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March 12, 1983 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-12

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4

Page 2-Saturday, March 12, 1983-The Michigan Daily
Reagan asks for
reduced teen
minimum wage

WASHINGTON (AP) - Despite the
opposition of organized labor,
President Reagan sent Congress
legislation yesterday to establish a
lower minimum wage for youth in
summer - 12.50 compared with the
curent $3.35 minimum - and to provide
tax credits for businessmen who hire
the hard-core unemployed.
The president also asked Congress to
extend federal supplemental compen-
sation, available to those who have
exhausted their regular unemployment
benefits, for two million people from
March 31 to Sept. 30. Reagan, at a brief
news conference said the legislation
was "very special to me and certainly
deserves strong bipartisan support in
the Congress.
LABOR Secretary Raymond
Donovan said the program could create
700,000 new jobs by the end of 1984. He
called it "the most comprehensive
legislation to combat structural unem-
ployment in the post-war period."
Several previous attempts to lower
the minimum wage for young workers
have been defeated by Congress after
heavy union lobbying.
The Regan administration sought last
year to include a lower youth wage in
enterprisezone legislation to lure jobs
to depressed cities, but it was stripped
from the bill after organized labor
mounted an extensive lobbying cam-
paign.
IN OCTOBER 1977, the Senate rejec-
ted efforts to exempt youth under 21
from the minimum wage, or to set a
wage floor 15 percent to 25 percent

below the adult minimum.
That measure was backed by
business and opposed by labor, which
contended it was a plum for the fast-
food industry. The same objections are
being raised this time around.
"My concern is not whether Mc-
Donald's makes money or Burger King
makes money," Donovan told reporters
at the White House. "My concern is to
be given a tool by the Congress, long
overdue in my opinion, to begin to at-
tack this national tragedy."
REAGAN HAS argued that the
federal minimum wage is so high that
employers are discouraged from hiring
students and other young workers. But
the AFL-CIO has said it would put
teenagers in direct competition with
their elders for scarce jobs and vowed
to fight the proposal tooth-and-nail.
At its recent executive council
meeting in Bal Harbur, Fla., the AFL-
CIO leadership, in fact, called for an in-
crease in the current $3.35 minimum
wage, which has not changed since Jan.
1, 1981.
Donovan rejected contentions that
workers under the age of 22 would
receive less money for their work. "No
job at $3.35 an hour is far worse than a
job at $2.50," he.said, maintaining it
could create between 150,000 and
640,000 new jobs for youth.
HE ALSO SAID the administration
wants to limit the youth differential to
summer months - May 1 to Sept. 3 - to
further discourage any displacement of
adults. The civilian unemployment rate
in February was 10.4 percent. For youth
the rate was 22.2 percent, 45.4 percent
among black teenagers.

Spy dies AP Photo
Pallbearers carry the casket of former British diplomat Donald Maclean in-
to the Donskoy Monastery to be cremated yesterday. Maclean, who died of
cancer Thursday, was part of a spy ring that gave the Soviets atomic secrets
before he fled to Moscow in 1951.
Ruling extends to 'U'

(Continued from Page 1)
thought it was," said Grotrian.
HE SAID the National Association for
Student Financial Aid in Washington,
told universities not to change their ap-
plication forms to accommodate the
law.
"This move is a clear indication that
NASFA is saying the law is in trouble
and probably will not survive," he said.
Attorneys from the Minnesota Public
Interest Research Group (MPIRG),
one of the parties bringing the suit, said
the federal government will likely ap-
peal the Minnesota ruling.
JIM MILLER, executive director of
MPIRG, said "no one had a chance to
think (the bill) over - I wouldn't give
the bill that good of a chance of passage

today."
Grotrian said he objects to the ad-
ministrative burden the law would put
on the University's financial aid office.
If the law is enforced, every student
required to register for the draft would
have to include a letter of certification
from the Selective Service with his
financial aid applicaiton.
Under the law, University officials
would be committing a crime if they
gave a non-registrant financial aid. A
student who is convicted for not
registering could lose all federal finan-
cial aid and be sentenced to five years
in prison and/or a $10,000 fine.
GROTRIAN SAID the financial aid
process could be further complicated if
students who have registered have dif-
ficulties getting their confirmation let-
ters from the Selective Service.
Students who did not receive the let-
ter in time would have to sign affidavits
verifying that they are registered,
which would give them an extra 120
days to turn in the letter.
Grotrian said if any mix-ups occured
and the Selective Service failed to send
the certification in time to meet the
deadline, such students would have to

