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January 06, 1982 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1982-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Judge strikes down
creation-science law

CLASSES MOVED FROM
102 ECON. BLDG.

The Michigan Daily-Wednesday, January 6, 1982-Page 3
Econ. profs lose much
more than a building

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (UPI) - A
federal judge yesterday struck down
Arkansas' creation-science law, saying
it was a blafant attempt to force
religious teaching in the public schools.
"No group, no matter how large or
small, may use the organs of gover-
nment, of which the public schools are
the most conspicuous and influential, to
force its religious beliefs on others,"
District Judge William Overton said.
THE LAW, challenged by the
American Civil Liberties Union, would
have required "balanced treatment"
for creation-science whenever
evolution was taught in public schools.
the statute, the first of its kind, was
passed . by the 1981 Arkansas
Legislature.
"The evidence is overwhelming that
both the purpose and effect of Act 590 is
the advancement of religion in the
public schools," Overton said.
Overton, a Methodist and the son of a
;biology teacher, picked apart the law's
:definition of creation-science point by

point and concluded creation-science is-
"simply not science." Instead, the
definition , "has as its unmentioned
reference the first 11 chapters of the
Book of Genesis."
ATTORNEY GENERAL Steve Clark,
who defended the law, said an appeal
was "very probable."
But ACLU attorney Jack Novik said
Overton's ruling had dealt a "fatal blow
to creation-science."
Overton said creation-science is
unified by the idea that the earth was
supernaturally created by God.
Without that concept, "the remaining
parts . . . explain nothing and are
meaningless assertions."
Those assertions include a belief that
the earth is 6,000 to 20,000 years old, the
occurence of a worldwide flood, the in-
sufficiency of mutation and natural
selection to bring about complex life
forms and a separate ancestry for man
and apes.
A similar Louisiana law has been
challenged by the ACLU.

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Graduates told they're
prepared for 'real world'
University of Chicago President
Hanna Holborn Gray told December
graduates that their liberal arts
educations would be valuable in the
world outside academics; despite the
current concern with vocationalism.
3 "The real, real world is not only the
" present, but a world to some extent
unknown and mystifying," Gray said.
"The power to deal with and to make
sense of that world, to understand
r change, to perceive connections, to
master the new and to rethink the old,
may be the most important
Y preparations we can even hope for."
"The problems addressed by poets
f and philosophers and historians, and so
many others-the enduring problems
of life and death, of choice, of the
balancing of many values, of the
struggle to define social justice and
Hanna Gray freedom - are real. They press upon
.says liberal arts valuesus"Ga sid
important
HAPPENINGS-
HIGHLIGHT
The Four Tops will appear tonight at The Second Chance, 516 E. Liberty,
for two performances at 8 and 11 p.m. tonight. Tickets are $8.50 and are
availablerat all CTC outlets.
FILMS
CFT-Aguirre, the Wrath of God, The Michigan Theatre, 4, 7, and 9 p.m.{
AAFC-The Kids Are Alright, Angell Hall, Aud. A, 6:45, 8:30, 10:20 p.m.
CG-Rebel Without a Cause, Lorch Hall, 7 & 9 p.m.
Cinema 2-To Have and Have Not, MLB 3,7 & 9 p.m.
SPEAKERS
Russian and East European Studies-Brown Bag lec., Lane Hall Com-
mons room. Noon-1 p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
UM Folklore Society-Clog Dance instruction/practice. Beginning in-
struction, 7:30-8 p.m., intermediate, 8-9:30 p.m., League Studio. For info.,
call 662-1642.
* Ark-Hoot Night, Open Mike, 1421 Hill, 9 p.m.
WCBN-"Radio Free Lawyer: Discussion of Legal Issues," 88.3 FM, 6
p.m.
Dept. of Parks and Recreation-Cross country ski instruction beginning
today at the Huron Hills Ski Center, 3465 East Huron River Drive.
Artworlds-Free photo seminar, 213 South Main, 7 p.m. Mini-
workshops-"Basic Photography," "Invitation to the Darkroom," and "In-
troduction to the Studio." For info., call 994-8400.
To submit items for the Happenings Column, send them in care of:
Happenings, The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor, MI. 48109.

