100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 01, 1981 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-02-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


The Michigan Daily-Sunday, February 1, 1981-Page 3
Hostages may see dollar
compensation for ordeal

AP Photo
Top secret trash
Sailors from the Orlando Naval Training Center in Orlando, Fla. sift through a 25 ft. high, 40 ft, wide mound of garbage
for 5,000 pages of classified documents that were thrown away accidentally. The sailors all had clearance to read the
top secret refuse.
Reagan hiring freeze leaves
potential employees in the co

- WASHINGTON (AP) - The 52
Americans freed by Iran may come
through their ordeal in better financial
shape than they had expected -
especially if Congress passes a hostage
compensation act.
A state department official, who
asked not to be identified, suggested
that the former captives be provided
compensation equivalent to that gran-
ted Amercian servicemen who were
prisoners of war in Vietnam, but in-
creased to provide for inflation.
HE SAID THE suggested formula
could provide compensatory payments
of $15 to $20 for each of the 444 days the
hostages were held, with the lump-sum
payments ranging from about $66,800 to
$88,000.
Although the official stressed that his
proposal is not the department's official
position, it is expected that such
legislation will be taken up soon.
While the former captives were in
Iran, Congress passed legislation
designed to financially protect their
families, but delayed action on
measures granting compensation to the
hostages themselves, for fear of
agitating an already delicate situation.
DURING THEIR captivity, the for-
mer hostages continued to receive full
pay and allowances. The money was
sent to their dependents, if any.
Under terms of the Hostage Relief
Act, passed during the stalemate,
money that was not paid to families or
dependents went into checking accoun-
ts. Interest on the sums accumulated is
to be calculated at the highest interest,
rate level during the period for U.S.
Treasury "T" bonds.
The entire 141 months of salary is
free of federal taxes under the bill,

which also provided broad health care
benefits to the hostages' immedidate
family members during the hostages'
captivity.
In addition, a dozen or more college-
age children of former hostages will be
reimbured for educational expenses
under a program administered by the

Estate Planning,
Wills and Trusts
for
Faculty and Staff since 1968
J. Michael Meade

Veterans Administration.
THE FORMER hostages also may
benefit from another piece of
legislation, which raised from $15,000 to
$40,000 the maximum amount of reim-
bursement available for property lost
in hostage-taking or terrorist
situations.

A ttorney at Law
Graduate University of Michigan Law School 1963
111 S. Fourth Ave.

995-3110

WASHINGTON (AP) - The callers
can be counted by the thousands, from
Anchorage, Alaska, to San Juan, Puer-
to Rico. Some are crying, others cur-
sing, many begging.
They are the people who were
promised federal jobs only to be left out
in the cold by President Reagan's
hiring freeze.
"The panic, the uncertainty can rip
your guts out," says a government of-
ficial on the answering end of many
calls. He requests anonymity, saying,
"We've literally had threats on our
lives."
REAGAN'S HIRING freeze, back-
dated to Nov. 5, is designed to sym-
bolize the administration's intent to cut
federal spending. It also is the opening
move in a promised campaign to
reduce the government's size.
But for thousands of potential em-
ployees, the freeze is proving an
agonizing shock. And for bureaucratt
who must administer the program, it i
creating turmoil. ,
"Officials are still trying to figure out
how this all will operate," says an Of-
fice of Personnel Management
spokeswoman.
"We have to sit here and tell these
people, 'Gee, I don't know,' when we're
asked about jobs," says another of-
ficial.
Even the number of people affected

by the freeze appears uncertain, with
officials offering only an estimate of
about 28,000.
ALMOST IMMEDIATELY after the
hiring freeze was signed lastrweekend,
court challenges were filed,
congressional offices began to protest,
and personal horror stories
materialized.
The freeze, which is much tougher
than one imposed by former President
Carter last year, applies to "all depar-
tments and establishments and to all
types of appointments, temporary as
well as permanent, except for certain
exempted positions."
It will not affect people who actually
have begun new jobs; only those
promised positions and 9thers who an-
ticipate federal jobs or non-career
positions in the government's Senior
Executive Service.
SOME OF THOSE left out in the cold
may qualify as hardship cases under
guidelines issued by the administration
Thursday. To be eligible, they must:
* Produce a "definite, written offer of
employment" made by a duly
authorized personnel officer between
Nov. 5 and Jan. 20, the day Reagan was
inaugurated.
* Show that not being hired "will
result in demonstrable, severe and
irreparable financial loss.'
* Prove that they were "prudent";

that they did not, for instance, quit a
previous job prematurely.
* Demonstrate that the federal agen-
cy was "prudent" in offering the job, in
light of "general public knowledge a
freeze would be applied."
The National Treasury Employees
Union has filed a class-action suit in
U.S. District Court, challenging
Reagan's right to make the freeze
retroactive.

