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February 01, 1981 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1981-02-01

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01

Page 2-Sunday, February 1, 1981-The Michigan Daily

Co-op housing offers unique
mix of personalities, lifestyles

(Continued from Page 1)
years we can take care of all the
students who come in."
According to Buchele there are ap-
proximately 600 spaces for residents.
Of these, about half are open for new
residents each year.
Co-ops are one of the few places that
have openings for winter term, one
reason they are so popular with tran-
sfer students.
The North Campus Co-ops have a
higher vacancy rate and turnover than
those on central and the athletic cam-
puses. Michigan House's Schwartz at-
tributes this to the location, size, and

construction of the buildings on North
Campus. He says the modern building
style of the large complex "lends a
dorm-like appearance so the environ-
ment is not as homey."
Students choose co-ops for a variety
of reasons. Doug McMahon, a three-
week member of the ICC and new
student at the University, said the dor-
ms are "too wild."
Engineering student Hope Piuck, a
Michigan House resident, said she wan-
ted to leave the dorm also, but she felt
that apartment living was too isolated.
"The co-ops are more intimate," she
said.

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While economizing is still a prime
reason for joining, Buchele says he is
"perplexed that mote people aren't
joirling us," in these hard economic
times.
"Dark financial clouds often mean
sunshine for the co-ops," Buchele said,
but apparently these clouds are not
dark enough to boost ICC membership.
The first student residential co-op in
North America was established in Ann
Arbor in the 1930s. Students, hardhit by
the Depression doubled up to cut costs
so they could remain in school.
This term room and board costs of co-
op living come to $200.
Mystery
illness hits
six Texas
students
DALLAS '(AP) - Six art students at
Southern Methodist University have
contracted a mystery ailment that
resembles both Legionnaires' disease
and a deadly form of metal poisoning
reported earlier along the Texas Coast,
doctors say.
"It's pretty much of a mystery," said
Dr. James Garriott, a Dallas
toxicologist who has been investigating
the cases for two months.
"At this point, nobody knows what to
do."
All six victims - who are reporting
loss of hair, numbness of extremities
and, in one case, loss of fingernails
are art students at Southern Methodist
University, said Dick Sutcliffe, director
of university public relations, adding
their course of study was the only
known common factor.
Garriott said 400 samples of art
supplies from the school's art depar-
tment have been tested for the rare,
poisonous metal thallium, but no trace
was found.
Officials at the University of Texas
Poison Control Center have confirmed
at least eight cases of thallium
poisoning since last September. At least
one death may have resulted from an
exposure to the metal.
Karl Kroshinsky and Michael Ortlieb.
were the famous "Cheap uglasses"
double-play duo in the 1950s.
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on the exam of interest to
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smurn photo
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I

IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Polish workers gain
access to media
WARSAW, Poland-Poland's independent trade unionists yesterday
backed off from their demand for an immediate five-day workweek, but won
government concessions on access to communications media in marathon
negotiations.
The issue of an independent farmers' union, however, remained
unresolved and the possibility of a nationwide work stoppage Tuesday still
loomed.
Union sources said a government commission led by Deputy Premier
Mieczyslaw Jagielski was expected in the southeastern town of Rzeszow
today for talks with farmers pressing for recognition of their "Rural
Solidarity" union.
Negotiators apparently surmounted one of the major issues contributing
to continuing labor unrest by agreeing to a compromise under which three
Saturdays each month would be work-free, with work on the fourth.
March strike looms as pilots
tour nation to gain support
WASHINGTON-The major airlines are bracing for a threatened pilots
strike over government safety policy, a protest that could leave much of the
nation briefly without scheduled air service in early March.
Leaders of the 33,000-member Air Line Pilots Association are in the midst
of a month-long, 15-city tour aimed at enlisting pilot and public support for a
work stoppage which could last from one to three days.
While the union claims to have broad backing for the protest, industry
sources said privately in interviews that some pilots are sharply divided on
its merits. In addition, several prominent carriers, including American,
Airlines, have pilots who do not belong to the association.
But if the protest attains its goals, industry sources acknowledged, air
traffic could be severely interrupted and the airlines involved might lose as
much as $80 million a day. Commuter and many regional lines would not be
affected
Kurd warriors side with Iraq
NOWSUD, Iraqi-occupied Iran-Iran's ethnic Kurds have taken up arms
on the side of Iraqi invaders and seized on the Persian Gulf war to press their
decades-old fight for independence.
Kurds, renowned as warriors, are serving as scouts and commandos for
Iraqi forces occupying sections of the rugged Zagros Mountains in north-
western Iran.
But what the fiercely independent tribesmen stand to gain, even if their
allies win the war, remains to be seen.
They have received no public promises from Iraq that it would grant them
more autonomy than is enjoyed by their brothers across the pre-war border
in northeastern Iraq, where numerous small-scale Kurdish rebellions have
been quelled over the past five years.
Zimbabwe prenier denounces
South African 'aggression'
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa-Zimbabwe Prime Minister Robert
Mugabe has denounced a South African raid on black nationalists' homes in
neighboring Mozambique as "a naked act of aggression," and said his own
country would strengthen its own defense forces to prevent similar attacks.
Mugabe said in a statement released yesterday in Salisbury that the at-
tack Friday on a suburb of the Mozambican capital, Maputo, was "part of
the overall strategy of the apartheid regime to destabilize the democratic
political order of the frontline states."
The South African Defense Force announced that 30 black nationalist
guerillas and two white South African commandos were killed in the raid.
South African officials said the raid was launched against command posts
of the outlawed African National Congress.
Survivor says captain believed
ship that sunk was sabotaged
JAKARTA, Indonesia-The captain of the Indonesian passenger ship that
exploded in flames and sank in the stormy Java Sea with the loss of more
than 500 lives believed his vessel was sabotaged, a survivor said yesterday.
Syafri Kaliluddin, a reporter for Indonesia's Antara news agency, also
charged the crew of the Tampomas-2 ignored panic-stricken passengers
looking for lifejackets and concentrated on saving themselves.
The inter-island passenger ship caught fire Monday night on a trip from
Ujungpandang, on the island of Sulawesi, to Jakarta, about 800 miles to the
west.
Garwood preparing to
go before jury
CAMP LEJEUNE, N.C.-The last battle of the Vietnam War will be won
or lost this week in a tiny courtroom echoing with tales of torture and death,