601 003 F
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The above classes are all Economics.
The following classes are also involved:
Communications

(Continued from Page 1)
deal of material was saved, he said.
But Economics Prof. Gardner Ackley
described his office as "a total loss."
"Out of about 650 books, about half a
dozen were saved," Economics Prof.
Saul Hymans said of his collection. He
said he will try to replace only about 200
of the volumes because the rest only
had "a nostalgic" value. "A lot of what
you accumulate in a library has much
more sentimental value than (useful)
value," he said.
"IN A SENSE, I was more fortunate
than some of my colleagues in that
much of what I do is on the computer,"
Hymans added.
Many professors, especially those in-
volved mostly with research, credited
the computer with saving much of their
work.
Economics Prof. Joan Crary, who
works with Hymans and others on the
Michigan Econometric Model, joked
that she was lucky the Economics
Building burned down and not the com-
puting center.
CRARY SAID that although most of
her books were burned, the most impor-
tant files were either recoverable or on
computer tape.
"I'll still be discovering for marty
weeks how much I miss what's not
there," she said, but added that her
economic forecasting efforts will not be
hampered greatly because the model
and the data are on the computer.
The fire destroyed a collection of an-
nual reports on European companies
that Economics Prof. William Adams
used for much of his research. He said.
his unpublished research and the only
copy of a manuscript he was working on
were destroyed.
ALSO LOST in the flames were mid-

term exam grades from Adams': class
last term, which meant Adams could
not complete last semester's grades.
He said he is making arrangements.
with his former class members to
determine a'grade:
Most professors had already turned
in their final grades, but most final
exams themselves' were consumed ° by
the fire. Brazer said he already had one
student see him who did not understand'
how her grade was reached; but he said
there was nothing he could do.
"I guess this time the professor is'
always right," Economics Prof.'
Warren Whatley said.
To aid professors in their future
work, the department will pool
remaining resources, according to the
professors.
The Sharfman Library, which was
housed in the basement of the old
building, consisted yesterday of a few
file drawers, a box of reference
materials, and some scattered folders.
More material may yet be restored, but
the department will make a. major ef-
fort to re-establish the libraty. ,
Two professors reflected yesterday
that a stroke of luck saved them.
Fusfeld said he had completed a 40-
page article on the morning of the fire
and was going to leave it on his
secretary's desk, but decided later he
would wait until Saturday.
Economics Prof. Kenneth Boyer said
he was due to move into an office in the
Economics Building before Christmas,
but was - delayed. Boyer, who said he
can now make his journals available to
his colleagues, described himself as
being one of the lucky ones.

4

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Geography
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MH - Mason Hall

FB - Frieze Building

'U' employees fined
for raccoon killings

:..
: r r

By BETH ALLEN
District judges have fined twof
University groundskeepers who killed
two raccoons with pitchforks and
sledgehammers on North Campus lastj
October.w
One of the groundskeepers has been
fired by the University and the other
has been disciplined, said University
Grounds Manager Douglas Fasing.
Fasing would not elaborate on the firing
or the extent of the disciplinary action.
GROUNDSKEEPER Eddie Bailey
was fined $25 by 15th District Court
Judge Pieter Thomassen yesterday,
and groundskeeper William Henderson
received a $50 fine from 15th District
Court Judge Sandor Elden on Dec. 30.
Fasing refused to say which groun-
dskeeper had been fired.
The two University employees were
charged with cruelty to animals after
residents of Northwood apartments on
North Campus complained about the
deaths of the raccoons. The raccoons
were stabbed to death while trapped by
the groundskeepers in a garbage dum-
pster.
HURON VALLEY Humane Society
Animal Welfare Officer Delores Gib-

son said yesterday that the Humane
Society "would have liked to see a higher
fine," but she added that the judges may
have considered the University's ac-
tions against the employees when
making their decisions.
"We're not totally displeased," Gib-
son said.
CASH $
Pi-vii " UP"

E --
.00.016-

HOUSING DIVISION
RESIDENT STAFF JOB OPENINGS
FOR 1982-83
Have You Considered the U-M Housing Option?
The Housing Division is looking for well-qualified
candidates to serve in the Residence Halls as:

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