TALK TO TAMARACK ABOUT
CHALLENGING SUMMER
CAMP JOBS WITH KIDS
INTERVIEWING FEBRUARY 6
Summer Placement
CALL 764-7456 FOR APPOINTMENT
Tamarack is a Jewish residential camp
camp sponsored by the Fresh Air
Society of Metropolitan Detroit.
6600 W. Maple Rd., W. Bloomfield, Mi. 48033
(313) 661-0600. Call or, write far further information.
ABENG
presents
The 7th Annual Minority Arts and Cultural Festival
February 5, 6, 7, 1981

Vincent Price
as
~ Oscar Wilde
in
DiVersions
'~e rlights
February 5, 8 pm
Power Center
Professional Theatre Program
Tickets at the PTP ticket office - Phone 64-0450
..I...

STU DENTS
FACUL1Ff

-HAPPENINGS-
SUNDAY
FILMS
AAFC - Modern Times, 2, 4, 7 & 9 p.m., Michigan Theatre, Shadows of
Forgotten Ancestors, 7 p.m., MLB 3, The White Bird with a Black Spot, 9
p.m., MLB 3, War of the Fools, 2 p.m., Lorch Hall Aud.
Alternate Action-A Face in the Crowd, 7 p.m., MLB 4, Streetcar Named
Desire, 9:15p.m., MLB 4.
Cinema Guild-Monsieur Verdoux, 7 p.m., Lorch Hall Aud., The Bellboy, 9
p.m., Lorch Hall Aud., Two For The Road, 7 p.m., Aud. A, Angell Hall.
Cinema II-Two for the Road, 7 p.m., Funny Face, Aud. A, Angell Hall.
PERFORMANCES
Canterbury Loft-"Saturn's Young," 7 p.m., 332S. State.
PTP-"The Elephant Man," 2,8p.m., Power Ctr.
Ark-Barry O'Neill, 8 p.m., 1421 Hill.
Byrin Pearson and Arthur Vidrich-"Music for Trumpet and Organ," 4
pm., St. Andrew's Episcopal Church, 306 North Division St.
Black History Celebration-"University Gospel Choir Concert," 7:30 p.m.,
Couzens Hall.
MISCELLANEOUS
Hillel-UJA Hatikvah Campaign Organizational Meeting, 11 a.m., Israeli
Folk Dancing, 12-3 p.m., Kosher Deli Dinner, 6 p.m., Hillel Hebrew
Musicians, 8 p.m., 1429 Hill St.
Alpha Chi Sigma-Spaghetti Dinner, 4-7 p.m., 1319 Cambridge.
MONDAY
FILMS
Cinema Guild-The Devil and Miss Jones, 7, 9p.m., Lorch Hall Aud.
SPEAKERS
LSA Senior Faculty Series-Lecture, Prof. Philip Elving, "Social Dilem-
mas: A Chemist's Response: Why Engage in Research?" 8 p.m., Rackham
Amph.
Energy Studies-Lecture, Prof. Roy Rappaport, "Energy and Adaptive
Structure," 4 p.m., East Conference Rm., Rackham.
Solar Principles and Applications-Lecture, Billy Born, "Design and
Planning in the '80's," 7:30 p.m., Chrysler Aud., N. Campus.
N. Eastern and N. African Studies-Bag Lunch Lecture, Jerrold Green,
"Religion and Political Change in Iran," 12p.m., Lane Hall Commons.
MEETINGS
Mich. Journal of Economics-4 p.m., 301 Econ.
CEW-Open House Discussion, 6-9 p.m., Center Library, 328 Thompson.
TTnderardtuate Wnmen's meeting-8-g nm - Guild House .02 Monrne

STAFF
NOMINATE OUTSTANDING TEACHERS, RESEARCHERS,
AND COUNSELORS FOR A FACULTY AWARD:
ACHIEVEMENT AWARD: For Associate and Full Pro-

fessors
RECOGNITION AWARD: For, Assistant,
and Junior Full Professors.

Associate,

Opening Ceremonies
Jazz Concert
Fraternity/Sorority Exhibit
Art Exhibition
Political workshop

Fashio

Gospel Concert
Martial Arts Exhibition
Poetry Reading
on/Performing Arts Show
Benefit Dance

AMOCO OUTSTANDING TEACHER AWARD: For Reg-
ular Faculty Who Have Demonstrated Excel-
lence in Undergraduate Teaching.
TEACHING ASSISTANT AWARD: For Effective and
Creative Graduate Teaching Assistants.
SEE YOUR DEPARTMENT CHAIR FOR NOMINATION FORMS
OR CALL 763-1283

All Events Will Be Held At East Quadrangle
And Are Free Of Charge!

The Minority Arts and Cultural Festival is Co-Sponsored by
The East Quad Representative Assembly, Housing Special Programs,
Michigan Student Assembly and The Residential College of the University of Michigan.

ALL NOMINATIONS DUE: FEBRUARY 20, 1981

1

MEN"

I I

WI LLIAM

WI

I

I

Gi

ve

a

Pc
F EE

STAFFORD
)etry Reading on
3RUARY 2, 1981

MONDAY

at 4:00 pm
n RACKHAM AMPHITHEATRE

i

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan