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February 03, 1981 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-02-03

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Page 2-Tuesday, February 3, 1981-The Michigan Daily
EDUCA TION SECR ETAR YACTS SWIFTLY

Bell cans Carter

From AP and UPI
WASHINGTON - Education Secretary Terence
Bell yesterday scrapped the Carter administration's
controversial bilingual education proposals that would
have required the nation's schools to teach
youngsters in their native language.
"Nothing in the law or the Constitution anoints the
Department of Edcucation to be National School
Teacher, National School Superintendent, or
National School Board," Bell said in announcing that
the proposed rules would be thrown out.
HE SAID THE rules, which were proposed but
never carried out by his predecessor, Shirley Huf-
stedler, were "harsh, inflexible, burdensome, un-
workable, and incredibly costly."

The rules would have required a school to set up a
bilingual classes when it had 25 or more students
from one language group within two grade levels.
Where there were fewer than 25 such students,
schools were to provide bilingual instruction through
one central school with tape recordings or bilingual
teachers serving several schools.
The rules also would have mandated that children
with limited or no ability to speak English must be
taught basic courses - such as reading, math, and
science - in their native language along with instruc-
tion in English.
"THIS DOES NOT mean we are going to cop out on

proposal
But Rep. Robert Garcia (D-N.Y.) - who represen-
tsthelargely Hispanic South Bronx - said, "If this is
the first major education decision of the Reagan ad-
ministration, then this country is in for absolute
disaster. My God."
Ruben Bonilla, president of the League of United
Latin American Citizens, said Bell's move is "but one
more example that the Reagan administration is
trying to disembowel the Hispanic community. This
is a very steep price to pay for having given the
Republicans the strongest Hispanic vote in history.'
Bell said his department will continue to operate
under previous bilingual education guidelines that
lack the force of law.

our responsibility as far
ned," Bell said.

as civil rights are concer-

r

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Oki

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troops in
WASHINGTON (AP) - President
Reagan pledged yesterday that the
United States will maintain its troop
strength in South Korea, burying the
former Carter administration's long-
stalled plan to withdraw American for-
ces.
"The United States has no plans to
withdraw U.S. ground combat forces
from the Korean peninsula," Reagan
said in a communique following talks
here with South Korean President Chun
Doo-hwan. Both leaders signed the
communique.
IN FACT, A senior State Department
official said it's possible that the United
States could strengthen its forces in
South Korea if needed, although
probably not ground forces.
Reagan clearly used the occasion of
Chun's official visit to demonstrate the
I " SUMMER CAMPS
The Ann Arbor Y is now accept-
ing applications for staff posi-
tions at the following camps:
CAMP AL-GON-QUIAN: o resident
camp for boys and girls )ocated on Burt Lake in
northern Mich. Camp dates ore June 22 to August
8. Senior staff positions, ages 18 and above are
available in the following areas: horseback rid-
ing, sailing, canoeing, arts and crafts, trips direc-
tar, archery, nature, woodworking, riflery, land
sports, swimming and water skiing. Salary plus
room and board.
CAMP BIRKETT: A day camp for boys and
girls located on Silver Lake near Pinckney. Camp
dotes are June 22-August 21. Senior staff
positions, ayes 18 and above are available in the
following areas: Archery, swimming, sailing,
canoeing, arts and crafts, and nature.
Applications and additional In-
formation regarding positions at
both camps may be obtained by
contacting the Ann Arbor Y. 350
South Fifth Ave. Ann Arbor or
calling (313) 663-0536.

