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March 23, 1982 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-03-23

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Page 2-Tuesday, March 23, 1982-The Michigan Daily
'U' prof completes

study of U.1'
(Continued from Page 1)
depended on themselves as individuals
rather than on the success of the race
overall.
Jackson's study found that older
blacks, poorer blacks, and less
educated blacks, were all generally
happier with their lives than younger
blacks, wealthier blacks, or better
educated blacks.
"WE DID not expect these results
when we began this survey," Jackson
said Friday. But Jackson added that
age, income, and level of education
generally proved to be poor indicators
of satisfaction with life for black
Americans.
Earlier studies of white Americans,
however, indicate that age, education,
and income often directly correspond to
happiness and level of satisfaction.
Therefore, the usual socio-economic
indicators for determining levels of
hapl mness are not applicable to black
Americans, according to the study.
For the study, called the National
Survey of Black Americans, Jackson

S. blacks
randomly selected more than 2,000
American blacks, each of whom was in-
terviewed for two-and-a-half hours.
THE STUDY incorporates national
surveys of the adult black population,
elderly blacks, and three generations of
black Americans in "the most exten-
sive study of its kind ever conducted on
this segment of the population,"
Jackson said.
Thestudy has been conducted over a
two-year period and Jackson em-
phasized that his current findings are
still preliminary. Jackson said he
began to develop the idea for the survey
in 1973, when he and his colleagues were
dissatisfied with existing survey data
on black Americans because, he said,
they were too narrow. These surveys
usually focused on specific population
groups, he said, such as southern
blacks or urban blacks.
Jackson, a University psychology
professor, warned that the survey's
findings might be easily misinterpreted
if any of the study's 1,500 variables are
overlooked.

U

I

t Co ~ing"
March 27
MORE THAN A BOOKSTORE '

L'

J

Daily Photo by JEFF SCHRIER
NUCLEAR WEAPONS freeze advocate Dave Lehman distributes flyers on
tie Diag yesterday advertising the kickoff of a petition drive designed
ultimately to send a message to Washington advocating a halt to nuclear
weapon production.
Nuclear weapons freeze
campaign begins at 'U'

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
East Europe backs mike plants:
VIENNA, Austria- While plans for nuclear plants are being abandoned in
the West because of growing expense and opposition, Eastern Europe is
forging ahead with ambitious nuclear power projects.
The communist countries of Eastern Europe are planning to sharply in-
crease their reliance on nuclear power, and have set high goals for expan-
sion.
According to figures available from the Vienna-based International
Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), there are 46 nuclear power plants in
Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. Forty more are under construction.
Salvadoran army attacks
province
SAN SALVADOR, El Salvador- Two thousand Salvadoran troops, in-
cluding a U.S.-trained brigade, swept through a northern province yesterday
in a new military offensive near where four Dutch journalists were killed,
authorities said.
In the northern Chalatenango province, military commanders said the
government's latest 2,000-man offensive converged on the towns of Arcatao,
Las Vueltas and Las Flores, all about 40 miles northeast of the capital and
only a few miles from the Honduran border.
Nicaraguan, Honduran forces
clash
MANAGUA, Nicaragua- Honduran war jets and a Nicaraguan gunboat
clashed off the Caribbean coast in the second armed confrontation in a week
between the increasingly belligerent neighbors, authorities from both coun-
tries said yesterday.
The Nicaraguan Defense Ministry said its boat was attacked by three
Honduran Super Mystere jets Sunday and shot back, hitting and possibly
downing one of the planes.
Honduras said Nicaraguan gunboats fired first and denied any of its
planes were hit.
The clash came amid charges by the leftist Sandinista government that
the United States was planning an "imminent" invasion of Nicaragua from
Honduran bases, led by exiled Nicaraguan rightists.
On Friday, Nicaragua demanded an emergency meeting of the U.N.
Security Council to discuss the accusation.
ERA backers vow not to give up
WASHINGTON - Supporters of the Equal Rights Amendment vowed
yesterday to reintroduce the ERA in Congress and make it an issue in the
1982 campaign if the amendment fails to pass in the 100 days remaining.
"If you think we're quitting on June 30th, forget it," Rep. Pat Schroeder
(D-Colo.) told a news conference. June 30 is the deadline for getting three
more states to ratify the proposed consitituional amendment.
ERA supporters were-asking members of Congress to sign a letter telling
state legislators, "The issue will not die. The debate will continue as lively
as ever."
"If the ERA is not ratified, it will be an issue in the 1982 campaign. The
polls indicate that in many races it will be a decisive issue."
UAW executives to review pact
DETROIT - Rank-and-file General Motors Corp. workers yesterday both
praised and damned the as yet unratified concessionary contract approved
during the weekend by United Auto Workers and company bargainers.
Industry observers said the contract would save nearly 11,000 jobs and
possibly lower car prices in return for as much as $3 billion in union con-
cessions.
The union's International Executive Council met to review the 30-month
pact that was unanimously approved by the UAW's bargaining committee
Sunday night.
Vol. XCII, No. 135
Tuesday, March 23, 1982
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The Univer-
sity of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during
the University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan. 49109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters) ; $13 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
nings. Subscription rates: $6.50 in Ann Arbor; $7 by mail outside Ann Arbor.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan POSTMASTER: Send
address changes to THE MICHIGAN DAILY, 420 Maynard Street. Ann Ar-
bor, MI 48109.
The Michigan Doily is a member of the Associated Press and subscrides to United Press lnterntional
Pacific News Service. Los Angeles Times Syndicate and Field Newspapers Surdicae.
News room (313) 764-0552. 76-DAILY. Sports desk 764-0562: Circulation. 764-0558 Classified Advertising
764-0557. Display advertising. 764-0554; Billing. 764-0550.