and of insanity, betrayal and the survival of the fittest.
The U.S. government argues that Marine Pfc. Robert Garwood, 34, who
spent nearly half his life in Vietnamese captivity, deserves to spend the rest
of it in an American military prison because he collaboraked with the com-
munists.
Sbe Sirbigan iBaiIg
Vol. XCI, No. 105
Sunday, February 1, 1981
The Michigan Daily is edited and managed by students at The University
of Michigan. Published daily Tuesday through Sunday mornings during the
University year at 420 Maynard Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 48109.
Subscription rates: $12 September through April (2 semesters); $13 by mail
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News room: (313) 764-0552. 76-DAILY; Sports desk: 764-0562; Circulation: 764-0558: Classified advertising.
764s0557: Display advertising: 764-0554; Billing: 764.0550;C omposing room: 764-0556.

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Read and Use
Daily
Classifieds!

LAB AT:
STORES AT:

3180 PACKARD
691 S. MAPLE
1315 S. UNIVERSITY

973-0770
663-6529
994-0433

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SPRING BREAK IN DAYTONA BEACH
FEB. 20 - MARCH 1, 1981

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$199
$185

4 PER ROOM
[2 Double Beds]
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[3 Double Beds)

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TRIP INCLUDES
" Round trip motor coach transportation on first
class charter coaches leaving the caipus Friday
evening Feb. 20 and traveling straight through with
plenty of partying to Daytona Beach, arriving the
following day. The return trip departs the following
Sat. in the afternoon, and arrives back on campus
the next day.
" A full seven nights accommodations at the Plaza
Hotel of Daytona Beach, Florida.
" A great time in Daytona with special parties and
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" Optional trip to Disney World available.

Editorin-Chief. ..
Managing Editor...
City Editor ..........
University Editors.
Features Editor.
Opinion Page Editors.
Arts Editor....................

MARK PARRENT
MITCH CANTOR
PATRICIA HAGEN
TOMAS MIRGA
BETH ROSENBERG
ADRIENNE LYONS
. JOSHUA PECK
HOWARD WITT
. ANNE GADON

Business Monager.. .
Sales Manager......
Operations Manager...
Co-Display Manager....
Co-Display Manoger.....
Classified Manager..
- Finance Manager... .
Nationals Manager.
Circulation Manager. ...
Sales Coordinator.

ROSEMARY WICKOWSKI
KRISTINA PETERSON
KATHLEEN CULVER
DONNA DREBIN
ROBERT THOMPSON
...SUSAN KLING
GREGG HADDAD
......LISA JORDAN
.TERRY DEAN REDDING
E. ANDREW PETERSEN

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Sports Editor Ar..Ar.w. ALAN FANGER
NEWS STAFF WRITERS: Arlyti Afremow, Beth Allen.
Sara Anspach. Lorenzo Benet. Nancy Bilyeau Doug
Brice. Julie Brown. Moura Carry, Claudia Centomini.
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BUSINESS STAFF: Cathy Baer. Glenn Becker Joe
Broda. Randi Cigelnik, Maureen Deltave. Barb
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Hendrick. Nancy Joslin, Peter Kamin. Catherine

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