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
U.S. radar station will track
arms shipments to Salvadorans
WASHINGTON - The United States plans to establish a radar station in
Honduras to track small planes suspected of parrying arms from Nicaragua
to El Salvador's leftist rebels, Pentagon officials said yesterday.
The disclosure came after senior defense officials reported that airborne
arms traffic between Nicaragua and El Salvador has "picked up in recent
months."
The new radar station, which would be manned by 50 to 52 U.S. Air Force
personnel, was described officially as intended for the safety of U.S. air traffic
over Honduras. About 50 to 55 U.S. planes operate in Honduran air space in
an average month, said Pentagon officials.
However, these officials made it plain that the station's main purpose will
be to monitor suspected arms flights from Nicaragua across Honduras to El
Salvador.
These officials, who insisted on remaining anonymous, noted that the
radar equipment can "see" more than 240 miles and that this will enable it to
survey much of Nicaragua's air space.
W alesa urges stronger protests
GRUDZIADZ, Poland - Solidarity chief Lech Walesa, attending the trial
of a union colleague in the northern Polish city of Grudziadz, called yester-
day for more "determined forms" of protest to counter political indictments
of labor leaders.
His appeal came as workers at the Lenin shipyard in Gdansk, birthplace of
the outlawed labor federation, demanded revival of the union and urged
peaceful gatherings Sunday and Monday at a shipyard monument to mark
the declaration of martial law Dec. 13, 1981. The main provisions of mar-
tial law were officially lifted a year later.
Walesa spoke to reporters as he left the second day of the trial against An-
na Walentynowicz, an early Solidarity leader charged .with inciting an oc-
cupation strike at the Lenin shipyard for two days after martial law was
imposed. Authorities used tanks to enter the yard and suppress the strike.
Greeted by about 100 cheering supporters as he entered and left the cour-
troom, Walesa declared, "We have to stick together. We have to protest
against such trials, but not by overthrowing the authorities. We don't want to
overthrow the authorities. But we have to be more determined in our ac-
tions." "Different forms" of protest are needed against a new wave of political
trials of Solidarity figures, he said.
Norwegian nursing home head
guilty of poisoning 22 patients
TRONDHEIM, Norway - Scandanavia's biggest peace-time mass mur-
der case ended yesterday with the conviction of a former nursing home
superintendent in the poisoning deaths of 22 of his patients.
A jury of six women and four men who deliberated three days found Ar-
nfinn Nesset, 46, guilty after a five-month trial in Frostating provincial.
court in Trondheim, 230 miles north of Oslo.
Nesset faces a maximum penalty of 21 years in prison. the highest senten-
ce allowed under Norwegian law. There is no death penalty in Norway.
The deaths, which began in May 1977 and ended in November 1980, came
under investigation after a local journalist found that large quantities of the
drug curacit had been sent to a nursing home in Orkdal, a tiny village near
Trondheim.
Curacit, a muscle relaxant used in major operations, causes death by
paralysis immediately if a recipient is not receiving oxygen.
Senate rejects jobs bill boost
WASHINGTON - The Senate rejected 53-34 yesterday a Democratic at-
tempt to pump an additional $1.7 billion into a $3.8 billion package of new
jobs and other recession relief.
But Senate leaders gave up pushing for quick passage of the emergency
bill after President Reagan threatened to veto it unless it is spared from an
unrelated amendment to repeal tax withholding on interest and divident in-
come.
The Democratic effort to boost the measure's pricetag even beyond the
$4.9 billion version passed by the House lost on virtually a straight party-line
vote. It would have given cities and states more funds for public service jobs
than Reagan wants and added more money for emergency food and shelter
and health care for the needy.
But Reagan's veto threat focused on an unrelated and heavily lobbied
amendment to repeal tax withholding on income from dividends and in-
terest.
Venezuelan plane crash kills 18
CARACAS, Venezuela - A Venezuelan airliner crashed in flames yester-
day as it attempted to land at the western city of Barquisimeto and 18 of the
50 people aboard were killed, a Civil Defense spokesman said.
An official with the American consulate in Caracas, Ralph Daniels, said a
consulate officer was sent to Barquisimeto to investigate whether any of the
crash victims were U.S. citizens. "There are several people who might have
been Americans, but we just don't know yet," Daniels said.
The Civil Defense spokesman said the Avensa airplane crashed in
clear weather at the end of 220-mile flight from Caracas.

