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January 08, 1981 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-01-08

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The Michigan Daily-Thursday, January 8, 1981-Page 7
R EDUC TIONS NECESSARY FRYE SA YS

'U' programs face cuts

(Continued from Page 1)
directors.
THE PROGRAMS and activities will
be evaluated with the objective of
determining whether substantial
savings can be made by either exten-
sive reduction or discontinuation, ac-
cording to Frye.
University executive officers-the
vice presidents who are responsible for
the reviews-emphasize that the list is
"preliminary" because of emotions in-
volved in selecting programs for either
severe cuts or elimination. Jobs and
services will inevitably be dropped in
the course of the reviews.
"We'll probably look at everything as
time goes on," said University
President Harold Shapiro, "but we had
to start somewhere."
ADMINISTRATORS have created
three categories of programs to be
reviewed. The first category includes
major activities and services that will
be subjected to extensive internal
review by the executive officers and
their staffs with the goal of significant
savings. Included in this group are
WUOM, CRLT, the Extension Service,
and Recreational Sports.
The second category includes ad-
ministrative units or sub-units that will
be reviewed with a similar savings
goal, but probably less extensively. In-
formation Services, Housing Ad-
ministration, Summer Commencement
and University Publications are in this
group.
The third category includes activities
that cut across two or more units, such
as all counseling services, academic
support services (admissions, financial
aid,) security and safety networks, and
special student support services
(minority student services, the Oppor-
tunity Program.) Administrators say
those areas will be subject to review
with the objective of performing the
functions and services more efficiently,
while reducing costs.
Directors of the affected programs.
are reacting with a mixture of fear of
losing their programs and employees
and understanding the need for all
programs to share the University's
financial burden.
"You don't mind if I cry while you
ask, do you?" Hazen Schumacher,
director of WUOM and Michigan
Media, two of the affected programs,

said in a telephone interview.
SCHUMACHER SAID he expected as
much as 50 percent of University fun-
ding of his programs would be cut by
the time the review process is com-
pleted.
But in the case of WUOM, the amount
of University funding it receives affects
the amount of federal money the radio
station can obtain. This year, WUOM
got $110,000 in federal funds-or 27 cen-
ts for every dollar the University
provides.
Alfred Storey, director of the Univer-
sity Extension Service,- said Tuesday
that while he didn't know the scope of
the review, he was preparing to
examine "every aspect of the budget."
"OUR ROLE IS simply that we are
being reviewed carefully as are some
other major units," Storey said.
Although $3 million must be cut from
the budgets, a unit being reviewed will
not -necessarily have its budget
reduced.
"We can recommend restructuring,
redeploying, deleting, whatever," Vice
President for Student Services Henry
Johnson said. "There are a number of
outcomes that could result from the
reviews."
THE REVIEWS have to be completed
by the beginning of the next fiscal year,
which begins July 1.
The exact procedures for reviewing
each program or activity have yet to be
determined. After meeting with direc-
tors of the units in their jurisdiction, the
six vice presidents will submit review
plans and other pertinent information
to Shapiro. The executive officers
should have the first draft of the review
procedures ready by Jan. 16, Johnson
said.
The University Budget Priorities
Committee, an advisory group com-
posed of faculty, students, and ad-
ministrators, will also participate in the
reviews.
Dentistry Prof. Robert Craig, chair-
man of that committee, said it will ser-
ve as a study group during the review
process, and will also establish two
subcommittees to examine the Exten-
sion Service and CRLT.
"We have to work rapidly, but not so
rapidly that we do a superficial job,"
Craig said. Frye said he hoped to have
the subcommittee reports by the end of
February.

