members deal with
their reactions following the rape.
"We help them first identify what
their feelings are. We help them accept
them," Price said. "We give them in-
formiation about crime and what they

can expect as a normal victim respon-
se."
COUNSELOR Theresa Foley said
part of her function is to guide people
through their recovery.
"You encourage psychological
healing processes," she said. "(Friends
and family members) need to know
that it's okay to be depressed. They've
suffered a loss. They need to be able to
grieve.''
Price said some of the problems
friends and family encounter involve a
misunderstanding about what rape is.
Friends and family of the victim may
try to keep the rape a secret.
"(THE RAPE is) misperceived as a
sexual act rather than as a violent
crime," Foley said. "Most of society
believes myths about rape and blame
the victim, so the family is trying to
avoid the social stigma."
She said such misperceptions can
cause friends and family to direct their
anger about the assault toward the vic-
tim, instead of the attacker.
"(One) University student was raped
by a man she saw at a football- game.
He was very violent at the game. She
didn't resist during the assault because
she had seen the violence," Foley said.
"Her parents blame her (for the
rape). "
PRICE SAID this kind of reaction is
common and often makes people reluc-
tant to seek help. "They may fear that
the victim caused this to happen. They
don't realize that sexual assault is a
random event," she said. "They have to
realize that you can't do anything about
something that you cannot control. For
some people, this is a hard step to
take."
Price said friends and family mem-
bers "sometimes find it hard to accept
the fact that victims aren't angry and
that they're just thankful to be alive."
Gloria Krys, another counselor at the
center, said people close to the victim
can experience the horror of the attack
vicariously.
"Anyone who has someone near to
them that is sexually assaulted has to
deal with their own mortality," Krys
said. "It puts everyone into their own
crisis."
Police.
notes
A man wearing a ski mask and
wielding a gun robbed Zingerman's
Deli at 422 Detroit St. late Wednesday
night, Ann Arbor Police said yesterday.
The man, whom witnesses described as
being in his late 50s, entered the
restaurant and demanded money. After
receiving an unknown amount of cash
he orderedathe employees into the
basement and fled. Police have no
suspects in the case.
- Halle Czechowski

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press international reports
Nuclear missiles in Cuba not
needed, says Soviet general
MOSCOW - The Soviet Union has "no need" to put nuclear missiles in
Cuba in retaliation for U.S. deployment of new medium-range rockets in
Europe later this year, a top Soviet general says.
It was the clearest signal yet from the Soviets that Cuba does not figure in
their threat to retaliate for the planned "Euromissile" deployment.
The comments were made by Maj. Gen. Yuri Lebedev, a military adviser
to Soviet arms-control negotiators, in an interview.
Kremlin officials have warned repeatedly they will put the United States:'
in an "analogous position" if the American missiles are stationed in Western
Europe, within a few minutes' striking distance of Soviet territory.
These statements raised speculation in the United States that the Soviets
were considering deploying mid-range rockets in Cuba.
Lebedev, dismissing that possibility, did not make clear exactly what the
Soviets planned to do if the U.S. missiles are deployed. But he said one of the
retaliatory options available to Soviet leaders would simply be expanding
their own intermediate-range nuclear forces in Europe.
Budget Committee deadlocked
WASHINGTON - A bitterly divided Senate Budget Committee
deadlocked yesterday over a possible tax increase for 1984 after a
Democratic-led move to dismantle much of President Reagan's tax
program failed on a tie vote.
The 11-11 tie came when Sen. Mark Andrews (R-N.D.) joined all 10
Democrats in calling for a $30 billion tax hike, the amount that would be
raised if this year's 10 percent personal income tax cut were repealed.
"I think we're going to have to increase taxes if we're going to be honest
with ourselves," Andrews said. The committee's 11 other Republicans voted
no.
In addition to rejecting the $30 billion proposal, the committee rejected
proposals for a smaller 1984 tax increase, a larger one and no increase at all.
Scientists plan artificial heart
SALT LAKE CITY - As doctors prepare for the next artificial heart im-
plant, researchers are making strides toward developing a heart for small
people and an implantable electric motor to replace the bulky air pump now
required.
Work began in November at the University of Utah on a heart with oval in-
stead of round ventricles that researchers say could be critical in making a
heart compact enough for smaller adults and still have adequate pumping
capacity.
"It's just an improvement of the output of the heart with smaller size and
better fit," said Walter Rohloff, head of the school's Artificial Organs
Division machine shop.
Furthermore, doctors anticipate implanting in five to 10 years a heart
carrying a tiny motor that would be-powered by a battery pack worn on a
recipient's belt.
Vietnamese call for peace talks
BANGKOK, Thailand - Vietnam, apparently shifting from the battlefield
to the diplomatic arena yesterday, called for talks with its anti-communist
opponents in Southeast Asia to end the four-year-old guerrilla war in Cam-
bodia.
Theproposal followed a Vietnamese announcement the day before that it
was withdrawing some of its estimated 180,000 troops in Cambodia.
Thailand's military government and army gave little credence to the latest
move.
'To all countries in the region, dialogue is useful while confrontation is
harmful," said the Vietnamese Communist Party newspaper Nhan Dan in
calling for talks between the Communist governments of Vietnam, Cam-
bodia and Laos and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, ASEAN,
which includes Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, Singapore and the Philip-
pines.
The party paper claimed that some leaders in ASEAN have realized that
dialogue would be useful in solving the Cambodian problem, which began
when Vietnamese troops invaded Cambodia in late 1978 and drove the Com-
munist Khmer Rouge government from Phnom Penh, replacing it with pro-
Vietnamese Communist regime headed by Heng Samrin.
"We are not interested in Vietnam's proposal," said a Thai army'
spokesman, Col. Pobsuk Suthanunda. "Vietnam has made such pledges
before but nothing happened."
Pitb r hi m t ssa ee c p PITTSBURGH - Two inmates armed with weapons smuggled to them ins
an apparent escape plot took a jail guard and a civilian employee hostage
yesterday at the maximum-security Western Penitentiary state prison.
The inmates were identified as Richard Henkel, 45, of Pittsburgh, a con-
victed felon accused in bizarre murder and extortion cases, and Louis
Coviello, 26, of Dunmore, Pa., a convicted murderer and robber.
Henkel is charged with plotting to extort money from prominent Pit-
tsburgh residents, including Pittsburgh Steelers' owner Art Rooney, by at-
taching bombs to them.

