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March 12, 1983 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1983-03-12

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I

The Michigan Daily-Saturday, March 12, 1983-Page 3
Cambridge University to
accept 'U' women in fall

By JERRY ALIOTTA
Who says dreams can't come true?
Studlents longing to attend England's
reknowned Cambridge University can
now make that fantasy a reality, thanks
to the University's Center for Western
European Studies.
New Hall College, one of 26 colleges
at Cambridge University, has agreed to
accept qualified female University of
Michigan students for study in England
during the 1983-84 academic year.
"THE PRESTIGE of Cambridge is
fairly high," said Henry Peiter, literary
administrator in the Center for Western
European Studies. "It used to be im-
possible for students to study at Oxford
or Cambridge."
Each college at Cambridge decides

their own policies, Peiter said, and New
Hall only allows female students to ap-
ply for admission. But he said the Cen-
ter will be negotiating with other
colleges, co-ed and male, to try and
reach other agreements with Cam-
bridge University.
The University is now one of very few
colleges in the nation able to send
students to Cambridge. "Fall of '83 will
be the first opportunity for students at
the University of Michigan to attend a
prestigious college in Britain," Peiter
said.
STUDENTS WHO wish to apply for
the study abroad program must have a
minimum 3 25 grade-point average,
Peiter said. He said students accepted
to the college will be able to use any
scholarship they prsently have.

Although the University's
requirements for the program are
fairly moderate, Cambridge Univer-
sity's standards are stricter: Of the six
U.S. students allowed into New Hall
College, only two will come from the
University of Michigan.
Peiter said admission will be very,-
competitive, but "We probably won't.
have any more students than usual ap-
plying because applicant requirements
(of Cambridge University) are more
stringent."
Applications are being accepted at
the Center for Western European
Studies, which will decide on can-
didates for the program and then for-
ward the applications to Cambridge for
final selectiop.

AP Photo
A Colorado state patrolman surveys the damage in a University of Southern Colorado dorm fire yesterday. Officials
suspect arson may have been involved.
33 injured in dorm fire

Calvin College shuts
down student paper

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From AP and UPI
PUEBLO, Colo. - Officials suspect
that a dormitory fire which injured 33
students yesterday may have been set
by two male students seeking
revenge.
Three students were critically in-
jured by the fire. Witnesses said the
lawn outside the four-story Belmont
Residence Hall was littered with vic-
tims waiting for ambulances.
"I heard screaming in the hall. I
opened the door and saw flames and a
bunch of smoke rush in," freshman
Karen Davis said from a hospital bed,
adding that the alarm in her hall
didn't go off. "I slammed the door,
rolled the window open and jumped
out."
FIRE CHIEF Robert Drake said
two male students were suspects. He
said at least two of the injured women
students were arson targets. Asked
what the motive might have been,

Drake replied: "Envy, jealousy,
revenge and hatred. They've got all
kinds of social problems in there." He
declined to elaborate.
Most of the students were injured
leaping out windows to safety. One
was in critical condition with smoke
inhalation and three more were
serious with burns.
THE BLAZE, controlled by
firefighters about 40 minutes after it
began at 2:30 a.m. MST, was the
latest in a series of at least four set by
an arsonist in the past 10 days. The
others, all set in trash cans, caused no
damage.
All four of the previous fires were
set in a trash can in a closet on the B
wing, one of three wings housing
women students. The other fires had
done only minor damage, but the
students were frightened and on
Thursday they decided to have the
door to the closet locked at night.
Early yesterday two fires were
set-one in a bedroom on the wing and

the other outside the locked door of
the closet. Flames from the two fires
raced toward each other down a
hallway, Drake said.
"THE FIRE spread really
quickly," said Marjorie Cortez, a
junior. "People had to jump out of
windows because they couldn't get out
doors since the fire was in the hall. I
saw mattresses on the ground and
people who had broken limbs and
back injuries."
Although the fire was on the second
floor, some students jumped from
higher floors.
"WE DON'T KNOW if it's revenge
or if someone's gone berserk," said
Davis, admitted to St. Mary-Corwin
Hospital for treatment of burns and
smoke inhalation.
Twenty-eight students were admit-
ted at two hospitals for treatment of
burns, smoke inhalation and broken
bones. The dormitory housed 525
people.

.-I

GRAND RAPIDS (UPI)-Officials at
Calvin College have shut down the
student newspaper and disbanded its
staff for defying a school order against
publishing articles about confiden-
tiality in the college's counseling
system.
Calvin President Anthony Diekema
said the ruling against The Chimes was
made by the college's communications
board in response to articles and
editorials that appeared in the March 4
issue.
"The present staff has been disban-
ded and the publication suspended until
there is a new editor-in-chief,"
Diekema said.
KEITH ESSENBURG, associate
editor of The Chimes, said rumors that
a chaplain might have revealed infor-
mation that was given him in confiden-
ce began circulating around the college
about a month ago.
When the newspaper began to in-
vestigate those rumors it "found a lot of
hesitation on the part of the ad-
ministration to discuss it," Essenburg
said.
Although the newspaper was unable
to confirm the rumors, editor Rod
Ludema wrote an editorial on the issue
of confidentiality in the school's coun-
seling system. The editorial also con-
tained information regarding a
professor who had resigned, reportedly
over the breach of confidence issue.
LUDEMA SAID the paper's adviser,
Charles Stridwerda, turned the
editorial over to Diekema when the
students presented it to him for review.
Ludema said he softened the language
and resubmitted the article at
Diekem's request.
T HE DA ILY
CL ASSIF IEDS
A RE A GR EAT
WAY TO GE T
FAST RESULTS
CA LL 764-0557

After the revised article was submit-
ted, the communications board said
again it should not be printed, Ludema
said.
Ludema said he took the dispute to
the staff, which voted 7-5 in favor of
running the articles without board ap-
proval. In all, the paper contained two
editorials, two articles and an "Open
Letter to the President" on the issue.
LUDEMA AND ESSENBURG said
security and maintenance personnel
"all around campus" attempted to
confiscate the papers when they were
distributed on March 4.
Diekema said The Chimes staff had
the faces of the issue wrong and wrote
an editorial based on "pure rumor." He
said the editors "had every opportunity
to get the facts and yet did not take
cognizance of that."
Calvin College, which is operated by
the Christian Reformed Church in Nor-
th America, has an enrollment of 3,800
students.

K

i I

A ROMANTIC COMEDY
FOR THE INCURABLY
ROMANTIC!
DUDLEY
MOOR E
LOVE
SICK(
(PG
FRI MON - 6:45 8:30 10:15
SAT SUN -
1:20, 3:05, 4:50, 6:45, 8:30,10:15

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7}

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1

McCarthy says
(Continued from Page 1)

stepping on a human face forever."
The boot refers to Bingo's
domineering nature, Beauchamp said.
"The scale was smaller, but the essen-
ce was the same."
Former Sen. McCarthy opened his
.remarks by mentioning five ways in-
which the world described in 1984 is
already here.
GOVERNMENT USE of language
resembles the "doubletalk" and
"newspeak" of 1984, he said. "During
the Vietnam war, soldiers were told,

AN ARBOR
2 INDIIDUAL THEATRES
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before 6:00 PM

'Don't generate an
said, stressing the w
"That's just a
responsibility," he s
Government lang
weapons also resen
he said. McCa
changing the terms
destructive capa
weapons from
"kilotons" to "meg
number in front can
He said another

"1984'is now
zy prisoners,' "'he has become reality is an increase in
vord "generate." corporate power. "We don't realize the
waord 'gvner di extent of corporate control of American
way of avoiding life," he said.
uage about nuclear AS HE DID in an earlier press con-
gbles "newsp eak," ference, McCarthy sharply criticized
rthy condemned television news for its simplistic
whichndescribe the descriptions of important events.
cis of nuclear "They should allow 30 seconds after
citiers of nucato each story to think about it, instead of
Hatons... just so the cutting to a commercial about mint-
get smaller." flavored Pepsodent."
get sn which 1984 He warned of government
bureaucracy creeping into the
everyday lives of American citizens.
"fl.1 'fLe-trany-0- te- mjorty-ve

BEST A
MERYL
"MAGNI
Ger
SOPHIE'5
.CHOIE
FRI MON - 6:45, 9
SAT SUN -
1:00, 3:50, 6:45, 9

ACADEMY
AWARD
NOMINATIONS
INCL.
CTRESS
STREEP
FICEN TI"
ne Shalit, NBC-TV
(R)
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4:30

Complete.
Stop by this week and ask why.
Theta Xi
FRAI'EIRNITY
S. University at Wshtenaw

I HAPPENINGS-
Highlight
Michigras finishes up today and tonight with everything from a "hot legs"
contest to a Battle of the Bands. Zeta Beta Tau is sponsoring a 12-hour dance
contest in the Anderson Room of the Michigan Union starting at 1 p.m. A
casino opens in the Union's Grand Ballroom at 7:30 p.m., as does an arcade
in the Pendleton Room and a poker contest in the Terrace Rooms. The final
event, a champagne brunch in the Union, will begin at midnight.
Films
Wolverine Films - Up In Smoke, 7,8:40, & 10:20 p.m., Nat. Sci. Aud.
Alternative Action - Dersu Uzala, 7 & 9:30 p.m., MLB 4.
Mediatrics - Blade Runner, & 9 p.m., MLB 3.
Cinema Two - Body Heat, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Lorch.
Gargoyle - Swept Away, 7 & 9:15 p.m., Hutchins Hall.
Hill Street Cinema - Swept Away, 7 & 9:15 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
Ann Arbor Film Co-op - Tron, 7 & 9 p.m., Angell Aud. A.
Cinema Guild - 21st Annual 16mm Film Festival, 1, 7, & 9 p.m., Michigan
Theatre.
Performances
Office of Major Events - Phoebe Snow in concert, 8 p.m., Power Center.
Music at Michigan - harp recital, Rebecca Bard, 2 p.m.; oboe recital,
Suzanne Lemieux, 4 p.m.; trumpet recital, Brian Rood, 6 p.m.; cello recital,
Eliana Mendoza, 8 p.m.; all in the Recital Hall.
Performance Network - "The Mother Lode," 8 p.m., 408 W. Washington.
Ark - "Ramblin' Jack Elliott," 9 p.m., 1421 Hill.
Dept. of Theatre & Drama - "The Father," 8p.m., Trueblood Theatre.
Canterbury Loft - Solo Alliance, a concert of dance and other media, 8
p.m., 332 S. State, second floor.
Speakers
Gray Panthers - Jimmy Spearow and Cheryl Newell, "Food and World
Instability," 3 p.m., Ann Arbor Firehouse.
Miscellaneous
Folk Dance Club - workshops with Camille Brochu at 10 a.m., 2 & 8 p.m.,
210/216 Fourth Ave.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of
Iappenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.

"It's the tyranny of the majority over
the majority," he said.
"I said in '64 that 1984 will not hap-
pen, but here we are on the edge," Mc-
Carthy said.
The conference concludes this mor-
ning with a session called "The Future
of 1984."

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