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January 06, 1982 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1982-01-06

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4

Page 2-Wednesday, January 6, 1982-The Michigan Daily
Schmidt, Reagan blast Soviets

From AP and UPI
WASHINGTON- West German Chancellor Helmut
Schmidt joined President Reagan yesterday in
blaming the Soviet Union for the military crackdown
in Poland and said U.S. sanctions against Moscow
"serve their purpose."
Schmidt, concluding a round of meetings with
Reagan and other high U.S. officials, did not,
however, commit West Germany to a set of punitive
sanctions against the Soviets similar to those already
invoked by Reagan.
NONETHELESS, he took advantage of a news con-
ference to strongly disavow,.published reports of a
serious, alliance-threatening rift between West Ger-
many and the United States on the sanctions issue
and on Soviet involvement in the Polish crackdown.
In a joint communique, Schmidt and Reagan called
the developments in Poland a serious violation of the
Helsinki agreements to uphold human rights and said
the foreign ministers of the 35 signers of the accord
should convene in Madrid "to deal with the situation
as soon as possible."
And they said their two nations will go before the
United Nations "with a view to denouncing the

violation of human rights as well as acts of violence."
REAGAN SAID they held a thorough discussion of
the Polish crisis "and the need for forceful Western
measures to induce both the Polish and Soviet
authorities to lift martial law, release all those who
have been detained and periit resumption of a
national dialogue leading to genuine reform."
Schmidt, minimizing complaints he made earlier in
the day about Washington's failure to consult with its
allies before imposing economic sanctions on Poland
and the Soviets,.said he fully subscribed to Reagan's
view.
Schmidt said he and Reagan "did agree on the fact
of Soviet pressure" on the authorities in Warsaw to
invoke martial law to break the Solidarity labor
union.
"IT IS OBVIOUS that the action would not have
taken place without strong Soviet pressure," he said.
Meanwhile, in Poland, martial law authorities are
moving Lech Walesa-every few days for fear he may
try to escape and they plan to isolate him in a
secluded monastery under church protection, reports
from that country said yesterday.
It is not known if he is among the militants the

Communist regime is considering -expelling to the
West.
THE REPORT on Walesa's being moved came
from the French newspaper Le Matin which also said
Walesa fears being drugged. It quoted a Roman
Catholic priest close to Walesa as saying Walesa's
quarters in Warsaw are changed every two or three
days because the authorities fear he may try to break
out.
The paper said both Walesa's wife and the priest
reported Walesa was willing to open talks with the
military authorities if they include Solidarity leaders
now in jail and Poland's Roman Catholic primate,
Archibishop Jozef Glemp. But the paper said the
military has refused to accept the conditions.
Keston College, an educational charity in Kent,
England, that monitors religious activities in Com-
munist states, said it learned that Polish authorities
intend to move Walesa to a secluded monastery
where he is to be held under the protection of the
church.
It said the authorities agreed to the move on con-'
dition that he is allowed no communication with the
outside world.

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By JULIE HINDS
A rally for the Polish labor union
Solidarity will be held at noon on the
FUTS! Diag tomorrow, featuring a Solidarity
member speaking on the current crisis
in Poland.
rs The guest speaker at tomorrow's
rally, sponsored by the Polish-
American Student Association, will be
Richard Knauff, a Solidarity member
and founder of an underground
publishing house in Poland.
KNAUFF LEFT Poland a few weeks
before the Polish government declared
Huo martial law and stopped com-
HU ron munications . with the West, according
845to History Prof. Andrew Ehrenkreutz,
8 4 who will host Knauff during his stay in
kRBOR Ann Arbor.
Knauff was sent abroad by Solidarity
to make contacts with American
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filmmakers, Ehrenkrevtz said.
"Knauff's function as an under-
ground publisher was important in
creating the climate for Solidarity to
thrive," Ehrenkreutz said, adding that
his publishing work helped spread
Western thought in Poland.
EHRENKREUTZ said Knauff's work
involved some dangers. "He was
arrested and released, arrested and
released," Ehrenkreutz said.
Knauff's fellow Solidarity member
Miroslaw Chojecki was originally
scheduled to speak at the rally, but
cancelled to attend a meeting in
Brussels of Solidarity leaders outside
Poland.
Ann Arbor Mayor Louis Belcher and
state Senator Edward Pierce will also
speak.at the rally. Solidarity t-shirts,
buttons, and bumper stickers will be on
sale. during the rally, with proceeds
going to Solidarity groups in the West
said John Misteravich, Polish-
American Student Association
President. The Orient Express
restaurant is also donating food to be
sold at the rally, said owner Lok Lau.
"The main focus is not to raise
money," Misteravich said. "We want
to show support and show that the
people in America care about Solid-
4arity and give moral and financial
support."