PLAY,
UNIVERSITY PASSWORD

Last week's
UNIVERSITY
PASSWORD
was...
ROBOTICS

N

I

I

Last week's winners
were:
Sarat Khilnani
Rita Markel
Chris Ackerman

(Continued from Page 1)
program as an assurance that the coun-
try is behind him on defense issues.
"Reagan is using wyhat is a purely
economical mandate to do other
things," Hathaway claimed.
The organizers of the campus cam-
paign said they hope to collect 10,000 of
the 230,000 signatures required
statewide to put the proposal on the
ballot.
ANOTHER group working for the
Michigan nuclear weapons freeze cam-
paign - the Interfaith Council for
Peace - already has collected betwen

look for clues hidden in the Daily Classifieds page
ITvesday through Friday.

I.

three and four thousand signatures in
Washtenaw County.
Meanwhile, in Washington, Senate
supporters of a nuclear weapons freeze
said yesterday Congress must catch up
with public sentiment for a halt in the
arms race.
"We must stop treating the
possibility of a nucler conflict as an ac-
ceptable option," Sen Edward Kennedy
(D-Mass) said.
Sen Mark Hatfield (R-Ore.) said a
freeze followed by mutual
reductionsfofdthe U.S.mand
Soviet nuclear arsenals offers "the
most practical, meaningful, way" to
begin arms reduction. He and Kennedy
have proposed such a freeze in a
resolution co-sponsored by 171 other
members of Congress.
Rep. Albert Gore (D-Tenn.) also in-
troduced yesterday what he called a
"Modified moratorium" proposal on
nucler weapons.
Gore proposed a moratorium of four
or five years during which neither side
would add to the number of weapons or
warheads, But could continue research
and development as a hedge against the
possible collapse of negotiations on a
weapons reduction plan.
FOUR HIROSHIMA survivors,
testifying at the start of a public forum
chaired by Kennedy and Hatfield, told
in emotional detail how they lived
through "hell on Earth" in August 1945.
"I saw the city was no more,"'said
Dr. Mytsuo Tomosawa, now an op-
temetrist in Watsonville, Calif.
Tomosawa, who was 15 at the time,
said the night after the blast "we
couldn't sleep for the moaning of all
those people" in a nearby hospital.
"It looked just like hell - hell on this
earth. The city was turned into a desert
of death," he said. -

Student Newspdper at The University of Michigan
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Each group of characters counts as one word. Hyphenated words over five characters count as two words. (this
includes telephone numbers). Seven words equal one line.
Advertisement may be removed from publication. For ads which required prepayment, there will be no refunds.
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Editor-in-Chief.......................DAVID MEYER
Monoging Editor ..................PAMELA KRAMER
Executive Editor...............CHARLES THOMSON
Student Affairs Editor ....... ANN MARIE FAZIO
University Editor.. . ................. MARK GINDIN
Opinion Page Editors...........ANDREW CHAPMAN

Arts Editors ........ . .
Sports Editor
Associate Sports Editors.

