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March 31, 1983 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-31

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Page 2-Thursday, March 31, 1983-The Michigan I
Committee
LANSING (UPI) - Lawmakers yesterday ap-
proved Gov. James Blanchard's proposed $225
million budget-cutting executive order, charac-
terized as the last step in getting the state's finances
in order.
Treasury Department officials, meanwhile, said
release of some of the more than $500 million in
dpferred aid to colleges, community colleges, schools
and local governments should begin within two
7eeks. A school aid payment due tomorrow,
htowever, will be held up in the meantime.;
THE HOUSE Appropriations Committee approved ,
the budget slash on a 13-0 vote, with all six
Republican members absent. Several hours later, ;
their Senate counterparts followed suit, approving ;
the reduction on a 7-4 vote.
House GOP committee members later fumed they
had been shut out of the voting, even though their ;
senior member acknowledged they were late to the
imeeting. et
The action came just one day after Blanchard
signed a 38 percent income tax increase which will ;

s approve
raise an estimated $675 million this fiscal year. Still
pending is action on a supplemental budget ap-
propriation which could amount to $250 million.
CUTS TO colleges, including aid to private in-
stitutions, total more than $27 million.
Plans call for restoring in the next fiscal year about
half of the amount cut from individual college grants.
No breakdown was available on the amount to be
restored.
Proposed cuts are as follows; Central Michigan
University, $1.2 million; Eastern Michigan Univer-
sity, $1.4 million; Ferris State College, $882,000;
Grand Valley State Colleges, $525,000; Lake Superior
State College, $233,000; Michigan State University,
$5.8 million (including agriculture experiment
station and cooperative extension); Michigan
Technological University, $854,000; Northern
Michigan University, $851,000; Oakland University,
$790,000; Saginaw Valley State College, $278,000;
University of Michigan, $5.8 million; U-M Flint,
$338,000; 'U-M' Dearborn, $375,000; Wayne State
University, $1.7 million; Western Michigan Univer-
sity, $1.8 million.

budget cuts
EXCEPT FOR Wayne State, the cuts average
about 3.7 percent. Wayne State was docked less than
that amount, a Budget Department spokesman said,
because its fiscal year runs on a different calendar
and its restoration has already been deducted from
the reduction.
The executive order takes its largest bite out of the
Department of Social Services - $69.5 million.
Budget Director Phillip Jourdan explained that
most of that amount will be accounted for through
deferred Medicaid payments to hospitals and
recognizing additional federal funds.
THE ORDER also contains a provision that both
legislative appropriations committees will be able to
approve specific areas of cuts in state departments,
although the total amount of reductions will remain
unchanged.
"I think this should be characterized as the last
step in getting the state's financial house in order,"
Jourdan said. The administration hopes another such
order will not have to be issued.
S AT
~~*S
comparison
~ unnecessary
(Continued from Page 1)
educational statement," Erickson says.
Because the University does not use
quotas for admitting students from
various states, Erickson says there is
no reason for admissions to use infor-
mation on state comparisons.
But the University does seek
geographical balance: "We might give
an edge to a student from Arizona over
a student from Illinois," says Erickson.
Both Erickson and Womer endorse
the use of SAT scores in the college ad-
missions process, however. "It's a good
second criterion," says Womer, "the
first being high school grades."
In addition to the student's grade
point average and SAT scores, ad-
IL emissions officers also consider class
AP Photo rank, improvement in grades, level of
difficulty of coursework, and the diver-
ildren ages sity of the student's academic program.
But, Erickson said, "test scores do
predict academic success in college."

All together now
Three-thousand young Japanese violinists performed in yesterday's Suzuki
three and above from all over the country joined in the mass concert.