. Korea
importance of South Korea in the ad-
ministration's foreign policy and to
reassure the Korean leader that the
frictions that occurred during the for-
mer Carter administration won't carry
over to the Reagan administration.
By inviting Chun for a visit ahead of
leaders of major U.S. allies, Reagan
also showed his administration has con-
fidence in the Chun government, which
seized power in a military coup
following the assassination of President
Park Chung-hee in October 1979.
THE UNITED States maintains a,
military force of about 39,000 in South
Korea. Former Preisdent Carter with-
drew several thousand U.S. troops in
1979 to the dismay of the Korean
military.
However, the Carter administration
put the withdrawal plan in "abeyance"
after determining there had been a
major buildup of North Korean forces.
The plan was supposed to be reviewed
this year, but Reagan's statement
made clear yesterday that it's a dead
issue for his administration.
The State Department official, who
declined to be identified, said questions
of human rights were not raised by
Reagan during the talks. Human rights
abuses in South Korea were a major
point of contention in the relations bet-
ween the two governments while Carter
was in the White House.
Speaking to reporters with Chun at
his side, Reagan said he has assured
the Korean leader that "the United
States will remain a reliable and Par-
cific partner and we shall maintain the
strength of our forces in the Pacific."
Reagan said U.S. Asian allies, in-
cluding South Korea, Japan, Australia
and New Zealand, "will have our con-
tinued support as our European allies
have."
For his part, Chun said: "President
Reagan has given his firm assurances
that the United States has no intention
of withdrawing the American forces in
Korea. I am pleased that the present
level of the United States military
presence in Korea will be maintained."
Chun said U.S. forces provide "a vital
and indispensable contribution to not
only peace in Korea, but peace and
tranqulity in the Northeast Asia
region."
Reagan and Chun met for an hour,
and then Reagan held a luncheon in
Chun's honor in the White House Red
Room. Also attending the luncheon
were Vice President George Bush,
Secretary of State Alexander Haig, Jr.,
National Security Adviser Richard
Allen and Secretary of Defense Caspar
Weinberger.
Correction
A story on campus cooperatives in
Sunday's Daily should have explained
that room and board expenses are $200
per month this term.

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
GM suffers record loss
DETROIT-General Motors Corp. said yesterday it suffered its first an-
nual loss since 1921 last year-a record $763 million-but pulled out of the red
in the fourth quarter with a modest $62 million profit.
Auto industry analysts expect Chrysler Corp. to post a $1.7 billion loss for
the year-highest for any corporation in U.S.,history. They say Ford Motor
Co. likely will show losses of about $1.5 billion.
Neither operated profitably in the fourth quarter, analysts said. They ad-
ded that reports from Ford and Chrysler are expected in about two weeks.
Bani-Sadr attacks clergy,
Khomeini may intervene
BEIRUT, Lebanon-The speaker of Iran's Parliament, reacting to a new
attack by President Abolhassan Bani-Sadr on the clergy-led government,
annealed to Avatollah Ruhollah Knomeini yesterday to intervene in the
political power struggle.
Bani-Sadr stepped up the political strife over the weekend with an inter-
view in the newspaper Enghelah Islami that quoted him as saying there
should have been a national debate on freeing the 52 American hostages to
determine whether it was "a great service or high treason." He also accused
the clergy-dominated Parliament of trying to exclude him from political
decisions, the paper said.
Tehran Radio said Speaker Hashemi Rafsanjani-a member of the fun-
damentalist Islamic Republican Party that controls the Majlis-told
Parliament he would not respond to Bani-Sadr, but "we ask the imam to
consider this case personally."
Tehran Radio said Khomeini ruled yesterday that the state radio and
television stations should stay out of the conflict, instructing them to "serve
Islam, the Islamic revolution, and the nation" with "utmost neutrality."
Ecuador-Peru border silent
LIMA, Peru-Guns fell silent along the disputed border between Ecuador
and Peru yesterday, and Brazil announced both countries agreed to a fron-
tier peacekeeping commission that would include U.S. representatives.
No new fighting was reported by either Peru of Ecuador. Their ground
troops and aircraft had battled for five days over three remote border posts
in the Condor mountain range on the western edge of the Amazon jungle
about 800 miles north of Lima. Both nations claimed their armed forces in-
flicted heavy losses, but gave no casualty figures.
A Brazilian Foreign Ministry spokesperson said in Brasilia that the com-
batants agreed to accept observers from the United States, Brazil, Argen-
tina, and Chile-the four countries that guaranteed a treaty signed in 1942
'that ended an earlier border war. The diplomats have been meeting in the
Brazilian capital since Sunday night and the Brazilian spokesperson an-
nounced the accord after a 20-hour marathon session.
Polish official blasts strikers
WARSAW, Poland-Government negotiators ,and strike leaders in tense
southern Poland reported some progress yesterday in their attempts to ease
regional labor crises. At the same time, a top Communist Party leader
blasted "advocates of chaos and destruction" for inspiring what he called
politically motivated strikes.
The stern warning by Stefan Olszowski, Politburo member and one of the
most influential of Poland's party leaders, was the latest in a series of
statements underlining the leadership's concern over the persistence of
strikers in the industrial south.
o But government and labor negotiating teams said the regional talks aimed
at ending the strike flareups by farmers and workers had reached
agreement on some points.
Rise in food costs
slows in January
The first month of 1981 brought a little bit of relief to grocery shoppers, ac-
cording to an Associated Press marketbasket survey, which found that bills
increased by only two-tenths of one percent during January.
The latest survey showed, among other things, that:
" The average marketbasket bill at the checklist stores at the start of
February was 14 percent higher than it was a year earlier.
" Almost three percent of all the items checked decreased during January;
decreases outnumbered increases by a slight margin. Coffee, eggs, and
frankfurters declined at the checklist stores in more than half the cities sur-
veyed; chopped chuck, pork chops, tomato sauce, and sugar dropped in
about one-third of the cities.
" Rises in the price of peanut butter and milk soured the price picture. Last
summer's drought cut the peanut crop and boosted prices. The rise in milk
prices is due mainly to an increase in government support levels.
Space shuttle launch delayed
WASHINGTON-The oft-delayed first flight of the manned space shuttle
suffered another setback yesterday when the space agency announced it is