JULIE HINDS
.. RICHARD CAMPBELL
MICHAEL HUGET
bOB WOJNOWSKI
BARB BARKER
MARTHA CRAL.
LARRY FREED
JOHN KERR
RON POLLACK

ARTS STAFF Tonio Blonich, Jone Carl. James Clinton.
Mark Dighton, Adam Knee, Gail Negbour. Carol
Ponemon. Ben Ticho.
SPORTS STAFF ,Jesse Barkin Tom Bentley Jeff
Bergido. Randy Berger, Mork Borowski Joe Chopelle
Laura Clark Richard Demok. Jim Dwormon Laun
Fainblatt. Mark Fischer David Forman Chris Gerbasi
Paul Helgren. Matt Henehon. Ciuck Jaffe. Steve
Kamen. Josh .Kaplan, Robin Kopiinick Doug Levy
Mike McGraw. Larry Mi-hki non Newman Andrew
Ookes, Jeff Quicksilver. Sarah Sherber. Georgg
Tonosijevich. James Thompson Karl Wheatley Chas
Wilson. Chuck Whittman.
BUSINESS STAFF

0

E. Ann residents burglarized,
again
Another burglary occured in thE
1100 block of E. Ann Street last week.
Thieves broke into an apartment and
took a telephone, a tool box, a leather
coat and corduroy coat with a total
value of $619. The robbery occured last
Thursday but was not reported until the
weekend.
This block which includes a mental
health research building and Couzens
Hall dormitory, has been hit with a
series of thefts and break-ins in recent
months.

Chief Photographer ..................BRIAN MASCK
PHOTOGRAPHERS: Jackie Bell. Kim Hill. Deborah
Lewis, Mike Lucas. Jeff Schrier.
ASSISTANT PHOTOGRAPHERS: Linda Kelley, Doug
MaMahon, Avi Pelosoff, Elizabeth Scott, Jon Snow.
Diane Williams.
ARTISTS Norm Christions. Robert Lence Jonathon
Stewart. Richard Walk
LIBRARIANS: Bonnie Hawkins, Gary Schmitz.
NEWS STAFF: John Adam. George Adams. Jason
Adkins, Beth Allen. Perry Clark. Poe Coughlin. David
Crawford, Lisa Crumrine. Pom Fickinger. Lou Fintor,
Steve Hook. Kathlyn Hoover. Harlon Kahn, Indre
Liutkus, Nancy Molich. Mike McIntyre. Jenny Miller.
Amy Moon. Anne Mytych. Nancy Newman. Don
Oberrotmon. Stacy Powell. Janet Rae. Lauren
Rousseu. Chris Solato. Jim Schreitmuel.r, Susan
Sharon. David Spak. Lisa Spector. Bill Spindfe. Kristin
Stapleton. Scott Stuckol. Fannie Weinstein. Barry Witt.
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Don Aronoff, Linda Bolkin.
Kent Redding. Nathaniel Worshoy.

Business Manager ..
Sales Manager..
Operations Manager.
Display Manager.........
Classifieds Manager.
Finance Manager ....
Assistant Display Manager.
Nationals Manager.
Circulation Manager.
Sales Coordinator ..-

....JOSEPH BRODA
KATHRYN HENDRICK
SUSAN RABUSHKA
..ANN SACHAR
MICHAEL SELTZER
.SAM SLAUGHTER
PAMELA GOULD
LINDSAY BRAY
.KIM WOODS
E. ANDREW PETERSON

SALES REPRESENTATIVES: Wendy Fox. Mark Freeman.
Nancy Joslin rBeth Kovinsky Caryn Notiss. Felice
Oper Tim Pryor, Joe Trulik. Jeff Voight.
BUSINESS STAFF: Ruth Bard, Hope Barron. Fran Bell
Molly Benson. Beth Bowman. Denise Burke. Becki
Chottiner. Marcia Eisen. Lauro Farrell. Sandy Fricka
Meg Gibson. Pam Gillery. marci Gittleman Jamie
Goldsmith. Mark Horita Laurie lczkovitz Karen John-
son. Ad Kusnetz. Gito Pillai chantelle PortesDan
Quandt. Pete Rowley. Leah Stanley. Tracy 5jmmerwill.

-ggSOOOSR0O 0A0.0-----
/Fight Preppiness~

0

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