Method contest in Tokyo. Chi

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
State job training panel name
LANSING - Gov. James Blanchard named a special job training council
yesterday, saying this economically ravaged state will provide a crucial test
for a new federally funded program.
Ann Arbor publisher Philip Power was named to chair the 50-member
Michigan Job Training Coordinating Council, which is described as the focal
point for implementing the new Job Training and Partnership Act expected
to bring approximately $200 million in federal funds to the state beginning
Oct. 1.
The first task of the council - composed of representatives from business,
industry, labor, government and education - will be to advise Blanchard on
the designation of service delivery areas, the regions in which training will
be conducted.
Blanchard said appointing the council is the third step in his economic
program and called job training and retraining "the cornerstone of our ef-
fort to put people back to work."
Shots to curb meningitis begun
CHICAGO - Mass immunizations began yesterday in one of the city's
largest public housing projects to prevent an outbreak of meningitis from
spreading, public health officials said.
Six people in Chicago have died from the disease this year.
Deputy Health Commissioner Bernard Turnock said the innoculations will
be given over a two-day period to residents over age 2 at the West Side ALBA
homes, which house 12,000 people in 3,700 apartments.
The Chicago Health Department recommended the inoculations at the
ALBA homes after three.cases of meningitis were confirmed there this year
- one resulting in the death of a 16-year-old youth Feb. 22.
"We are concentrating on this one because they've had three cases among
a major portion of that complex," Turnock said.
Britain proposes additional
50 cent-a-barrel oil price cut
Britain proposed an additional 50 cent-a-barrel cut in its North Sea Crude
oil prices yesterday in a move analysts said should stabilize world oil prices
and prevent a new showdown with OPEC.
The restrained British response to the Organization of Petroleum Expor-
ting Countries' decision earlier this month to slash its base oil price by $5 to
$29 a barrel means a global oil price war probably will be averted.
British National Oil Corp. offered to further lower its North Sea bench-
mark crude to $30 a barrel from February's proposed $30.50 price. Britain's
other less desirable North Sea oil would be reduced by 75 cents a barrel.
In Norway, a spokesman for the Norwegian National Oil Co. said it was
likely to follow the British lead and reduce its North Sea Oil as early as
Tuesday.
"The British action indicates that both BNOC and the British government
would very much like to see OPEC's new price agreement hold and not get
into a pricing struggle with OPEC," said Alvin Silber, analyst at Dean Wit-
ter Reynolds Inc. in New York.
Space shuttle countdown begins
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - The 93-hour countdown began yesterday for
the maiden launch Monday of the space shuttle Challenger, grounded for
more than two months by engine and equipment problems.
NASA Test Director Frank Merlino signaled the start of the long-awaited
final series of preparations by issuing a 2 p.m. EST "call to stations" for
launch control center personnel.
The four astronauts who will fly the Challenger on its five-day, $266-million
mission are to arrive at the space center Friday from their homes in
Houston. Spaceport officials said Paul Weitz, Karol Bobko, Donald Peterson
and Story Musgrave will be given weekend briefings, and then will board the
ship about two hours before launch.
Highlights of the flight include the launching of a giant tracking satellite
during the first day and the first shuttle spacewalk by Musgrave and Peter-
son during the fourth day.
Israelis kill Palestinian youth
Israeli Troops shot dead a Palestinian youth during protests on the oc-
cupied West Bank yesterday and thousands of Israeli Arabs chanting "PLO,
PLO" marched in the Galilee region to protest the seizure of Arab-owned
land.
The violence came as Syria and the Soviet Union both accused Israel of
threatening war against Damascus. Israel has 30,000 troops in Lebanon
facing an estimated 40,000 Syrian forces.
Eleven people were injured by rocks thrown by Palestinian demonstrators
in the occupied territory, Israel Radio said, despite Israeli deployment of
5,000 riot police for Land Day - the 7th annual protest of Israel's seizure of
Arab-owned land.

"We are demanding our own government, our own state, just like every
other people in the world," one marcher said. "We have been here 2,000
years. Those who rule Israel, they came from Russia, Poland, Iran and the
United States. This is our country."
SJbe 3idhigau IBlaiIg
Vol. XCIII, No. 142
Thursday, March 31, 1983
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
scription rates: $13 September through April (2 semesters); $14 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $7.50 in Ann Arbor; $8 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
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bor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Daily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to
United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times Syn-
dicate and Field Enterprises Newspaper-Syndicate.
News room (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY. Sports desk, 763-0375; Circulation,
764-0558; Classified Advertising, 764-0554; Billing, 764-0550.

0
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'TA I~i'TET '_ThCJE Th4W(9

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DASCOLA STYLISTS
HAIRCUTS
by
PROFESSIONALS
Liberty off State ........669-9329
East U. at South U........ 662-0354
Arborland ..............971-9975
Maple Village ........... 761-2733

i .1

t
x
r
k
f
s
e

76- GUIDE IS HIRING!
We are currently selecting PEER COUNSELORS for the '83-84 academic year.
76-GUIDE provides phone counseling, referrals, and crisis intervention.
This is a paid position requiring evening and weekend work. GUIDE workers
must be enrolled students, and must possess good interpersonal skills.
Previous counseling work is not necessary.
To apply, pick up an application and information sheet at Counseling Services,
3100 Michigan Union, between 8:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m., M-F.
Applications will be available from March 25 thru April 1.

"NO
MORE
MR NICE
GUY'
"I'm not my old lovable
self when I'm around
cigarettes. I-get real
cranky. So I want all you
smokers to quit once
and for all. And who
knows? You might even
put a smile on my face"
American Cancer Society
This space contributed as a public service.

0
6
0

Deadline for applications is Mon., April 4, 5:00 p.m.

B. I I

I

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FICTION

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Managing Editor........
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BARRYW ITT
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L ARRtY FREED)

son Faye. Chris Gerbasi. Paul Helgren. Steve Hunter.
Doug Levy, Tim Mokinen. Mike McGraw. Rob Pollard
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Poula Schipper. Adamn Schwartz. John Toyer, Steve
Wise.
BUSINESS MANAGER ........SAM G. SLAUGHTER IV
SALES MANAGER:.. ...........MEG GIBSON
DISPLAY MANAGER.................... JEFF VOIGT
CLASSIFIED MANAGER................PAM GILLERY
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