He said 17 people were injured in the crash, including the pilot, Jose
Albornoz, who escaped with a co-pilot and stewardess through a window of
the DC-9 aircraft.
Fifteen other people aboard the plane escaped unharmed, he said.
An aviation spokesman said experts from the U.S. National Transpor-
tation Safety Board were en route to help investigate the cause of the crash.
-- be 31rb1┬žan'afIQ
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
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University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109. Sub-
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:,

Q~urrcb imatin ipruuai

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave., 662-4466
(between S. University and Hill)
Campus/Career Fellowship
Coordinator: Steve Spina
Sunday a.m.
Sunday 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Coffee Hour-10:30 social hall
Wednesday p.m.
8:00-Allelous (Christian Fellow-
ships), French Room.
8:30-Study/Discussion Groups
9:30-Holy Communion, sanctuary
* *
ST. MARY'S
STUDENT CHAPEL
(Catholic)
331 Thompson-663-0557
Weekly Masses:
Mon.-Wed.-5:10p.m.
Thurs.-Fri.-12:10 p.m.
Sat.-7:00 p.m.
Sun.-8:30 and 10:30 a.m. (Upstairs
and downstairs)
12 noon and 5 p.m. (upstairs and
downstairs)
North Campus Mass at 9:30 a.m. in
Bursley Hall (Fall and Winter Terms)
Rite of Reconciliation-4 p.m.-5 p.m.
on Friday only; any other time by
appointment.

UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1101 E. Huron
(corner of Fletcher & Huron)
Gene Terpstra, Pastor
9:00 a.m. Sundays - Church School
10:30 a.m. - Morning Worship
Wednesdays - Noon Communion (in
church house behind URC)
small support groups available- call
(662-3153) for more information
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
AMERICAN BAPTIST CAMPUS
FOUNDATION
502 East Huron, 663-9376
March 13: "A Series To The Cross".
Part III: "Caessarea Philippi".
Student Study Group-Thursday 6:00
p.m.
9:55 a.m. Sunday Worship. Child care
provided.
11:00 a.m.-Church School. Classes
for all ages. Class for undergraduates.
Class for graduates and faculty.
Also:
Choir Thursday 7:15 p.m., John Reed,
director; Janice Beck, organist.
Ministry Assistants: Marlene Francis,
Terry Ging, Barbara Griffen, Jerry
Rees.