An Allegheny County Sheriff's Department spokesman said the two were
in a basement identification center' being readied for transfer to a pretrial
hearing for Henkel when they overpowered guard Daniel Kohut, 39, and
Kostas Mastros, 51, a data supervisor, at about 8:30 a.m.
The sheriff's office'said it was tipped Wednesday that Henkel and Coviello
were planning an escape around the hearing. Prison officials said no
weapons or contraband were found in a search of their cells.
Vol. XCIII, No. 155
Friday, April 15, 1983
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $13 September through Aprjl (2 semesters); $14 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday Mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $7.50 in Ann Arbor; $8,by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
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bor, MI148109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to
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dicate and Field Enterprises Newspaper Syndicate.
News room (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY. Sports desk, 763-0375; Circulation,
764-0558; Classified Advertising, 764-0554; Billing, 764-0550.

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11

Editor-in-chief ................
Managing Editor ...............
Opinion Page Editors........... .
University Editor...............
News Editor .............
Student Affairs Editor .
Arts Magazine Editor .
Associate Arts Magazine Editors.
Sports Editor.
Associate Sports Editors....

...BARRY WITT
...JANET RAE
KENT REDDING
DAVID SPAK
FANNIE WEINSTEIN
GEORGE ADAMS
BETH ALLEN
BEN TICHO
LARRY DEAN
MARE HODGES
SUSAN MAKUCH
.JOHN KERR
JIM DWORMAN
LARRY FREED
CHUCK JAFFE

son Faye, Chris Gerbosi. Paul Helgren. Steve Hunter.
Doug Levy. Tim Mokinen, Mike McGraw. Rob Pollard
Don Price, Paul Resnick. Scott Salowich. Amy Schiff,
Paula Schipper, Adorm Schwartz. John Tayer, Stevel
Wise.
BUSINESS MANAGER..........SAM G. SLAUGHTER IV
SALES MANAGER ........... MEG GIBSON
DISPLAY MANAGER .................. JEFF VOIGHT
CLASSIFIEDS MANAGER..............PAM GILLERY
OPERATIONS MANAGER ..........LAURIE ICZKOVITZ
FINANCE MANAGER ................... JOE TRULIK
NATIONAL MANAGER.................GITA PILLAI
ASSISTANT DISPLAY MANAGER ......NANCY GUSSIN
ASST. CLASSIFIEDS MANAGER .... TOMGUNDERSON
CIRCULATION COORDINATOR ......... TIM McGRAW
RUIN&JC. STAFF-. .RniA A.fni .... nvi.J*,.l R *...A-1

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