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October 23, 1981 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1981-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Police program fights rape

(Continued from Page 1)
more vulnerable," Wright said. If a
person doesn't look confident or
authoratative, he said, "it might in-
dicate in a person's mind that you are a
victim."
Wright suggests walking on the out-
side edges of the sidewalks, away from
any bushes that could hide assailants.
He added that women should take
routes that are well lit, even if they are
an inconvenience.
If a woman is attacked in an, area
where people are nearby, Wright said
she should scream "Fire?" instead of
"Help!" This will get more people to
respond, he said. He added that it is im-
portant to control your senses and
maintain your breathing pattern so you
don't pass out.
Several self protection methods
Wright teaches can temporarily stun

the assailant, rendering him incapable
of committing the crime, or allowing
time for the victim to run away.
DEFENSIVE tactics include grab-
bing the assailant's testicles, gouging
his eyes, kicking his knee, stomping on
his instep and using the heal of your
palm to hit his Adam's apple, chin, or
nose bridge.
This type of reaction may not always
be the best solution, Wright cautions. In
fact, he said, "I don't recommend that
victims use active resistence." He ad-
ded that each individual must use her
own intuition or skill to escape the at-
tacker.
Wright said it is hard in the short run
to assess the results of his rape preven-
tion prograri, but said that other
jurisdictions that have used similar
programs have showed marked
decreases in some crime categories.

4
3:
I'
0.

MEEKREH Sponsors:
HOMECOMING
KEG PARTY
Saturday, October 24
9:30 PM
at HILLEL
1429 Hill St.
$1.00 to cover band
STREETLGHT -'

When it rains «ail

oto by JACKIE BEL

ILSA junior Joel Streicker struggles against his own umbrella in yesterday's
downpour.
New firm hired to complete
dorm window replacement

(Continued from Page 3)
must bear the loss and may sue BF
Johnston for the additional expense,
said Chris Fullner, an official of EFCO.
Installation of the windows-which is
expected to save more than $100,000 a
year in heating costs-began last fall
and continued through the school year
despite the protests of students who
complained that their rights were being
violated.
Students said that workmen entered
dorm rooms at 8 a.m.,-leaving some in a
state of general disrepair. Students also
said workmen were generally disgour-
teous towards them.
ALTHOUGH University spokesper-
sons defended the behavior of the
workmen last Spring, Boyer now main-
tains that the installation "probably
would have been much less of an issue
had the workmen been more
cooperative. They were supposed to
leave a student room the way they
found it."
Boyer describes this year's in-
stallation-thus far-as smoother. "I
have heard nothing but good comments
on (Nu-Vue's) people," he says:
Lance Gluckstein, a resident advisor

in East Quad, agrees with Boyer. "On-
ce it was accepted that they were
coming, the response was reasonably
positive. The attitude of the workmen
certainly helped," he said.
THE LESS-problematic installation
is also attributed to the elimination of
Tremco, the toxic caulking compound
that smelled up most rooms for more
than two days and made some students
ill. Nu-Vue has been using a much
weaker-smelling compound called
Vulkem' and Glukstien says it has
helped.
"The caulking smelled some," he
said, "but it was gone after a day and a
half."
Not all students have been as en-
thusiastic about the new workmen.
Some residents of East Quad were up-
set about not being notified before in-
stallers began to work on the outside of
the windows.
Despite the problems of the in-
stallation project, Boyer denies the
possibility that the University may
have supervised the job improperly.
"We were monitoring (the work), but
we just weren't getting any cooperation
from BF Johnston," he said.

0

y..

"ELECTRIC PERFORMANC ES,

i

,.

-WI

GRAND FUN,
ELEGANTLY
RAUNCHY, UN-,
EXPECTEDLY*
TOUCHING.'
-Sheila Benson, LOS ANGELES TIMES

SAVE YOUR
STUB!!!
From October 26 to 30th
it may be applied as a $2.00
SAVINGS on the purchase of
one pair of jeans . . . price
marked in green at
PACEMAKER FASHIONS .. .
F CIM l

"OUTRAGEOUSLY ENTER-
TAINING, BITCHILY FUNNY"
-David Ansen, NEWSWEEK MAGAZINE
"WONDERFUL DIALOGUE,
HILARIOUS SEX SCENES,

"w
29 90 42
SEC. ROW- SEAT
NORTHWESTERNvs MICHIGAN
SAT., OCT. 24, 1981 --.1.00 P.M.
ADMIT ONE :$ 42.00">.
PLYMOUTH ROAD MALL, ANN ARBOR
North Campus, Plymouth Rd..
1/2 mile westof U.S. 23
2771yPlymouth Rd. 668-6262
Open Dily 10' tiI 8p.m., Sot. 'ti6p.m.
MON TE TU FR 7:15 9:35
1 00 4-:00-7:5-9 153
ON AEPTter W7i F5 9:
5 R ARANTL~ PITUE
(UPAT ERNLEVEL 0i
r :{:" . .. BU.}.yr T". R EYNOLD"r}S::r' A 1.} r"{y.{;
{$ PATE-::: rNIT} "vY" $y"":i'-,.{.

BRILLIANT ACTING'

-Liz Smith,
NEW. YORK DAILY NEWS

RICH iad FAMOUS.

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