A PRELIMINARY LIST OF UNITS AND ADMINISTRATIVE
FUNCTIONS TO BE REVIEWED
Category I: Units or Programs
Broadcasting - Radio (WUOM)
Center for Research on Learning and Teaching
Extension Service
Institute for Environmental Quality
Michigan Media
Recreational Sports
Category II: Administrative Functions and Services
Gift Receiving
Information Services
Investment Office
Health Science Relations
Housing Administration
Mail Services
Periodic Health Appraisal Unit
Personnel Office,
Plant Extension and Maintenance
Purchasing and Stores
Project Awareness - Housing
Residence Halls Counseling
State/Community Relations
Summer Commencement
University Club
University Publications
Category III: Function Involving Two or More Administrative
Units
Academic Support Services
Analytical Support Services
Counseling of all types
Communications Media/Service and Public Events
Fund Raising Activities and Development Efforts
Mail/Messenger Systems
Security and Safety Networks
Special Student Support Services

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Dly ,Photo by, MAUIREEN O'MAAL[EY'

A CITY PARKING enforcer reads the license plate number of a soon-to-be
towed car on Oakland Street into her radio yesterday. Parking enforcement
officers, tow trucks, and snow plows collaborated on the first day of a city-
wide emergency snow clean up.
1now m1oving process
(Continued from Page 1)
gperations yesterday only moved the a spokeswoman at Brewer's Gulf,
illegally parked cars temporarily, then North Campus service station, mar
r4-parked them once the snow was cars were impounded for oth(
dluared. violations.
"The wreckers are authorized to tow Belcher said an emergency snowfa
end impound the cars but I assume that costs the city around $5,000 a day. H
d6r the first couple of times they'll be said towing costs add another $3-$4,0
lehient," Belcher noted. He said the on top of that.
city could become "more hard-nosed" The Mayor said emergency sn
about enforcing the ordinance in future removal procedures, which have bet
snow emergencies. implemented only once before, shou
However, all illegally parked cars be completed "within the next day
were given $5 tickets and, according to so-providing it doesn't snow."

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LESSONS

* RENTALS

*

fficals fear city missing
.3, 000 in earlycnu al
By ELAINE RIDEOUT HE ALSO SAID census takers
Ann Arbor officials have lodged an of- deviated on head counts in student
ficial complaint with the U.S. Census housing areas. He said the city is
.Bureau, claiming the agency "missed" working with the University to come up
about 3,000 persons in its preliminary with the correct data indicating where
.city population report. students live.
Census officials will refer to Adding to the city's troubles,
preliminary data indicating a total of Sprenkel said, city officials were forced
:IX},483 city residents while Ann Arbor's to appeal -to already overburdened
disputed count is being processed at the regional and national census offices af-
JWfersonville, Ind. computer center, ter the local agency closed down last
,lGy Administrator Terry Sprenkel ex- July. ''Part of the reason this thing has
pliined. not been resolved is because many of
the census people in southern Michigan
THE CENSUS bureau figure is highly are occupied with the Detroit court
-nrepresentative, city officials say, case," he said.
,ontending the total should be at least
"t(61000. The city official added that he expec-
Sprenkel said the city is gathering ts the Ann Arbor count to be resolved
,data of its own to try and convince cen- through discussion and negotiation,
sus officials of the validity of its claim. without requiring court action.
"We have data by census tracks and Officials say they are not sure how
* 'bocks that we feel could justify a cen- much an undercount could cost the city.
.sus of 106,000 plus," Sprenkel said.
City Budget Director Patrick Kenney
Sprenkel explained that the explained that city census figures help
discrepency between local and census to determine state and federal revenue
figures arose from confusion over the allocations for the next 10 years. They
location of city boundary lines. "We're may allocate our share (of state and
proving certain areas became part of federal dollars) based on the
the city within the last ten years," he preliminary figures and adjust later
paid. on," he said.

* SALES

* EXPERT REPAIR

Grand jury
SACI tAMN'G, "Calif: AP -tn 1
what attorneys say may be the first
such case in the nation, a Lake Coun-
ty grand jury which met more than
five years ago will pay $25,000 and
retract critical comments it made '
about a firm that never was indic-
ted.1
In return, the engineering firm,
Gillett-Harris-Duranceau &
Associates of Yuba City, has agreed

p aysfi rm
to drop a $5.4 million libel suit it filed ,
against the grand 'jury four years
ago.
The firm's attorney. Donald Lit-
tlejohn of Colusa, said his research
during the case indicated it could be
the first such settlement against a
grand jury in the United States.
Sixteen members of the grand
jury voted last month to issue the
retraction and agree to the payment.

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