CAMPUS CHAPEL
1236 Washtenaw Ct.
A Campus Ministry of the
Christian Reformed Church
Pastor: Reverend Don Postema
10 a.m. Morning Service 6:00 p.m.,
Evening Service
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN
(The Campus Ministry
of the LCA-ALC-AELC)
Galen Hora, Pastor
801 S. Forest at Hill St. 668-7622
Sunday - Worship at 10:30 a.m.
Martin Luther addrsssing the Church
Program at 7 p.m. (at University.
Lutheran).
Mon. 1-2 p.m. Bibly Study, Room 3,
Michigan League.
Wed., 6 p.m., Agape Meal; 7:30 Choir.
Fri. 7 p.m., Volleyball.
* * *
NEW GRACE APOSTOLIC CHURCH
632 N. Fourth Ave.
Rev. Avery Dumas Jr., Pastor*
9:45 a.m. Sunday School.
11:45 Morning Worship
7:00 p.m. Evening Service
Bible Study-Wed. & Fri. 7 p.m.
For rides call 761-1530
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
120 S. State St.
(Corner of State and Huron)
Worship Schedule:
Guest Speaker: .Dr. Donald B. Strobe
March 13-"On Panicking Close to
Shore."
Church School for all ages-9:30 a.m.
and 11:00 a.m.
Choir Rehearsal-Thursday at
7:15 p.m.
Ministers:
Dr. Donald B. Strobe
Rev. Fred B. Maitland
Dr. Gerald R. Parker
Education Directors:
Rose McLean and Carol Bennington
* * *
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw
Robert Kavasch, Pastor
Sunday services 9:15 a.m. and 10:30
a.m.
Sunday morning Bible Study 9:15
a. m.
Wed. Evening Lenten Service, 7 p.m.
Thursday evening Bible Study 9:00
p.m.

be denied aid.
Government officials
500,000 students nationwide
registered for the draft.

estimate
have not

CATHOLIC
OPEN HOUSE
All Catholic
Churches

Wayne State
divests of its
stock in firms
in S Africa
(Continued from Page 1)
ments."
A spokesman for.WSU, Bob Warner,
said the divestment was a reaction by
the university "against discrimination
in those countries" and had little to do
with the state law.
Warner said the WSU divestment in-
volves about $1.9 million invested in 11
different corporations. He said Wayne
State has already begun a search for
alternate investments and has set April
1, 1984, as the deadline for re-
investment.
EINHEUSER said he doubted the af-
fected corporations would take any
retaliatory action for the sale of the
stocks, such as withdrawing funds for
research.
"We supply the people who populate
industry," he said. "Corporations who
support the university realize the prin-
ciple of teaching are in concert with
their goals."
Einheuser said he could not predict
how the decision might affect policy at
the University of Michigan.
Police
notes..
Indecent exposure
A man said to be in his mid-twenties
was seen masturbating on the second
floor of the C.C. Little Building late
Wednesday night. The suspect was ob-
served by a woman who quickly left the
area and called police.The man had left

I4

14

Editor-in'chief.

BARRY WITT

Managing Editor......................JANET RAE
Opinion Page Editors ................KENT REDDING
DAVID SPAK
University Editor ............... FANNIE WEINSTEIN
News Editor GEORGE ADAMS
Student Affairs Editor .......... BETH ALLEN
Arts Magazine Editor ................. BEN TICHO
Associate Arts/Magazine Editors LARRY DEAN
MARE HODGES
SUSAN MAKUCH
Sports Editor.............. ..........JOHNRKERR
Associate Sports Editors.. .....JIM DWORMAN
LARRY FREED
CHUCK JAFFE

son Faye. Chris Gerbasi. Paul Helgren. Steve Hunter.
Doug Levy, Tim Makinen, Mike McGraw, Rob Pollard
Dan Price. Paul Resnick, Scott Salowich, Amy Schiff,
Paulo Schipper, Adorn Schwartz. John Toyer. Steve
Wise.

BUSINESS MANAGER.
SALES MANAGER ..

S,

CLASSIFIEDS MANAGER ....,
OPERATIONS MANAGER
DISPLAY MANAGER .....
NATIONAL MANAGER.
FINANCE MANAGER.......
ASSISTANT DISPLAY MANAGER
ASSISTANT FINANCE MANAGER.
SALES COORDINATOR ....E

AM G. SLAUGHTER IV
...MEG GIBSON
..PAM GILLERY
LAURIE ICZKOVITZ
JEFF VOIGT
..... GITA PILLAI
MARK HORITA
NANCY GUSSIN
S . JOE TRULIK
E.ANDREW PETERSEN

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