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Midwest, West dig out of storm
The West and Midwest began digging out yesterday from mounds of mud
and snow piled up in the regions' most devastating storms in decades. The
dual assaults dumped up to 15 inches of rain in California, nearly 11/2 feet of
snow in Wisconsin, killed scores, and left property damage in the uncounted
millions.
Storms that began their siege during the weekend and rose to full fury
Monday contributed to at least 74 deaths.
Light drizzle sprinkled San Francisco and points south, hardest hit by a
rainstorm that slammed ashore Sunday, spewing a sea of mud and water.
Hundreds of homes were washed away, bridges were wiped out and power
was knocked out to thousands
Woman arrested for role
in nursing home scam
PONTIAC- Cora Collins, a Florida woman who has allegedly used more
than 30 aliases and is accused of bilking dozens of elderly people out of their
life savings, was arrested yesterday in Arizona, officials said.
Collins, believed to be in her 60's, was arrested by police in Florence, Ariz.4
about 60 miles north of Phoenix where she was operating a nursing home.
which was allegedly not licensed by the state, Oakland County Prosecutor L.
Brooks Patterson said at a news conference.
Collins, who was also known as Lucille Walker and Cora Galvin, was
arrested under the name of Sylvia Kimball, Pinal County Sheriff's deputies
said.
Small cars more dangerous
than large vehicles, report says
WASHINGTON- Motorists in small cars are twice as likely to be killed in
accidents as those in full-size models, and Japanese autos are generally less
safe than their American counterparts, according to a new insurance in-
dustry study released yesterday.
The study is based on claims submitted to 10 insurance companies, han-
dling half of the nation's auto policies, from 1978 through 1980..
The study was released by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety and
the United Services Automobile Association, the country's ninth largest in-
surer of automobiles.
Anti-Semitic aets doubled
in 1981 survey says
NEW YORK- For the third straight year, reported acts of anti-Semitism
in the United States more than doubled in 1981, marked by an increase in
violence against Jews and Jewish institutions, the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith reported yesterday.
Anti-Semitism "has always been there," said Nathan Perlmutter, league
national director.
Lately, he added, "it's coming out of the closet."
The league's annual audit cited 974 cases of anti-Jewish vandalism and 350
attacks on or threats against "Jews as Jews" in 31 states and Washington,'
D.C., last year. In 1980 the league found 377 cases of vandalism and 112
assaults.
Government accuses Alabama
of college segregation
WASHINGTON- The Education Department accused Alabama yester-
day of failing to eliminate student and faculty segregation in its public
college and universities.
The agency, acting under a deadline set by a federal judge, asked the
Justice Department to begin legal enforcement proceedings against the
state for failing to submit an acceptable desegregation plan.
Alabama, like most other states in the South, once maintained a separate
college system for blacks. It was one of several Southern and border states
which the Carter administration, in its final days a year ago, asked to submit
a plan for eliminating vestiges of segregation in their colleges.

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Vol. XCII, No.54
Wednesday, November 11,198
The Michigan Daily is-edited and managed by students at The Univer-
sity of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during
the University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 49109. Sub-
scription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail out-
side Ann Arbor. Summer session published Tuesday through Saturday mor-
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Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Michigan. POSTMASTER: Send
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The Michigan Ilily is a member of the Associated Press and subscribes to United Press International,
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News room: (313) 764-0552; 76-DAILY, Sports desk, 764-0562; Circulation, 764-0558: Classified Advertising,
.764-0557; Display advertising. 764-0554; Billing, 764-0550.