postponing the liftoff another three weeks because of a fuel tank problem.
The launch, which had been set for March 17, now will be attempted no
earlier than the week of April 5, the National Aeronautics and Space Ad-
ministration announced. The delay could be even longer if the exact problem
is not pinpointed and corrected soon, the agency said.
Vol. XCI, No. 106
Tuesday, February 3,1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109.
Subscription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
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News room: (313) 764-0552, 76-DAILY: Sports desk: 764-0562: Circulation: 764-0558; Classified advertising:
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0

&~extonA
E~ducationa~
Center8o

For More Information -
Call or Write:
32466 Olde Franklin Drive
Farmington Hills, Mich. 48018
(313) 851-2969

-

0
0

Housing Division
BLACK HISTORY CELEBRATION - 1981
ThEme: F1R AE EAT LASTy??' - "WAK' L ']?, BL ACK AMEBLi A "

U/27
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211

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BLACKI HISTORY MONTH KICKOFFI-
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"U-M GOSPEL CHOIR CONC ERT."
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2/6

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FESTIVAL
h.1ighadprk11 pekr ow. 0
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EAST QUAD)ARTS ANI) CULTURAL
FESTIVAL.
Art E xhibit, last Quad. Room la
Polit ialWorkshop, (,ceine I-mee. 0 0 p i
Karate E hiition, Sbii i . afteiteri a, 7 00 p n,
GoplC net IA tl Croi:r nh7

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2/18

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"GOSPEL CONCERT"
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2/19
i i-

Editor-in-chief .................... SARA ANSPACH
Managing Editor................JULIE ENGEBRECHT
University Editor .................. LORENZO BENET
Student Affairs Editor.-.............JOYCE FRIEDEN
City Editor........................ ELAINE RIDEOUT
Opinion Page Editors...............DAVID MEYER
KEVIN TOTTIS
Arts Editor ..... .... .. ANNE GADON
Sports Editor ....................MARK MIHANOVIC
Chief Photographer. .. . ............ . DAVID HARRIS
NEW STAFF: Beth Allen, Nancy Bilyeau, Claudia
Centomini. Rita Clark. Debi Davis. Grea Davis. Anne

BUSINESS STAFF
Business Manager......-.-..-....RANDI CIGELNIK
Sales Manager.................... BARB FORSLUND
Operations Manager......-........SUSANNE KELLY
Display Manager ........... MARY ANN MISIEWICZ
Assistant Display Manager .......... NANCY JOSLIN
Classified Manager...-..........DENISE SULLIVAN
Finance Manager ...............,..GREGG HADDAD
Nationals Manager ....................CATHY BAER
Sales Coordinator ............ E. ANDREW PETERSEN
BUSINESS STAFF: Bob Abrahams. Meg Armbruster.
Joe Brodo, Maureen Delove, Judy Feinberg. Karen

01

I . iln <'/niii fImhiinini
"Era Jesse Col~lectio,- Sicaiis luililiu.
"Blick Stuidies Pai'ti. Present & Fuiiure"

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