S
S

Editor~in-chief ......
Managing Editor ...
University Editor.
News Editor ......
Opinion Page Editors ..
Sports Editor .. . ....
Associate Sports Editors
Chief Photographer ....

....SARA ANSPACH
......JULIE ENGEBRECHT
.LORENZO GENET
......DAVID MEYER
.CHARLES THOMSON
KEVIN TOTTIS
MARK MIHANOVIC
.... GREG DeGULIS
MARK FISCHER
BUDDY MOOREHOUSE
DREW SHARP
...PAUL ENGSTROM

PHOTOGRAPHERS-Jackie Bell. Kim Hill. Deborah
Lewis.Mike Lucas. Brian Masck.
ARTISTS Robert Lence, Jonathon Stewart, Richard
Walk. Norm Christiansen.
ARTS STAFF:Richard Campbell.Jane Corl: James Clin-
ton. Mark Dighton. Michael Huget. Adom Knee. Pom
Kramer. Gail Negbaur, Carol Poneman. RJ Smith. Sen
Ticho.
NEWS STAFF: John Adam Beth Allen. Julie Borth.
Andrew Chapman. Lisa Crumrine, Ann Marie Fazio,
Pom Fickinger. Joyce Frieden Mark Gindin, Julie Hin.
ds, Steve Hook. Kathlyn Hoover. Harlan Kahn. Mincy
Layne. Mike McIntyre. Jennifer Miller. Dan Oberrot-
man. Stacy Powell. Janet Roe David Spok.Fannie
Weinstein. Barry Witt.

SPORTS STAFF: Barb Barker. Jesse Borkin, Tam Ben-
tley, Randy Berger, Mork Borowski, Joe Chapelle,
Laura Clark, Martha Crall. Jim Dworman, Karen Floch.
Larry Freed. Matt Henehan, Chuck Jaffe, John Kerr;
Doug Levy, Jim Lombard, Larry Mishkin, Dan
Newman, Andrew Oakes, Ron Pollack, Jeff
Quicksilver, Sarah Sherber, Kenny Shore, James
Thompson, Josie VonVoigtlander, Kent Walley, Karl
Wheatley, Chris Wilson, Bob Wojnowski.
BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager RANDI CIGELNIK
Sales Manager . BARB FORSLUND
Operations manager ........ SUSANNE KELLY
Display Manager...... MARY ANN MiSIEWICZ
Classifieds Manager ..DENISE SULLIVAN
Finance Manager .......... MICHAEL YORICK
Assistant Display Manager.._.._. NANCY JOSLIN.'
Nationals Manager SUSAN RABUSHKA
Circulation Manager ..... ... KIM WOODS
Sales Coordinator .....E ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Liz Altman. Hope Barron. Alan Blum.
Doniel Bowen. Lindsay Bray. Joseph Broda. Glen Can-
tor. Alexander DePillis.FSusan Epps. Wendy Fox.
Sebastian Frcka. Mark Freeman. Marci Gittelman.
Pamela Gould. Kathryn Hendrick. Anthony Interrante.
Indre- Liutkus. Beth Kovinsky.cCaryn Notiss. Felice
Oper. Jodi Pollock, Ann Sochar. Michael SoviM t
Michael Seltzer, Karen Silverstein. Sam Slaughter,
Nancy Thompson. Jeffrey Voight

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PUBLICATION SCHEDULE
1981
T FS M TWTFS SMTWTF S S MTWTFS
SEPTEMBER OCTOBER NOVEMBER DECEMBER
723 345647 12345
1-~--- 017t12 4 67 89710 8*7077 2713714 6 B 0It1 .
/3J J5i 118 19 -11 3714757167 75 t 7778 79 20 21 --i4 2
24 25 26 18 20 2 22 23 24 22 2425 --26
W2
JANUARY FEBRUARY 1 MARCH APRIL
MTT F SI.S MAT W T F SIS M T W T S S M T4AWT F S

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